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GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS,

WITE

PROGRESSIVE EXERCISES.

BY

WALTER SCOTT DALGLEISH, M.A. EDIN.,

VICE-PRINCIPAL OF DREGHORN COLLEGE

AUTHOR OF “ENGLISH COMPOSITION IN PROSE AND VERBE."

a

THIRD EDITION, REVISED.

2004.

vos

ILOITS

EDINBURGH :
OLIVER AND BOYD, TWEEDDALE COURT.
LONDON : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

1866.

PRICE NINEPENCE.

302.g. 16.

Now ready, Fourth Edition, 2s. 6d.
ENGLISH COMPOSITION IN PROSE AND VERSE,

BASED ON GRAMMATICAL SYNTHESIS.
By W. Scott DALGLEISH, M.A., Vice-Principal of Dreghorn College.

“The treatise is evidently, for the purposes of elementary instruction, at once the most practical and the most scientific exposition that we have yet had." — Professor Craik.

A KEY to the Work, price 23. 6d., is now published.

Edinburgh: OLIVER AND Boyd.
London : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND Co.

FRINTED BY OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGE.

PREFACE.

This textbook of Grammatical Analysis has been prepared as an introduction to the Author's “ English Composition,” and in order to supply a full exposition of the principles of Analysis, in harmony with the system of Grammatical Synthesis on which that work is based. At the same time, the acknowledged importance of the subject, in its bearing directly on the study of English, and indirectly on that of other languages, seemed to warrant its treatment in a separate work, specially adapted for class teaching.

He has aimed throughout at securing two qualities,-simplicity and exhaustiveness: he has endeavoured to reduce the principles of analysis to the smallest number possible; and at the same time to afford explanations of every peculiarity of construction, and every variety of sentence.

With this view, the following features have been introduced :1. The Terms of every sentence, simple, complex, and

compound,--are named according to their functions, not according to the parts of speech which they contain.

Thus, 2. A similarity is preserved between the Terms of simple

sentences, which are either single words or phrases, and the Terms of complex and compound sentences, which are Clauses : e.g., an Attributive word or phrase in the simple sentence becomes an Attributive clause in

the complex sentenco. 3. The Complement is distinguished from the Compound

Object, and is made to include what is commonly called

the Infinitive Object. 4. Particular attention has been paid to the force of Con

junctions and other Connectives, in determining the nature of the clauses they introduce; and a Note has been added in the Appendix, explaining the cases of certain connective words which are employed to intro

duce clauses of different kinds. 5. The Analytic Notation, first employed in the Author's

“ English Composition,” is fully explained, and wrought

into the system of analysis. 6. Copious examples for Analysis have been introduced in

the Exercises,—all of them from standard authors. These will also afford excellent examples for Parsing.

No one can write a work on Analysis without coming under obligations to Dr J. D. Morell, whose works first called attention in this country to the subject as applied to the mother tongue. The Author has also to acknowledge several useful hints received from Professor Bain's “English Grammar," and from Dr Ernest Adams's "Elements of the English Language.”

W. S. D.

DREGHORN COLLEGE, January 1865.

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