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With his singer on the meadow Traced a winding pathway for it, Saying to it, “Run in this way !” From the red stone of the sluarry With his h ind he broke a from ent, Möulded it into a pipe-head, Shilped and fallioned it with figures; 20. From the mi, r. in of the liver Took a long recol for a pipe-st&m, With its dark green leaves upon it : Filled the pipe with bark of willāw ; With the birk of the red willow ; I}reathed upon th; neighbouring forest, Made its great bösighs chase together, Till in flame they burst and kindled ; And erect upon the mountains, Gitche Manito, the mighty, 30. Smoked the calumet. the Peace-Pine As a signal to the nations. And the souake rose slowly. slowly, Through the tranquil air of morning, First a single line of darkness, Then a denser, bluer vapour, Then a snow-white cloud unfölding, I.ike the tree-tóps of the forest, Jover rising, rising, rising. Till it touched the top of heaven, *C.Till it broke Ağinst the heaven, And rolled Ösit ward all around it. From the Vale of Tawasentha, From the Valley of Wyoming, From the groves of Tüscaloosa, From the Far-off Rocky Mountains, From the Northern lakes and rivers, All the tribes beheld the signal, Saw the distant smoke ascending, The Pukwana of the Peace-Pipe. 30. All the Prophets of the nations Said: “13ehold it, the I’ukwana: Iły this signal from afar off, IBending like a wand of willow, Wàving like a hand that beckons, Gitche. Manito, the mighty, Calls the tripes of men together Cails the worriors to his coincii!” Down the rivers, o'er the prairies, Came the warriors of the nations, to Came the IOelawares and Mohawks, Came the Choctaws and Camanches. Came the Shoshonies and I31ackfeet, Came the Piuwuees and Omawhaws, Came the Mandans and I) acotahs, Came the Hurons and Ojibways, All the warriors drawn together By the signal of the Peace-Pipe, To the Mountains of the Prairie, To the great Ited Pipe-stone Quarry. 70 old they stood there on the meadow, With their weapons and their wār-gãar, Painted like the leaves of Autumn, Painted like the sky of morning, Wildly gliring at each other; In their faces stern defiance, In their hearts the fetIdss of ages, The hereditary hatred, The ancestral thirst of vengeance. Gitche Manito, the mighty, 30. The Creator of the nations, Izooked upon them with compassion, With paternal love and prly : Izooked upon their wrath and wrāngling But as quarrels among children, But as feuds and fights of children: Over them he stretched his right hand, To subdue their stubborn natures, To allfly their thirst and fever, 13y the shadow of his right hand: Spake to them with voice majestic As the sound of far-off waters, Falling into ocep abysses, Warning, chsling, spake in this wise: – , “O my children : iny poor children: Listen to the words of wisdom,

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List on to the words of warning.
From the lips of the Great Spirit,
From the Master of Life, who made you:
“I have given you lands to hint in,
I have given you stroams to fish in,
I have given you lost and bison,
I have given you roe and reindeer,
I have given you brant and leaver,
Filled the marshes full of wild-foul,
Filled the rivers full of fishes :
Why then are you not contented 2
Why then will you hunt each other ?
“I am weary of your quarrels,
Weary of your wars and bloodshed.
Weary of your lo. for vengeance, .2.2.
Of your wronglong and dissensions;
All your strength is in your union,
All your danger is in discord:
Therefore be at peace henceforward,
And as lorothers live together.
‘... I will send a lorophet to you,
A Deliverer of thre nations.
Who shall guide you and shall teach you,
Who shall toil and suffer with you.
If you listen to his counsels,
You will milltiply and prosper;
If his warnings pass unheeded,
You will fade away and perish :
“IBatlle now in ihe stream before you,
Wash the war-paint from your faces,
Wash the blood-stains from your fingers,
IBury, your war-clubs and your weapons,
IBreak the red stone from this quarry,
Mould and make it into Peace-Pipes,
Take the recds that grow beside you,
Deck them with your brighest feathers,
Smoke the caluniet together,
And as brothers live henceforward"
Then upon the ground the warriors
Threw their cloaks and skirts of deer-skin,
Threw their weapons and their war-gear,
Leaped #:to the rushing river.

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| Washed the war-paint from their faces.

('lear above theni flowed the water,
('lear and limpid from the footprints Z4.4.
Of the Master of Life descending:
Dark below them flowed the water,
Soiled and stāined with streaks of crimson,
As if blood were mingled with it !
From the river came the warriors,
('lúan and washed from all their war-paint;
Qn the binks their clibs they buried,
Buried all their warlike weapons.
Gitchc Manito, the mighty,
The Great Spirit, the Creator, 23. "
Smiled upon his helpless children:
And in Silence all the warriors
Broke the red stone of the quarry,
Smoothed and formed it into Peace-Pipes,
Broke the long reeds by the river,
Decked them with their brightest feathers,
And departed each one home ward,
While the Master of Life, ascending,
Through the opening of cloud-curtains,

Tyrough the disorways of the heaven, , a. Witnished from before their faces,

In the Smoke that rolled around him, The Pukwana of the Peace-Pipe:

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! All your strength is in your union, ! All your danger is in discord:

Therefore be at peace henceforward,
And as lorothers live together.
‘... I will send a lorophet to you,
A I)eliverer of tire nations.
Who shall gusole you and shall teach you,
Who shall toil and suffer with you.
If you listen to his counsels,
You will multiply and prosper:
If his warnings pass unheeded.
You will fade away and perish :
“IBat he now in the stream before you,
Wash the war-paint from your faces,
Wash the blood-stains from your fingers,
Ibury your war-clubs and your weapons,
Iłreak the red stone from this quarry,
Mould and make it into Peace-Pipes,
Take the recds that grow beside you,
I)eck them with your brighest feathers,
Smoke the calunyot together,
And as brothers live hence forward '''
Then upon the ground the warriors
Threw their cloaks and skirts of deer-skin,
Threw their weapons and their war-gear,
Leaped in:to the rushing river,

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| Washed the war-paint from their faces.

('lear above theni flowed the water,
('lear and limpid from the footprints - Z4.4
Of the Master of Life descending:
I)ark below them flowed the water,
Soiled and stāined with streaks of crimson,
As if blood were mingled with it !
From the river came the warriors,
Clsan and washed from all their war-paint;
On the blinks their clips they buried,
Buried all their warlike weapons.
Gitche Manito, the mighty,
The Great Spirit, the Creator. ... "
Suniled upon his helpless children!
And in silence all the warriors
Broke the red stone of the quarry.
Smoothed and formed it into Peace-Pipes,
Broke the long reeds by the river.
Decked them with their brightest feathers,
And departetl each one hone ward,
While the Master of Life, ascending,
Through the opening of cloud-curtains,
Through the doorways of the heaven, 4.
Wisnished from before their faces. fa’,
In the Smoke that rolled around him,
The Pukwana of the Peuce-Pipe:

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And for föod the fishes served him. #. his blazing fire he sat there, arm and merry, eating, laughing, A3. Singing, “O Kabibonokka, You are but my fellow-mortal!” The Kabibonokka entered, And though Shingebis, the diver, Felt his presence by the coldness, Felt his icy breath upon him, Still he did not cease his singing, Still he did not leave his laughing, Qnly turned the log a little, Only made the fire burn brighter, sy. Made the ... fly up the smoke-flue. From Kabibonokka's forehead. From his snow-besprinkled tresses, Drops of sweat fell fast and heavy, Making dints upon the ashes, As along the Eaves of lodges As from drooping boughs of hemlock, Drips the melting snow in spring-time, Making hollows in the snow-drifts. Till at last he rose defeated, 206. Could not bear the heat and laughter, Could not bear the merry singing, But rushed headlong through the doorway Stamped upon the crusted snow-drifts, Stamped upon the lakes and rivers, Made the snow upon them harder, Made the ice upon them thicker, Challenged Shingebis, the diver, To come forth and wrestle with him, To come forth and wrestle naked &p. On the frozen fens and moorlands. Forth went Shingebis, the diver, Wrestled all night with the North-Wind Wrestled naked on the moorlands With the fierce Kabibonokka Till his } nting breath grew fainter, Till his frozen grasp grew feebler, Till he reeled and, staggered backward, And retreated, bāffled, běaten, To the kingdom of Wabasso, 4:2. To the land of the White Rabbit, Hearing still the gústy laughter, Hearing Shingebis, the diver, Singing, “O Kabibonokka, You are but my fellow-mortal!” Shawondasee, fit and låzy, Had his dwelling far to southward, In the drowsy, dreamy sunshine, In the never-ending summer. He it was who sent the wood-birds, 3.39.Sent the robin, the Opechee, Sent the blue-bird, the Owaissa, ,Sent the Shawshaw, sent the swallów, Sent the wild-goose, Yo: northward, Sent the mêlons and tobáccò, And the §. in purple clissters. From his pipe the smoke ascending Filled the sky with haze and vapour, Filled the air with dreamy softness, Gave a twinkle to the water, a. 246 Touched the rigged hills with smoothness, Brought the tender Indian summer, In the Moon when nights are otest, In the dreary Moon of Snow-shöes, Listless, careless Shawondasee : In his life he had one shadow, In his heart one sorrow had he. Once, as he was gazing northward, Far away upon a prairie, He beheld a maiden standing, 150. Saw a tall and slender maiden All alone upon a prairie. Brightest green were all her garments. And her hair was like the sunshine. o, by day he gazed upon her, Day by day he sighed with passion, Day by day his heart within him Grew more hot with love and longing . For the maid with yellow tresses. But he was too fat and lazy

To bestir himself and woo her; <&
Yes, too indolent and easy
To F. her and persuade her,
So he only gazed upon her.
Only sat and sished with passion
For the maiden of the prairie.
Till one morning, looking northward,
He beheld her yellow tresses
Changed and covered o'er with whiteness,
Covered as with whitest snow-flakes.
“Ah! my brother from the North-land, 27:
From the kingdom of Wabass
From the land of the White Rabbit!
You have stolen the maiden from me,
You have laid your hand upon her,
You have wooed and won my maideh
With your stories of the North-land ''
Thus the wretched Shawondasee
Breathed into the air his sorrow :
And the South-Wind o'er the prairie
Wandered warm with signs of passion, * 64
With the sighs of Shawondasee,
Till the air seemed full of snow-flakes,
Full of thistle-down the prairie,
And the maid with hair like sunshine
Vanished from his sight for ever;
Never more did Shawondasee
See the maid with yellow tresses!
Poor deluded Shawondasee :
'Twas no woman that you gazed at,
"Twas no maiden that you sighed for, <yo.
'Twas the prairie dandelion
That through all the dreamy Summer
You had gazed at with such longing,
You had sighed for with such passion,
And had pāffed away for ever,
Blöwn into the air with sighing.
Ah! deluded Shawondaseel
Thus the Four Winds were divided;
Thus the sons of Madjekeewis
Had their stations in the heavens, 3.x:
At the corners of the heavens:
For himself the West-Wind only
Kept the mighty Mudjekeewis.

III.

HIAWATHA'S CHILDHOOD.

DownwARD through the evening twilight,
In the days that are forgotten,
In the unremembered ages
From the full moon fell Nokomis,
Fell the beautiful Nokomis,
She a wife, but not a mother.
She was sporting with her women,
Swinging in a swing of grape-vines,
When her rival, the rejected,
Full of jealousy and hatred, f^,
Cut the leafy swing asunder,
Cut in twain the twisted grape-vines,
And Nokomis fell affrighted
Downward through the evening twilight,
On the Muskoday, the meadow,
On the prairie full of blossoms.
“See : a star falls.” said the people;
“From the sky a star is falling !'
There among the ferns and mosses,
There among the prairie lilies, 30.
On the Muskoday, the meadow,
In the moonlight and the starlight,
Fair Nokomis bore a daughter.
And she called her name Wenonah,
As the first-born of her daughters.
And the daughter of Nokomis
Grew up like the prairie lilies,
Grew a tall and slender maiden.
With the beauty of the moonlight,
With the beauty of the starlight. 30.
And Nokomis warned her often,
§§§ oft, and oft .#
“O, beware of Mudjekeewis:

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