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Mr. Barnaby

Bradley
Cartier
Collins
Foster
Fowle
Freeman
James

Mr. Kingman

Kline
Lee
Leidlein
Mapes
Miller
Moriarty
Murtha

Mr. Newton

Putney
Rosenkrans
Scott, F. D.
Scott, G. G.
Snell
Taylor

Mr. Vanderwerp

Vaughan
Ward
Watkins
Weter
White
Wiggins

The President then addressed the Senate as follows:

Gentlemen of the Senate:

It is my desire at this time to convey to the people of Michigan my sincere appreciation of the honor conferred upon me by selecting me as the Lieutenant Governor of this great State.

By virtue of my office, it is my duty to preside over the deliberations of this body, and I feel that the State is fortunate in having as members of the Senate, men of experience and of such well-known ability as make up its membership at this time. I have no doubt that my association with you in this capacity will prove very instructive to me, and I trust that there may grow out of this relationship many warm friendships. It is true that there will be differences of opinion; that is one of the fortunate conditions of life, for without difference of opinion arousing the interest and study of the individual, much of the progress of the Nation and of the State would never have taken place. In

In that connection, I think it may be well for me at this time to say that I hope in the deliberations of this body there will be a free exchange of opinion among the members, and that the result of your deliberations will represent that which is best in the opinion of all after the questions at issue shall have been fairly discussed with the sole object of arriving at that which is best for the entire people of the State.

In the consideration of questions which come before you it is well to remember that the active interest and the proffered information and advice which will come to you from the outside will not at all times represent the desires of the major portion of your constituents, nor the welfare of the people at large. It is one of the unfortunate things with which we have to contend today that the great mass of the people rest in fancied security, while those who seek special privilege are the ones who are actively interested in the legislative affairs of the Nation and of the State.

The government of Michigan in its operation is like a great corporation, whose business cannot, because of the nature of things, be handled by the stockholders directly, but must be delegated to their servants and agents. You have been selected to act in the capacity of a board of directors. Many serious problems will come before you for action-problems in which the various interests will not all demand the same solution, and it will at all times be your duty to efface from your ininds in the consideration of these matters, your own individual interests or the particular interests of your constituency, and examine the question from that broader plane which shall bring into your perspective the entire State. Our agricultural resources, while they have received merited attention, are being developed possibly at a more rapid rate than any of the other resources of the State, and it is my opinion that the time is not very far distant when those sections of the State which, because of the character of their soil, have been believed to be of no agricultural value, will be made to produce liberally in response to the intelligent efforts of those who till the soil.

Our anufacturing activities, in some instances, at least, have, during the last few years, been the wonder of the manufacturing interests of the country. They have, because of their attractiveness, drawn the wealth of capital and labor from other pursuits.

Our mining interests cause this State to stand near the head of the states in that regard. They give employment to large numbers of laborers and yield most handsome returns to the holders of their securities.

It is only when all of these interests receive just and equitable treatment and are made to bear their just proportion of the public burden that we can hope to realize the largest measure of prosperity.

Each line of endeavor mentioned deserves the same fair and impartial consideration. While many of the great combinations of capital have taken advantage of the laws providing for their organization and control and for that reason deserve and should receive vigorous attention at the hands of our officers, that these abuses may be corrected, yet, in doing that, we should remember that in this day of industrial activity, great combinations of capital are necessary in order that we may conduct the affairs of our business life, and we should be careful in our efforts to regulate abuses, that we may not impair or destroy our industriai activity and thereby take away from the wage earner the opportunity of selling his labor continuously and to good advantage.

There are many questions of great importance for you to settle. The question of uniform taxation and the method of procedure which would enable us to bring about that very desirable result is one so broad and in which so many things must be considered that only those who give to it the careful and constant effort of years are able to meet and grasp the question understandingly.

The State institutions are constantly becoming of more importance and of correspondingly greater expense. In these and in the many other problems which will come before you, I know you will use that calm, good sense for which the American citizen is noted, and which your election here means that you possess.

In consideration of legislative matters we must keep in mind the growth and development which must take place in order that we may keep step with the line of progress. All things are progressive. If they were not, it would be unnecessary that this legislative session should be held, for the arrangements and provisions of yesterday would do for today. In contemplating future progress, and in providing adequately to meet the needs of this commonwealth, we shall do well to remember the sturdy oak, which, though not as pleasing to the fancy as some of its comrades, as they are swayed gracefully by every passing breeze, stands as a monument of stability, inspiring confidence, for after all, the greatest element of good which the people derive from government is the well merited confidence and security which it inspires.

Under the present constitution, the Lieutenant Governor has no voice in the deliberations of this body. It is his duty to stand in that calm and impartial attitude of the judge and give to each individual and measure an equal opportunity of being heard. That shall be my atti

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tude during this session of the legislature. The people have seleeted you to represent them in the making of the laws.

There is only one matter upon which I shall insist, and that is: That we work with all of the speed possible, keeping in mind the importance of the task to be performed. Much of the criticism of the legislatures of the past has come because of the length of time taken in their deliberations. Whether this criticism was just, I have no means of knowing, but I do believe that with the elimination of the many local questions formerly receiving attention at the hands of the legislature, we can make a record for brevity, with efficiency, of which we shall all be proud.

Now gentlemen, in conclusion, I trust that when we go back to render our report to the people who have commissioned us here, that they may, across the page of our achievement, with the pen of appreciation and with the golden ink of approval, write the words “Well Done.”

Gentlemen of the Senate what is your further pleasure ?

The following communication was read by the Secretary:

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Lansing, December 28, 1910.

Hon. Elbert V. Chilson, Secretary of Senate, 1909, Lansing, Michigan:

My Dear Sir:-In accordance with Section thirty-nine of Act No. 281 of 1909, I enclose herewith certified copies of the determination of the board of state canvassers, showing the duly nominated candidates for the office of United States Senator, of the Republican, Democratic, Prohibition and Socialist parties.

Very respectfully,
FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State.

STATE OF MICHIGAN,

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. .

WD THE UNDERSIGNED, state canvassers, from an examination of the election returns received by the Secretary of State, determine that, at the primary election held on the sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten,

CHARLES E. TOWNSEND

was duly nominated the candidate of the Republican party for United States Senator.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have hereto subscribed our names, át Lansing, this twenty-sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State,
ALBERT E. SLEEPER,

State Treasurer,
HUNTLEY RUSSELL,
Commissioner of the State Land Office.

Board of State Canvassers.

I, FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE, Secretary of State of the State of Michigan, hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the determination of the board of state canvassers, the original of which was filed in this office on the twenty-sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto affixed my

signature and the Great Seal of the State, (SEAL.)

at Lansing, this third day of January, in
the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred
eleven.
FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State.

STATE OF MICHIGAN,

DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

TVE THE UNDERSIGNED, state canvassers, from an examination of the election returns received by the Secretary of State, determine that, at the primary election held on the sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

JOHN T. WINSHIP

was duly nominated the candidate of the Democratic party for United States Senator.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have hereto subscribed our names, at Lansing, this twenty-sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State,
ALBERT E. SLEEPER,

State Treasurer,
HUNTLEY RUSSELL,
Commissioner of the State Land Office.

Board of State Canvassers.

I, FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE, Secretary of State of the State of Michigan, hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the determina

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tion of the board of state canvassers, the original of which was filed in this office on the twenty-sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto affixed my

signature and the Great Seal of the State, (SEAL.)

at Lansing, this third day of January, in
the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred
eleven.
FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State.

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WE THE UNDERSIGNED, state canvassers, from an examination of the election returns received by the Secretary of State, determine that, at the primary election held on the sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR

was duly nominated the candidate of the Prohibition party for United States Senator.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have hereto subscribed our names, at Lansing, this twenty-sixth day of September; nineteen hundred ten.

FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State,
ALBERT E. SLEEPER,

State Treasurer,
HUNTLEY RUSSELL,
Commissioner of the State Land Office.

Board of State Canvassers.

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I, FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE, Secretary of State of the State of Michigan, hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the determination of the board of state canvassers, the original of which was filed in this office on the twenty-sixth day of September, nineteen hundred ten.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto affixed my

signature and the Great Seal of the State, (SEAL.)

at Lansing, this third day of January, in
the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred
eleven.
FREDERICK C. MARTINDALE,

Secretary of State.

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