An introductory lecture on political economy. To which is added a syllabus of a course of lectures on the wages of labor

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Página 41 - I call therefore a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Página 31 - We must get comprehensive views of facts, that we may arrive at principles which are truly comprehensive. If we take a different method, if we snatch at general principles, and content ourselves with confined observations, two things will happen to us. First, what we call general principles will often be found to have no generality; we shall set out with declaring propositions...
Página 32 - ... political elements which arise out of this mutual connection : and all this surely is knowledge well worth gaining, independently of the ultimate reward of our researches, — the grasping those simple and commanding truths, which really apply to wages and rents under all their shapes and varieties. And, gentlemen, if we will not take this trouble ; if we will be closet philosophers, take a peep out of our little window, and fashion a world of our own after the pattern of what we see thence,...
Página 12 - Production must, of course, practically precede distribution: but, although some wealth must be produced before any can be distributed, yet the forms and modes of distributing the produce of their lands and labor, adopted in the early stages of a people's progress, exercise an influence over the character and habits of communities...
Página 22 - ... in feeding and employing the laboring population. An accurate knowledge of that structure can alone give us the key to the past fortunes of the different people of the earth, by displaying their economical anatomy, and showing thus, the most deeply-seated sources of their strength, the elements of their institutions, and causes of their habits and character. It is thus we must learn the circumstances which divide them into classes...
Página 33 - ... of facts, necessary to illustrate principles of which the importance has only lately become known, we should toil through her pages in vain. Yet this defect does not always exist when we think it does. The compiler and the student are sometimes more to blame than the original historian. The labors of Niebuhr, Savigny, Heeren, Miiller, have proved that there is much knowledge, most important to our subject, in historical records, which has faded from the minds of men, and must be laboriously recovered...
Página 22 - By the economical structure of nations, I mean those relations between the different classes which are established in the first instance by the institution of property in the soil, and by the distribution of its surplus produce; afterwards modified and changed (to a greater or lesser extent) by the introduction of capitalists as agents in producing and exchanging wealth and in feeding and employing the working population.
Página 19 - ... important change has also taken place, and that is, a change in the ties which connect the different classes of society. An intermediate class appears between the landowners and a portion of the non-agriculturists, upon which intermediate class, those non-agriculturists are dependent for employment and subsistence. The ties which formerly bound the community together are worn out and fall to pieces ; other bonds, other principles of cohesion connect its different classes; new economical relations...
Página 22 - I say that, by the economical structure of nations, I mean those relations between the different classes which are established in the first instance by the institution of property in the soil, and by the distribution of its surplus produce; afterwards modified and changed (to a greater or...
Página 13 - some wealth must be produced before any can be distributed, yet the forms and modes of distributing the produce of their lands and labour, adopted in the early stages of a people's progress, exercise an influence over the character and habits of communities which can be traced for ages; . . . and this influence must be understood, and allowed for, before we can adequately explain existing differences in the productive powers and operations of different nations.

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