Beyond Garrison: Antislavery and Social Reform

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Cambridge University Press, 2005 M07 11 - 340 páginas
Why was Massachusetts one of the few Northern states to grant African-American males the right to vote? Why did it pass personal liberty laws, which helped protect fugitive slaves from federal authorities in the two decades immediately preceding the Civil War? Beyond Garrison finds answers to these important questions in unfamiliar and surprising places. Its protagonists are not the noble supporters of American abolitionism grouped around William Lloyd Garrison, but, rather, ordinary men and women in country towns and villages, encouraged by African-American activists throughout the state. Bruce Laurie's approach focuses on the politics of such antislavery advocates and demonstrates their leanings toward third-party politics. Bruce Laurie is currently Professor of History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is a member of the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Association. His articles and reviews have appeared in numerous collections of essays and in Labor History, Journal of Social History and Journal of American History. He is co-editor, with Milton Cantor, of Class, Sex and the Woman Worker (Greenwood Press, 1979) and co-editor with Eric Arnesen and Julie Greene of Labor Histories: Class, Politics, and the Working-Class Experience (University of Illinois Press, 1998). He is also the author of Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850 (Temple University Press, 1980), and Artisans into Workers: Labor in Nineteenth Century America (Hill & Wang, 1989).
 

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Acerca del autor (2005)

Bruce Laurie was born in Linden, NJ, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh in 1971. He did post-doctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania, and has held teaching positions at Mount Holyoke College and the University of Warwick. Professor Laurie has been honored with fellowships from the Carnegie Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Antiquarian Society. He has travelled to Western Europe, West Africa, the Caribbean, and Mexico. A member of the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Asociation, his articles and reviews have appeared in numerous collections of essays, as well as Labor History, Journal of Social History, and Journal of American History. He is a member of the editorial committee of Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, and is the co-editor of Class, Sex, and the Woman Worker (1979). He is also the author of Working People of Philadelphia, 1800-1850 (1980), and Artisans into Workers: Labor in Nineteenth-Century America (1989).

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