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GENERAL ORDER.

The motion prevailed.
The President called Mr. Kline to the chair.

After some time spent therein, the committee rose, and through its chairman made tlie following report:

The committee has had under consideration the following:
Senate joint resolution No. 2 (file No. 2), entitled

Joint resolution, ratifying the proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States, relative to the laying and collection of taxes on incomes :

Also
Senate bill No. 15 (file No. 10), entitled

A bill to amend Act No. 255 of the Public Acts of 1899, entitled, “An act to prevent trusts, monopolies and combinations of capital, skill or arts, to create or carry out restrictions in trade or commerce; to limit or reduce the production, or increase or reduce the price, of merchandise or any commodity; to prevent competition in manufacturing, making, transportation, sale or purchase of merchandise, produce or any commodity; to fix at any standard or figure, whereby its price to the public or consumer shall be in any manner controlled or established, any article or commodity of merchandise, produce or commerce intended for sale, barter, use or consumption," by inserting after section 11 thereof a new section to stand as section 11a;

Has made no amendments thereto, and has directed its chairman to report the same back to the Senate, and recommend their passage.

FRED B. KLINE,

Chairman. The report was accepted.

The bill and joint resolution were placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

THIRD READING OF BILLS.

Senate joint resolution No. 2 (file No. 2), entitled

Joint resolution, ratifying the proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States, relative to the laying and collection of taxes on incomes.

The joint resolution was then read a third time and passed, two-thirds of all the Senators elect voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

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The following is the joint resolution:

JOINT RESOLUTION, Ratifying the proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States, relative to the laying and collection of taxes on incomes.

Whereas, The Congress of the United States, after solemn and mature deliberation therein, has by a vote of two-thirds of both houses, passed a "Joint Resolution Proposing an Amendment to the Constitution of the United States,” which resolution is as follows:

“Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several states, shall be valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution:

Article XVI. The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several states, and without regard to any census or enumeration."

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Michigan, That in the name and in behalf of the people of this State, we do hereby ratify and assent to the said amendment.

Resolved further, That a copy of this ratification and assent be engrossed on parchment, and transmitted by His Excellency the Governor, to the United States in Congress assembled, and that he transmit a like copy to the Secretary of State of the United States.

Mr. White moved that the Senate adjourn.
The motion prevailed, the time being 3:35 o'clock, p. m.

The President declared the Senate adjourned until tomorrow at 2 o'clock p. m.

ELBERT V. CHILSON,
Secretary of the Senate.

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ELEVENTH DAY.

Lansing, Thursday, January 19, 1911.

2 o'clock p. m.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the President.

Religious exercises were conducted by Rev. Dr. Williamson, of Lansing.
The roll of the Senate was called by the Secretary.
The following Senators were present:

Messrs. Barnaby, Bradley, Cartier, Foster, Fowle, Freeman, james, Kingman, Kline, Lee, Leidlein, Mapes, Miller, Moriarty, Murtha, Newton, Putney, Rosenkrans, F. D. Scott, G. G. Scott, Taylor, Vanderwerp, Vaughan, Ward, Watkins, Weter, White, Wiggins28.

The following Senator was absent with leave: Mr. Walter--1.

The following Senators were absent without leave: Messrs. Collins and Snell-2.

Mr. F. D. Scott moved that the absentees without leave be excused from today's session.

The motion prevailed.

The President laid before the Senate the following telegram:

Washington, D. C., Jan. 18, 1911.

Hon. John Q. Ross, Lieut. Governor, Lansing, Michigan.

Kindly express to the Senators my deep appreciation of the great honor shown me today. I am profoundly grateful and shall take advantage of the first opportunity to thank you all personally.

CHAS. E. TOWNSEND. The telegram was ordered spread at large upon the Journal.

Messrs. Bradley, Freeman, Lee, Rosenkrans, Vaughan, Ward and White asked and obtained leaves of absence for themselves from tomorrow's session.

Mr. James asked and obtained leave of absence for himself from tomorrow's session and the sessions of next week.

Messrs. Foster, Kingman, Kline, G. G. Scott and Taylor asked and obtained leaves of absence for themselves from tomorrow's session and the session of Monday.

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS.

Mr. F. D. Scott offered the following resolution :
Senate resolution No. 30.

Whereas, In a majority of the states, wherein industrial and agricultural expositions, known as “State fairs," are held, such expositions or fairs are under the direct charge and supervision of the State government, and

Whereas, In the State of Michigan, such exposition and fair is controlled and operated by an organization which, while quasi-public, is in its operation, a private corporation,

Therefore, Be it resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that a committee of eight, consisting of three members of the Senate and five members of the House, be appointed to investigate the so-called “State Fair" and "Michigan State Agricultural Society”, and at the conclusion of such investigation, report to the Legislature of 1911 as to the manner in which such expositions and fairs have been managed and conducted in the past, by such society, and also as to the advisability of the State of Michigan acquiring property and buildings and conducting, managing and controlling an annual State fair in the future.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

Mr. Miller moved that the consideration of the resolution be made a Special Order for Tuesday, January 24, at 2:30 o'clock p. m.

The motion prevailed.

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Mr. F. D. Scott offered the following resolution :
Senate resolution No. 31.

Whereas, At the present time, in the Senate and in the House of Representatives, there are employed a number of boys under the age of sixteen years, and

Whereas, It has been the intent of the laws of the State of Michigan for years past, to preclude child labor or child employment, and to encourage and compel their attendance at school; Therefore be it

Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that all employees under the age of sixteen years in both houses of the Legislature be, and are hereby dismissed.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

Mr. F. D. Scott moved that the consideration of the resolution be made a Special Order for Tuesday, January 24, at 3 o'clock p. m.

Pending which

Mr. Bradley moved that the resolution be referred to the Committee on State Affairs.

The motion prevailed, and the resolution was so referred.

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