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Glasgow University Classics.

Q. HORATII FLACCI

OPERA

GLASGOW UNIVERSITY CLASSICS.

Xllustrated and Annotated Editions.

TEXT taken trom the best Authorities–ILLUSTRATIONS from the Antique.

NOTES selected from the first Commentators.

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VIRGILII OPERA,

WITH
NOTES by A. H. BRYCE, A.B. T.C.D.,
One of the Classical Masters in the High School of Edinburgh.

Text Illustrated Tulust. Test

Text. Notes. and Notes. Text. and Notes. BUCOLICA et GEORGICA, 100 28

88 ÆNEIS, I-VL,

10d 2s 38 ÆNEIS, VII.—XII., 10d Is 6d 23 6d ÆNEIS,

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PREFACE.

THE “NOTES ON HORACE" bave occupied the leisure of the Editor for several years. It is hoped that they will be found generally useful and trustworthy. They are based upon those of Orelli, Dillenburger, and Doering, and are intended to be to the School and College Student what those able Latin Commentaries are to the accomplished Scholar. Considerable assistance has been derived from the labours of Dr Anthon, Pemble, Macleane, Keightley, Heindorf, and others; but never, it is believed, in the case of original matter, without acknowledgment. Information has been obtained from many collateral sources, and incorporated with much that is believed to be original.

The Text followed is substantially that of Orelli, except in the spelling of a few words, such as baca, iam, Juppiter, volnus, volt, which have been changed into bacca, jam, Jupiter, vulnus, vult. The various readings have been given and explained, whenever they were judged of sufficient importance to merit notice; but difficulties have never been slurred over by adopting emendations.

All the Odes, &c., have been annotated; for, so long as complete editions may be had in abundance, expurgated editions, like other shams, will be productive of more injury than good. By presenting nothing but what is beautiful and worthy of remembrance, they excite an undue admiration in favour of the author, while they serve not merely to indicate the objectionable passages, but to invest them with an adventitious interest and favour. In this, as in other matters, the honest course is the best. Moreover, the works of Horace are a vivid history of the age in which he lived ; and just in proportion as they are mutilated, they fail to show what was written, read, and appreciated among a civilized people devoid of Christianity. Horace wrote nothing which was then considered beneath the dignity of a gentleman, though he may have written much which we ought not to admire.

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