The Treatment of Nature in English Poetry Between Pope and Wordsworth

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University of Chicago Press, 1896 - 290 páginas

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Página 107 - O Lady! we receive but what we give And in our life alone does Nature live: Ours is her wedding garment, ours her shroud! And would we aught behold of higher worth, Than that inanimate cold world allowed To the poor loveless ever-anxious crowd, Ah! from the soul itself must issue forth A light, a glory, a fair luminous cloud Enveloping the Earth...
Página 112 - Eternal Maker has ordain'd The powers of man; we feel within ourselves His energy divine; he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being; to be great like him, Beneficent and active. Thus the men Whom Nature's works can charm, with God himself Hold converse; grow familiar, day by day, With his conceptions, act upon his plan; And form to his, the relish of their souls.
Página 95 - Be full, ye courts ; be great who will : Search for peace with all your skill : Open wide the lofty door, Seek her on the marble floor. In vain...
Página 29 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Página 152 - All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all 'the dread magnificence of heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven ! X.
Página 2 - No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life ; for there is in London all that life can afford.
Página 223 - Arcadian plain. Pure stream, in whose transparent wave My youthful limbs I wont to lave ; No torrents stain thy limpid source, No rocks impede thy dimpling course, That sweetly warbles o'er its bed, With white round polished pebbles spread...
Página 139 - Who is like thee in heaven, light of the silent night ? The stars are ashamed in thy presence. They turn away their sparkling eyes. Whither dost thou retire from thy course, when the darkness of thy countenance grows ? Hast thou thy hall, like Ossian ? Dwellest thou in the shadow of grief?
Página 184 - Our trees rise in cones, globes and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissors upon every plant and bush. I do not know whether I am singular in my opinion, but, for my own part, I would rather look upon a tree in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure; and cannot but fancy that an orchard in flower looks infinitely more delightful than all the little labyrinths of the most finished parterre.
Página 111 - Saxon hands : 0 ye Northumbrian shades, which overlook The rocky pavement and the mossy falls Of solitary Wensbeck's limpid stream; How gladly I recall your well-known seats Beloved of old, and that delightful time When all alone, for many a summer's day, 1 wandered through your calm recesses, led In silence by some powerful hand unseen.

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