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But there were some hardy fellows

Keeping a bright look-out, Who had manned the life-boat long ago,

And launched her with a shout.

Out in the darkness, clinging

To broken mast and rope,
The ten were searching sea and sky,

With eyes that had no hope ;
And the moon made awful ridges

Of black against the clear, And the life-boat over the ridges

Came leaping like a deer!

Up spoke the life-boat coxswain

When they came near the wreck, “Who casts his life in this fierce sea

To carry a rope on deck ? " The men were all so willing

That they chose the first who spoke, And he plunged into the breathless pause,

Before a huge wave broke.

And the wave sprang like a panther,

And caught him by the neck; And tossed him, as you toss a ball,

Upon the shuddering wreck.
Faint, eager hands upheld him

Till he had got his breath,
And could make fast the blessed rope
A bridge to life from death!

There's many a precious cargo

Comes safe to British sands;
There's many a gallant fighting-man

About our British lands;
But I think our truest heroes

Are men with names unknown, Who save a priceless freight of lives,

And never heed their own.

Now bear those weary wanderers

From the dark shores below, And warm them at the hearths whose light,

They watched an hour ago ; And call the fishers and sailors

Gravely to see, and say, Our turn may come to-morrow,

As theirs has come to-day.”

Among the fishers and sailors

There came a sunburnt man,
And he stared at the little cabin-boy

Lying so white and wan;
Lying so white and speechless,

They thought his days were done: And the sailor stared and wrung his hands,

And cried, “ It is my son !

“Oh! I was bound for Plymouth,

And he for the coast of Spain,
But little I thought when we set sail

How we should meet again.

And who will tell his mother

How he is come ashore ?
For though I loved him very much,

I know she loved him more.

“I'll kiss his lips full gently

Before they are quite cold, And she shall take that kiss from mine

Ere this moon waxes old.” “Father !” the pale lips murmur,

“Is mother with you here?” The answer to these welcome words

Was a sob and then a cheer!

The captain spoke at midnight,

When he saw the tossing sky, “ Alas! a woeful night is this,

And a woeful man am I.
Glad am I for my wife,” he said,

“And glad for my true men ; But, alas for my little schooner,

She'll never sail agen!”

Now all you life-boat heroes,

Who reckon your lives so cheap, You banish tears from other homes, –

Make not your own to weep! You cannot die like lions,

For all you are so strong; While you are saving other lives,

God keep your own from wrong

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With eyes full of love,

That sparkle and gleam,
Through beautiful colours

That change like a dream ?

Think for a moment,

Look up to the sky;
Question your heart; it

Will answer the Why!
Bright as the glitter

Of beauty unfurl'd-
Boundless the Love that

Has fashioned the world!
From “ Good WORDS FOR THE YOUNG.

GARDENING. I ALWAYS like to see children fond of a garden, and I think that most children do like to see plants grow. But I fancy that you will like them all the better if you know a little more about them. So I am going to try and tell you something about the different parts of a plant.

First, about the root, which you will say is turning things topsy-turvy. You would begin with the flower. But I had rather begin with the root, the most useful part of the plant. Indeed, I ought almost say, the needful part. The root is the life of the plant. Did you ever cut some flowers, and stick them into the ground ? If you ever did, do you remember how soon they died ? Although every

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