English Grammar: The English Language in Its Elements and Forms, with a History of Its Origin and Development : Designed for Use in Colleges and Schools

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Harper, 1873 - 796 páginas

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Contenido

Origin of the Ethnographical 68 Language before the coming
84
Names of the immigrating 75 Influence of the Norman Con
90
CHAPTER III
93
Specimens of AngloSaxon 93 80 Specimens of Old English
96
Specimens of SemiSaxon 95 83 Recapitulation
102
CHAPTER V
109
Section
124
CHAPTER VI
130
Pronounceable Combina 135 Importance of the Fact first
132
Expressiveness 133 107 Historical Analysis
138
049
145
ments
148
Explanation of the Table of 129 Phonetic Elements not
154
tions
156
Section
159
Principles of Division 161 144 Monosyllabic Character
163
Page Section Page
165
CHAPTER V
169
2
172
Definitions 173 163 Vowel Changes
175
THE NATURAL SIGNIFICANCY OF ARTICULATE SOUNDS
182
Section
189
18
195
PART III
199
Vowel LettersA 204 197 Consonant LettersK
205
G 209 208 Z
212
DEFECTS OF THE ENGLISH ALPHABET
214
Greek Alphabet 2181 the Character used
220
Different Plans of Reform 225 234 Change of Pronunciation
230
ETYMOLOGICAL FORMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
237
Classification of Nouns 242 246 Additional Facts
244
English Gender Poetic 247 Nouns
249
Formation of the Plural 249 Saxon Genitive
251
Double Forms of the Plural 251 261 Number of Cases
257
Foreign Words 251 262 Import of the Genitive
258
Additional Statements 252 263 Comparative Etymology
259
Comparative Etymology 254 264 Difference between Ancient 256 Cases of Nouns 255 and Modern Languages
260
THE ADJECTIVE 265 The Adjective 263 275 Comparison by Intensive 266 Classification
263
Words 26
264
Other Classifications 264 276 Adjectives not admitting
267
Derivation of Adjectives 265 Comparison
270
Comparison of Adjectives 266 277 Comparative Etymology
271
Compound Comparison 266 280 Classification
272
Irregular Comparison 267 281 Compound Numerals
273
THE ARTICLE 283 The Article 275 285 The Article an or a
275
Relation of the Articles to 286 The Article the
276
CHAPTER V
278
The Pronoun 278296 Pronouns of the first Person
279
Unity
283
Value of Pronouns 279 298 Pronouns of the second Per 292 Personal Pronouns son
284
Auxiliary Verbs 318 360 Defective Verbs
356
Law of Convertibility in
358
Adverbs
361
CHAPTER VIII
369
Conjunctions 374 378 Office of Conjunctions
376
CHAPTER XI
384
Instinctive Forms and Pro 394 Teutonic Compounds
400
Latin Stemadjectives 408 Origin 443
402
Teutonic Stemnouns 390 397 Natural Development of
406
Terms
442
Latin secondary Derivatives 411 422 Illusive Etymologies
449
Romanic Portion of our Lan 425 Local Surnames
455
Hebrew or Phænician 436 Names of the Months
461
LOGICAL FORMS
467
Predicables 472 Physical
476
The Proposition 481 460 Relation of the Proposition
482
The Parts of a Proposition 461 Parts of Speech which com
491
CHAPTER 1
495
Argument 496 471 Dilemma
502
Sorites
508
SYNTAX OF THE SUBSTANTIVE
517
Section Page 1 Section Page
527
Attributive Relation of the 489 Promiscuous Exercises
533
Syntax of the Adjective 535 495 Syntax of the Indefinite
548
Syntax of Pronominal Ad 497 Promiscuous Exercises
555
The End aimed at 661 567 The Interference of Rhet
559
Personal Pronouns 557 502 Relative Pronouns
569
Syntax of the word Self 503 Interrogative Pronouns
577
The Verb 584 516
584
Collocation 588 519 Syntax of Tenses
601
CHAPTER VI
609
Syntax of Prepositions 614 527 Collocation of Prepositions
617
CHAPTER IX
629
Syntax of Compound Sen 540 Grammatical Equivalents
641
RHETORICAL FORMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
657
Distinct and Vivid Concep
663
A strong Desire to express 569 Rules for the Use of Figures
669
Elegiac Heroics 737 679 Hallelujah Metre 740
670
Anagram
675
Anticlimax
681
Ecphonesis or Exclama 603 Proverb
690
CHAPTER IV
697
PRELIMINARY STATEMENTS
709
Measures
719
TROCHAIC MEASURES
727
AMPHIBRACH MEASURES
733
Ottava Rima
738
The Colon 749 695 The Long and Short Vowel
753
339
756

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