The Case of the Educated Unemployed: An Address Delivered Before the Harvard Chapter of the Fraternity of the Phi Beta Kappa Society in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, June 25th, 1885

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Porter & Coates, 1885 - 31 páginas

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Página 29 - The debt which he owes to them is incalculable. They have guided him to truth. They have filled his mind with noble and graceful images. They have stood by him in all vicissitudes, comforters in sorrow, nurses in sickness, companions in solitude. These friendships are exposed to no danger from the occurrences by which other attachments are weakened or dissolved. Time glides on; fortune is inconstant; tempers are soured; bonds which seemed indissoluble are daily sundered by interest, by emulation,...
Página 29 - Just such is the feeling which a man of liberal education | naturally entertains towards the great minds of former ages. | The debt which he owes to them is incalculable. They have guided him to truth. | They have filled his mind with noble and graceful images. | They have stood by him in all vicissitudes, | comforters in sorrow, | nurses in sickness, | companions in solitude.
Página 21 - We cannot prove it as we can prove that the three angles of a triangle equal two right angles or that water is composed of two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen.
Página 4 - So long as the heathen in his blindness bows down to wood and stone we must have a number of communities that fall short of this ideal.
Página 6 - I may be permitted to recall the memories of my own youth, when both mind and body were curiously dealt with, when to handle a foil, an oar or a cricket bat met with grave head-shakes...
Página 29 - These are the old friends who are never seen with new faces, who are the same in wealth and in poverty, in glory and in obscurity. With the dead there is no rivalry. In the dead there is no change. Plato is never sullen. Cervantes is never petulant. Demosthenes never comes unseasonably. Dante never stays too long. No difference of political opinion can alienate Cicero. No heresy can excite the horror of Bossuet.

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