Chronicles of Border Warfare, Or, A History of the Settlement by the Whites, of North-western Virginia, and of the Indian Wars and Massacres in that Section of the State : with Reflections, Anecdotes, &c

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Stewart & Kidd, 1895 - 447 páginas
The focal point of Chronicles of Border Warfare is the American settlement throughout the northwestern portion of colonial Virginia (an area which today encompasses parts of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania) from the French and Indian War to the Battle of Fallen Timbers, and the ensuing clashes with the indigenous population. -- From the publisher.
 

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Página 35 - Lo the poor Indian ! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind ; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Página 35 - Yet simple Nature to his hope has given, Behind the cloud-topt hill, an humbler heaven; Some safer world in depth of woods embraced, Some happier island in the watery waste, Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Página 2 - Comfort, all along the sea coast to the southward two hundred miles, and all that space and circuit of land, lying from the sea coast of the precinct aforesaid, up into the land, throughout from sea to sea, west and northwest...
Página 129 - Myself, and thee — a peasant of the Alps, Thy humble virtues, hospitable home, And spirit patient, pious, proud and free; Thy self-respect, grafted on innocent thoughts; Thy days of health, and nights of sleep; thy toils, By danger dignified, yet guiltless; hopes Of cheerful old age and a quiet grave, With cross and garland over its green turf, And thy grandchildren's love for epitaph ; This do I see — and then I look within^ — It matters not — my soul was scorch'd already ! C.
Página 23 - A separation into dialects may be the work of a few ages only, but for two dialects to recede from one another till they have lost all vestiges of their common origin, must require an immense course of time; perhaps not less than many people give to the age of the earth. A greater number of those radical changes of Ian* guage having taken place among the red men of America, proves them of greater antiquity than those of Asia.
Página 208 - My son, the Great Spirit has seen fit that we should die together, and has sent you here to that end. It is his will and let us submit; it is all for the best...

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