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Be gentle

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PAGB A Literary Anecdote 76 Forbearance....

278 Address to Winter 151 Father's Will. My

306 Address to Evening

151

Forgiveness of Injuries............ 192 Affliction ... 191 Forgiveness

193 A Christian, a Beggar all the Farmer's Faith. The................ 194 way through

217 For the Children ...................... 48 A Poor Parson

332 Anecdote of the Duke of Cam

“Go Work To-day" bridge......... 220 Hints to Youth........

450 " A little Lie"

......................... 258 A Word to Boys

It's very hard.......................... 305 277

216 A Tale with a Moral fastened

Idler. The

246 to the end

I have Lived Twelve Years

134 A Well-ordered Home............... 136

Ingratitude. A Dream

........... 161 | Juvenile Missionary Tree Answers to Questions .............. 251 Look Upward

81 Better times for Madagascar.... 28

Life Viewed through Minutes 276

139 Mabel and her Bible Lesson Blind ballad singer. The........ 200 Mother. The .........

307 Battle between an eagle and a Mercy. Pardoning

192 serpent......

274 Man. The Littleness of............ 193 Blind Boy. The......

276 More blessed to give, &c.......... 193 Book. The Best ... 250 Multum in Parvo ...................

194 Bonaparte Napoleon, &c. 306 Baby. The Dead ........... 159

Origin of the Autocrat's Head

108 Bishop of Natal, &C......... 222

ship Bright side. Look on............... 215 Pleasant Piety

217 Prevention better than .........

77 Contentment

140 Paul at the Theatre ................ 245 Curious Facts

124
Parental Example

155 Campbells, &c., of Homer........ 138 Cow Tree. The, of South Ame- Reasoning over a matter........... 247 rica

109 Remember, Chinese Temples........

93 Roses and Thorns............ 327
Cowper and his Publisher ........ 216 Subdivision of Labour
Cowper as a Letter-writer........ 279 She hath done what, &c........... 52
Children. Little

277
Snow Eyes

81 Cedars of Lebanon. The 298

187 Coal Mines, &C................

Scripture Illustrations ...........

288 Crazy Bridge. The ....... 304 The Heavenly Home ...............

82 Character. Slow Growth of .... 302

The Afflicted Christian ............

82 Consistency of Truth ...... 305 The Quiet and Melancholy, &c. 83 Charlie ; or, the Transplanted

The Worlding's Folly

30 Flower 157 | The World's Hell

248

The Little Girl's Still Deeds of Naval Daring ............ 145 The General Committee, &c. 26 Difficulties in Education, &c..... 217 The Rose .......... Death of an Infant. The ........ 219 The Soul's endless, &C............. 110 Dissipation. The Tree of.......... 249 | The Czar's Museum ...............

110 Do you read the Missionary The Debasing Influence, &c..... 111 Notices ......

248 The Song of the River ............ Discharge your duties, &c.

78 The Jews in Sheeraz ................ 280

The Two Thrones .................... 193 Eternity.......

194 | Two Reasons England. The Land of Freedom 92 The Discontented Violet .......... 190 Ecclesiastical Privilege

214 Eastern Aphorisms....

218

“You will be a Duke, but, &c.” 305 The Eye that sees in Darkness.. 238 Wooden Nutmegs ...............

384

27

249

154

278

193

215 Evil Reports. On listening to.... 140 Wellington in Marshall, &c. Female Degradation

221 Waiting upon God

108 .................... 189

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BIBLE TRANSLATION INTO THE ENGLISH

TONGUE. The most va luable of all books is the Bible. It is to be regretted, however, that this book, during nearly a thousand years previous to the Reformation, was a sealed record to the great bulk of people, both on the Continent and in this country. Towards the close of the middle, or

ages, an increased interest was manifested in Biblical literature. The earliest translation of the Bible into English extant was, it is believed, executed about the close of the thirteenth century, but the translator's name is lost. In about a century afterwards, John de Trevisa executed a translation of the Old and New Testaments into the English tongue.

It has been questioned, however, whether the work of Trevisa was a complete version, or only a translation of a few texts, scattered over the author's works, which are still extant in a manuscript state. Wicliff Was the contemporary of Trevisa, and is celebrated as having finished a translation from the Vulgate into Engliske about the year 1378.

But this translation was so costly, that none but the rich could purchase it. It has

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been estimated that the price at which it sold, would be equal to 40l. sterling, at the present day. A bill was soon brought into the House of Lords to suppress Wicliff's work, on which occasion the duke of Lancaster—a statesman in advance of his age, said—“We will not be the dregs of all; seeing other nations have the law of God, which is the law of our faith, written in their own language.” And he added with great solemnity, that “ he would maintain our having this law in our own tongue against those who brought in the bill, no matter who they were.” The duke succeeded in opposing the bill, and this success led to Wicliff's publishing another and more correct translation of the Bible. This translation, however, was the signal for a bitter and general persecution of such as read the Word of God. The next translation appeared in 1526, and was made by the celebrated John Tyndale. Wicliff's version had been rendered from the Latin, but Tyndale's was from the Greek, and it was the first translation of the New Testament out of the Greek into the mother tongue. Tyndale accomplished his work at Antwerp, from whence the translation was sent by some four or five merchants, hidden among bales of goods, to the shores of this country. But when it was known that many copies had found their way hither, the reading of them was denounced by the ecclesiastics of the day, and Tonstall, bishop of London, purchased all the copies that he could collect from all quarters, and committed them to the flames at St. Paul's Cross. While this was going on in England, new impressions were being sent forth from the printing-presses in Holland, so that in four years no fewer than four editions were published. The bishop of London's method of disposing of Tyndale's version met with approval in high quarters. Sir Thomas More was among those who approved his policy, until one day, in his Court, he questioned a heretic as to what persons in London enabled Tyndale to subsist abroad, and send forth his copies of the Scriptures ? And was no little surprised to receive for answer, that “It was the bishop of London who maintained him, by sending a sum of money to buy up the edition of his Testament.” It is recorded that Sir T. More used to punish all parties concerned in circulating the Scriptures, by obliging them to ride with their heads towards the tails of their horses, and the New Testament, and other books which they had dispersed, hung about their cloaks ; and at the Standard in Cheapside, to throw them into a fire prepared for that purpose.

But the power of the law was not sufficient. Sir Thomas, with the licence of the bishop of London, prepared a dialogue, in which he represented Tyndale as mistranslating three words of very great moment, viz., priests, church, and charity, which the worthy translator had rendered, "seniors, congregation, and love." Tyndale shrunk not from replying to the Lord Chancellor, but his efforts in the great cause of Bible circulation were ill requited by the political authorities of these times. After more than a year and a half's imprisonment, he was strangled, and his body committed to the flames. His last prayer was in behalf of the blind ruler who then wielded the royal sceptre of this country. “Lord, open the king of England's eyes !"

During the next seventy years a variety of translations were undertaken, with more or less success. But the great effort which resulted in the production of the Authorised Version, was made in the reign of James I. This translation was prescribed by royal mandate. James appointed fiftyfour learned men to perform the work, but before it was began, seven of the persons namned were either dead or had declined the task. The list given by Fuller consists only of forty-seven names. Ten of the number translated from the beginning of the Scriptures to the end of the second book of Kings. The next eight finished the other historical books, and the Hagiographa. Seven more were to translate the four greater prophets, the Lamentations of Jeremiah, and the minor prophets, twelve in number. Another party of eight had assigned them the four Gospels

, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Apocalypse. To seven more the king assigned the translation of the Apostolic Epistles. And finally, to the remaining seven, the

Apocryphal books, including the Prayer of Manasseh. Each party scrutinized the work of all the rest; and to this, in a great measure, is owing the extraordinary accuracy of the authorized version of the Sacred Scriptures. The work was commenced in 1607; the translators were three years in completing it. This translation was published in the year 1611: and all parties admit it to be a work of great merit. Seldom has any individual appeared who was more capable of appreciating such a work than the learned Selden. Now this distinguished man says, “The English translation of the Bible is the best translation in the world, and renders the sense of the original best, taking in for the English translation the Bishops' Bible as well as King James's. The Bible is rather translated into English words than into English phrase. The Hebraisms are kept, and the phrase of that language is kept."

LETTERS TO THE YOUNG.–No, 18.

THE POETRY OF COWPER.

My dear young Friends--Allow me once more, very sincerely, to wish you " a happy New Year.” It is a long time since my last letter appeared in this Magazine. Some of you may have inquired, as a person did some months ago, in writing to me, if Uncle Joseph is dead. Others, who have not entirely forgotten him, may say, as a friend did in a letter that I saw yesterday, “ I am looking every month for Uncle Joseph's long-promised letter on The Poetry of Cowper.” It is many months since I wrote a letter on the subject for you, but various causes have operated to prevent me from copying and sending it to the Editor. Perhaps, however, the remark holds true in this, as well as other matters, “ Better late than never.”

You will, I dare say, remember that several of my former letters were on the Poetry of Milton. I have reason to know that those letters were read with interest by many of the subscribers to the “ Juvenile Companion,"

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