The American Common-school Reader and Speaker: Being a Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse, with Rules for Reading and Speaking

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John Goldsbury, William Russell
C. Tappan, 1844 - 428 páginas
 

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Contenido

The American Eagle C W Thomson
133
The Last Evening before Eternity J A Hillhouse
135
4a Character of Jesus C Teacher
136
Woman Miss C E Beecher
138
The Treadmill Song O W Holmes
140
Darkness Byron
141
God Derzhavin
143
Niagara Mrs Sigournry
146
The United States G BancrofT
147
Wouter Van Twiller WashingTon Irvino
149
Invocation of Mirth Milton
151
Marco Bozzaris F G Halleck
152
Waterloo Byron
154
Prussian Battle Hymn Ksrner
156
Bernardo del Carpio Mrs Hemans
158
William Kieft Washingvon Irving
160
Palmyra William Ware
161
Beauties of Nature Samuel G Howe
162
An Interesting Adventure William J Snrlling
163
Thoughts on Politeness Geo S Hillard
166
Same Subject concluded Id
167
Cottage on the Swiss Alps BuckminsTer
168
Peter Stuyvesant WashingTon Irving
169
Ode on Art Charles Spraoue
171
Robert Burns F G Halleck
172
The Future Life W C BryanT
174
The Spirit of Poetry H W Longfellow
175
The Soldiers Widow N P Willis
176
The Sicilian Vespers J G WhiTTier
177
Mexican Mythology W H PrescoTT
178
Origin and ProgrWB of Language Samuel G Howe
180
Zenobias Ambition William Ware
181
Trials of the Poet and the Scholar Geo S Hillard
183
The Yankees Samuel KeTTel 134
184
Custom of Whitewashing Francis Hofkinson
185
Same Subject continued Id
187
Same Subject concluded Id
188
The Force of Curiosity Charles Spraoue
191
The Winds W C BryanT
193
Daybreak Richard H Dana Sen
194
The Light of Home Mrs S J Hale
196
A Psalm of Life H W Longfellow
197
To the Condor E F ElleT
198
A Child carried away by an Eagle Professor Wilson
199
Same Subject concluded Id
201
Scene at the Dedication of a Heathen Temple William Ware
204
Same Subject continued Id
205
Same Subject concluded Id
206
Hamilton and Jay Dr Hawks
207
Adams and Jefferson Daniel WebsTer
209
The Destiny of our Republic G S Hillard
211
Posthumous Influence of the Wise and Good Anurews Norvon
212
Look Aloft J Lawrence Jr
213
Ode on War Wm H Burleioh
214
The Last Days of Autumn Henry Pickering
215
Man N Y Evening PosT
216
Passage down the Ohio James K Paulding
217
1J6 The Arsenal at Springfield H W Lonoehllow
267
Lisbon Pagr 177 The Ursa Ma or Henry Ware Jr
331
17a The Fate of Tyranny Mason
335
The Downfall of Poland Thomas Campbell
338
Napoleon at Rest John PierponT
339
Napoleon Bonaparte Jhanning
340
The Thunder Storm WashingTon Irving
342
Classical Learning Joseph STory
343
The BunkerHill Monument Daniel WebsTer
345
Appeal in Favor of the Union James Madison
346
France and England John c Calhoun
348
Military Insubordination Henry Clay
350
Loss of National Character PresidenT Maxcy
351
Lafayette and Napoleon E EvereTT
352
The Vision or Liberty Henry Ware Jr
354
Shakspeare Charles Spraoue
356
Speech of Rienzi to the Romans Miss Milford
357
Same Subject Thomas Moors
359
Guslavus Vasa to the Swedes Brooke
360
A Field of Battle Shelley
361
Resistance to Oppression PaTrick Henry
362
Duties of American Citizens Levi Woodbury
364
Political Corruption Geo MDuffie
366
Intelligence necessary to perpetuate Independence Judge Dawes
367
South American Republics Daniel WebsTer
368
Excellence of the Holy Scriptures Bealtie
370
Sir Anthony Absolute and Captain Ahsolute Slisndan
372
Antonys Address to the Roman Populace Shakspeare
375
The Victor Angels Milton
377
Impressment of American Seamen Henry Clay
378
New England what is she 1 TrisTam Bhrges
379
Parly Spirit William GasTon
381
Restless Spirit of Man Wilbur Fish
383
Rectitude of Character William WirT
385
Washington Daniel WebsTer
386
Public Faith Fisher Ames
388
Free Institutions favorable to Literature Edward EvereTT
390
The Study of Elocution necessary for a Preacher Prop Park
391
Relief of Revolutionary Officers MarTin Van Buren
393
Rapacity and Barbarity of a British Soldiery Wm LivingsTon
394
Free Navigation of the Mississippi Gouvernruk Morris
395
Our Duties to our Country Daniel WebsTer
397
England and the United States E EvereTT
399
Massachusetts and New York Gov Seward
402
The Bible Tos s Grimke
404
Fate of Montezuma Wm H PrescoTT
405
Scenery about Hassen Cleaver Hills John A Clark
407
The Treasure that Waxeth not Old D HunTingTon
409
The Young Mariners Dream Dimond
410
Guslavus Vasa and Crisliern Brooke
411
Tamerlane and Bajazet Rotoe
414
An Independent Judiciary James A Bayamd
417
Memorials of Washington and Franklin J Q Adams
419
Dialogue from Henry IV Shakspeare
421
231 The Love of Truth George PuTnam
424
Energy of the Will Thomas C Upham
425
The Scholars Mission George PuTnam
427

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Página 39 - Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Página 16 - No sooner had the Almighty ceased, but all The multitude of angels, with a shout Loud as from numbers without number, sweet As from blest voices, uttering joy...
Página 75 - And now I stand, and am judged for the hope of the promise made of God unto our fathers; unto which promise our twelve tribes, instantly serving God day and night, hope to come; for which hope's sake, King Agrippa I am accused of the Jews.
Página 364 - Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest; there is no retreat but in submission and slavery. Our chains- are forged ; their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston; the war is inevitable, and let it come; I repeat it, sir, — let it come! It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry peace, peace!
Página 76 - And I said, Who art thou, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. But rise, and stand upon thy feet: for I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee...
Página 377 - And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts. I am no orator, as Brutus is, But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him.
Página 363 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak — unable to cope with so formidable an adversary; but when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house ! Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?
Página 69 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks ; So he that doth redeem her thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities : But out upon this half-faced fellowship ! Wor.
Página 377 - I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men's blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know...
Página 197 - Tell me not, in mournful numbers, Life is but an empty dream! — For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal; Dust thou art, to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul.

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