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to comfort, establish, and edify experienced Christians in the truth-and to promote practical piety and godliness.

JEDEDIAH CHAPMAN,
Minister of the Gospel at Geneva, State of New-York.

Extract from a review of Dr. BELLAMY's “ True Religion Deo

lineated," in the London Evangelical Magazine. “ The value of Dr. BELLAMY's writings is already well known to the religious world: but we are obliged to the Rev. AnDREW FULLER for his history and recommendation of this work: which, we hope, will introduce it to those per ons who are yet unacquainted with it. The Author's leading object is, to discriminate between the Law and the Gospel : and to define and illustrate the duties which they respectively require. We hope that the circulation of this volume will be as extensive as its contents are interesting and important; and that STUDENTS of DIVINITY especially, will avail themselves of the information which it contains.".

INEA

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Mr. Benedict's Sermon delivered at the Funeral of Mr. Bellamy,

9

Appendix to do.

SI

TRUE RELIGION DELINEATED, AND DISTINGUISHED FROM

ALL COUNTERFEITS-IN TWO DISCOURSES.

Preface,

45

The Author's Preface,

47

FIRST DISCOURSE.

True religion consists in a conformity to the law, and compliance with the

gospel.

53

The law requires us to love God with all our hearts, and our neighbour as

ourselves.

59

Love to God implies right apprehensions of him, and a sense of his amia-

bieness.

55

That we esteem him, so as to exult in his supremacy.

59

So value his honour and interest, as to be devoted to him,

61

So delight in him, as to live upon him as the portion of our souls.

63

Love to God takes its rise, originally from a sense of his infinite glory and

amiableness.

65

His infinite glory results from all his perfections.

67

All his perfections are manifested in his works.

69

And in his word.

92

A sense of his glory is imparted to the soul by tive immediate influence of the

Holy Spirit.

95

The infinite glory and amiableness of God lays us under such an obligation

to love God, as is binding, antecedently to any selfish consideration. 97

Infinitely,

99

Eternally,

107

And unchangeably.

108

And from hence all our other obligations to love and worship him as God,

originally derive their binding nature.

127

-A short view of our additional obligations to love God.

131

How they influence a true Saint.

135

True love distinguished from all counterfeits.

139

The law requires us to love God with all our hearts.

143

Making no allowances because of our disinclination.

144

But since it requires no more than all the heart, it is just and equal.

147

It being upon a level with our natural capacities.

148

And our inability to perfect holiness arises only from our badness,

149

Which badness we are voluntary in.

153

There is no reason why the law should be abated.

158

We are wholly to blame for not perfectly conforming to it.

159

Even the heathen are without excuse.

163

Much more inexcusable are those who enjoy the benefit of divine revelation. 170

God is under no natural obligations to grant supernatural advantages to any

of the children of men,

176

And may therefore act sovereignly in doing so.

ib.

Love to our neighbour implies esteem,

179

Benevolence,

181

And delight.

182

And is in its own nature right and fit.

183

And enjoined by the authority of God.

184

And recommended by the exaraple of God, in the exercises of his infinite

goodness towards the children of men.

185

And ought to be regulated agreeably to a true self-love.

186

And is always attended with true love to God.

187

It is a thing different from natural compassion.

188

From good humour.

ib.

From natural affection.

189

From party-spirited love.

190

From any love whatsoever, that arises merely from self-love.

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191

And from the love which enthusiasts and heretics have to one another.

-Love to God and our neighbour is a radical conformity to the whole law, 192

And lays the foundation for all true obedience,

ib.

And is that whereby true religion is distinguished from all counterfeits. 193

Which all arise from self-love,

194

From the whole, we may learn, what that image of God was, in which

Adam was created.

197

That we are born destitute thereof,

199

And naturally have a temper contrary thereto.

201

Which temper has the entire government of us.

208

So that all we do, while unregenerate, is sin.

229

And therefore our best doings cannot entitle us to any promise of special

grace.

223

-Conversion consists in our recovery from this sinful temper, to the moral

image of God, by the influences of the Holy Spirit.

226

And because we are naturally inclined to resist his influences with all our

might.

230

Therefore they must be such as we cannot resist, or we shall never be re-

covered.

237

Which effectual grace is dispensed according to God's sovereign good plea-

sure, and flows from his self-moving goodness.

238

And it is natural to suppose, that he who in such wise begins this work, will

carry it on, and so all true Saints persevere to the end.

242

That they must expect spiritual conflicts from remaining corruption. 244

Yet assuranee may be obtained.

247

These consequences are undeniable, if the premises, touching the nature of

the law, are true.

254

But if the law is abated and altered, the whole scheme is undermined. 255

And so is the whole gospel-revelation as much.

959

Or, if the law means something else than what is supposed.

261

But if the idea, which the Pelagians and Arminians have of God and the

law, is right, sin can deserve no punishment, in this world or the next. 262

Nor can the scriptures then be the word of God.

266

-Rules of trial.

267

The cause we have to be humble, and thankful, and live entirely devoted to

God.

276, 283, 285

The happiness of so doing.

287

Various questions occasionally considered in the first discourse.
Is it any matter what men's principles are, if their lives are but good ? 56
Will speculative ideas of God beget a sense of his amiableness, in a heart that
has no taste for moral beauty ?

57
Does all our enmity against God arise merely from our conceiving him to
be our enemy?

58

Are all things right, or wrong, merely because God wills them so to be? 80

Or merely because they do or do not tend to make us happy?

82

How was it consistent with God's goodness to permit sin?

92

Does perfect obedience deserve any thanks at the hands of God?

99

In what sense are our good works rewardable ?

100

Is sin an infinite evil ? and does it deserve an infinite punishment ?

105

Can future obedience make the least amends for past sins ?

107

Will the sinfulness and misery of the damned be forever increasing?

109

Is the law abated?

110, 144, 256

Or wholly repealed ?

115

What influence have false notions of the law on men's religion?

116

What do Antinomians make their rule of duty ?

118

Are the threatenings of the law in force ?

120

Can a man, nierely from self-love, love God more than himself ?

148

Is our impotency only moral?

144

Are we to blame for our spiritual blindness ?

148

Or for our corrupt nature ?

155

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What is it that brings awakened sinners to take all the blame to themselves,

and justify God! -

150

Do true believers feel themselves wholly to blame for not being perfectly holy? 168

Does God's withholding the sanctifying influences of his Holy Spirit lessen

our blame?

168

Why does the scripture, in some places, speak of the external advantages of

God's visible people, as being more than barely sufficient

for their becoming

good men, and as though their power was sufficient, although the sanctify-

ing influences of the Holy Spirit were withheld from them?

170

What is corrupt nature?

201

Is it natural or contracted?

202

Are the unregenerate entirely under the government of it?

203

Wherein does the sinfulness of it consist?

205

Why do not mankind see the sinfulness of it?

208

Do all actual sins proceed from it ?

211

Why are sinners so averse to the true knowledge of God, and so blind to his
beauty?

213

What is the nature of restraining grace?

216

How came our nature to be corrupted ?

219

What good does it do for sinners to use the means of grace ?

225, 423
What is the shortest and easiest method to bring the main controversies be-
tween Arminians and Calvinists to a final issue?

240, 254

How is the doctrine of perseverance consistent with all the cautions given to

believers, to take heed lest they fall ?

245

Is it a sin for believers ever to doubt of their good estate?

251

What is the most fundamental difference between the Arminians and Cal-

vinists ?

260

In what sense are wicked men ignorant of their own hearts? -

274

Why does a sight of the strictness of the law discourage hypocrites, and kill

their religion ?

282

Are believers ever as blind and dead, and as much without all spiritual

strength, as unbelievers ?

287

See also pages

228, 245, 272, 440, 448

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He was Alt to be a Mediator between God and man. -

366

Was authorized,

368

And what he has done is perfectly suited, in its own nature, to answer all the

ends proposed.

369

God may now, through Christ, consistently with his own honour, save

any that believe,

380

And use what means he pleases for the recovery of obstinate sinners.

388

A view of the methods of divine grace with mankind, from the beginning of

the world.

402

-A genuine compliance with the gospel.

426

Saving faith.

429

It results from divine light.

430

Which lays a foundation for a supernatural belief of the gospel.

431

Regeneration, faith, repentance, and conversion, connected together. - ib.

Spiritual light and true faith always in proportion.

Humility and true faith always in proportion.

433

What encourages the sinner to believe in CHRIST.

434

The act of faith defined.

436

Faith in Christ emboldens the humbled sinner to return to God, and trust in

him.

437

The various actings of faith distinguished.

ib

Faith and holiness always in proportion.

438

True faith, habitual, growing, and persevering.

440

The faith of the legal and of the evangelical hypocrite described. 442_

-The everlasting life promised to believers, implies the everlasting love

and favour of God, and the everlasting indwelling of the Holy Spirit as a

Sanctifier.

449-50

Of the spirit of adoption.

452

Of the seal and witness of the Spirit. -

250, 452

Of the marvellous change made by true conversion.

452

How faith iriterests us in CHRIST, and entitles us to life.
The Gospel-way of salvation perfectly adapted to make men holy. 460-61

Various questions occasionally considered in the second discourse.
What was implied in the death threatened to Adam?

301
What is the difference between the law of nature aad the first covenant ?

304, 320, 458
What is it that does most commonly convince men of the doctrine of origin-
al sin?

313

220, 814
Were we by the fall brought into a state of being worse than not to be? 332
Oughi we to be thankful for our beings?

333
Is it a blessing to have children?

336
What is the nature of satisfaction for sin ?

369
Does it render sin a less evil, or take away its natural ill desert ?

377
Does it move the divine compassion?

378
Are the elect, before faith, as much under the wrath of God as others, not-
withstanding the satisfaction of Christ ?

124, 378
Wherein consists our need of CHRIST, and when is it seen?

355--57
Why was Adam placed in a state of probation ?

359
Is a state of probation consistent with God's making his creatures' happiness
his last end?

362
Are all the comman mercies, which mankind enjoy, the effects of CHRIST's
merits?

390
In what sense did Christ die for all the world ?

ib.
And in what sense only for the elect?

391
Is a confirmed habit of grace before the first act of faith, or after ?

449
Does faith consist in believing that my sins are forgiven ? 125, 378, 444

45$

Why is original sin no oftener spoken of in scripture ?

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