The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra

Portada
University of Delaware Press, 2006 - 605 páginas
The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra follows the pattern of Marvin Rosenberg's four earlier Masks books and offers a sensitive interpretation of the play based on extensive reading of both literary criticism and performance reviews.
In the middle of this play of clashing values and great conflicting personalities, the unhappy Octavia - sister of the ambitious Octavius Caesar and newly married to the heroic Mark Anthony - sums up the ambiguity of her divided world in her heart-wrenching lament:
Husband win, win brother, Prays and destroys the prayer; no midway 'Twixt these extremes at all.
In his analysis, Marvin Rosenberg sets out to steer a path between the "extremes" of Rome and Egypt and all they stand for: and to explore the relentless "to and back" confrontation of their different sets of values which leads ultimately to destruction.
What his study reveals is a world of endless oppositions and ambiguities. Reason (policy and expediency) is pitted against emotion (love and enduring relationship); the personal and private is balanced against the public and universal; the human is juxtaposed with the divine, the heroic set against the mundane and petty. Great complex characters oppose each other and are divided within themselves, both on the wide stage of the world and within their own personalities. The language is full of antithesis and oxymorons: and the most magnificent poetry is placed alongside the most simple and moving of expressions.
 

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Contenido

Act I Scene i
41
Anthony
72
Cleopatra
82
Act I Scene ii
88
Act I Scene iii
106
Octavius
120
Act I Scene iv
125
Act I Scene v
135
Act III Scene xiii
295
Act Four
317
Act IV Scene i
319
Act IV Scene ii
322
Act IV Scene iii
328
Act IV Scene iv
331
Act IV Scene v
337
Act IV Scene vi
339

Act Two
145
Act II Scene i
147
Act II Scene ii
153
Act II Scene iii
176
Act II Scene iv
182
Act II Scene v
183
Act II Scene vi
199
Act II Scene vii
209
Act Three
227
Act III Scene i
229
Act III Scene ii
233
Act III Scene iii
241
Act III Scene iv
248
Act III Scene v
253
Act III Scene vi
256
Act III Scene vii
264
Act III Scenes viii ix and x
274
Act III Scene xi
280
Act III Scene xii
290
Act IV Scene vii
343
Act IV Scene viii
346
Act IV Scene ix
351
Act IV Scenes x xi xii and xiii
354
Act IV Scene xiv
364
Act IV Scene xv
381
Act Five
395
Act V Scene i
397
Act V Scene ii
405
Is Anthony and Cleopatra a Tragedy?
475
Epilogue
482
A Note on the Historical Cleopatra 69 BC30 BC
484
Critical and Theatrical Bibliographies
491
Critical Bibliography
493
Theatrical Bibliography
534
Tributes from Marvin Rosenbergs Colleagues and Friends
597
Index
599
Derechos de autor

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Página 24 - Our women are defective, and so sized, You'd think they were some of the guard disguised ; For to speak truth, men act, that are between Forty and fifty, wenches of fifteen ; With bone so large, and nerve so incompliant, When you call Desdemona, enter giant.

Acerca del autor (2006)

Marvin Rosenberg joined the Berkeley faculty in 1949, teaching first journalism and then Theatre Arts. He retired officially in 1983, but when he died in February 2003 he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies and still actively teaching and writing.

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