Manual of the Turkish Bath: Heat, a Mode of Cure and a Source of Strength for Men and Animals

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John Fife
J. Churchill and Sons, 1865 - 419 páginas
 

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Página 360 - Let the solar rays fall upon a surface of sand ; the sand is heated, and finally radiates away as much heat as it receives ; let the same beams fall upon a forest, the quantity of heat given back is less than...
Página 361 - Leaving out of account the eruptions of volcanoes, and the ebb and flow of the tides, every mechanical action on the earth's surface, every manifestation of power, organic and inorganic, vital and physical, is produced by the sun. His warmth keeps the sea liquid, and the atmosphere a gas, and all the storms which agitate both are blown by the mechanical force of the sun. He lifts the rivers and the glaciers up to the mountains, and thus the cataract and the avalanche shoot with an energy derived...
Página 362 - The sun comes to us as heat, he quits us as heat, and between his entrance and departure the multiform powers of our globe appear. They are all special forms of solar power — the moulds into which his strength is temporarily poured, in passing from its source through infinitude.
Página 137 - ... will then be working more accessible beds at a smaller cost, and will be able to displace the English coal from every market. The question is, not how long our coal will endure before absolute exhaustion is effected, but how long will those particular coal-seams last which yield coal of a quality and at a price to enable this country to maintain her present supremacy in manufacturing industry.
Página 361 - I have said, the whole vegetable world, and through it the animal; the lilies of the field are his workmanship, the verdure of the meadows, and the cattle upon a thousand hills. He forms the muscles, he urges the blood, he builds the brain.
Página 138 - ... place by the common method of burning coal for culinary purposes. The simplest arrangements to confine the heat and concentrate it upon the operation to be performed, would suffice to obviate this reprehensible waste. So also in warming houses we consume in our open fires about five times as much coal as will produce the same heating effect when burnt in a close and properly constructed stove. Without sacrificing the luxury of a visible fire, it would be easy, by attending to the principles of...
Página 361 - Thunder and lightning are also his transmuted strength. Every fire that burns, and every flame that glows, dispenses light and heat which originally belonged to the sun. In these days, unhappily, the news of battle is familiar to us, but every shock and every charge is an application, or misapplication, of the mechanical force of the sun. He blows the trumpet, he urges the projectile, he bursts the bomb. "And remember this is not poetry, but rigid, mechanical truth. He rears, as I have said, the...
Página 361 - And as surely as the force which moves a clock's hands is derived from the arm which winds up the clock, so surely is all terrestrial power drawn from the sun. Leaving out of account the eruptions of volcanoes, and the ebb and flow of the tides, every mechanical action on the earth's surface, every manifestation of power, organic and inorganic, vital and physical, is produced by the...
Página 361 - He builds the forest and hews it down, the power which raised the tree, and which wields the axe, being one and the same. The clover sprouts and blossoms, and the scythe of the mower swings, by the operation of the same force. The sun digs the ore from our mines, he rolls the iron ; he rivets the plates, he boils the water ; he draws the train. He not only grows the cotton, but he spins the fibre and weaves the web. There is not a hammer raised, a wheel turned, or a shuttle thrown, that is not raised,...
Página 58 - He then causes a fire to be made in the furnace, which is kept burning until the stones which join the Temazcalli and furnace are quite hot. The person who is to use the bath enters, commonly naked, and generally accompanied for the sake of convenience or on account of infirmity by one of his domestics.

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