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Patent Agents and Solicitors.
Patents, Trade Marks, Designs and Copyrights

OFFICES:
No. 203 Broadway, New York, N.
No. 1003 F Street, Washington, D

secured in all Countries.

Y.

C.

CABLE ADDRESSES:
New York: "Richpatent, Newyork."
Washington:

" Richards, Washington."
A B. C. CODE-4TH EDITION.
TELEPHONE, 4708 CORTLANDT.

New York, August 12, 1896.

ADDENDA No. 4.

CUATEMALA.

PATENTS. a Cent mal-American exposition, in which may be exhibited foreign products

Upon the 15th of March, 1897, will be opened in the city of Guatemala and inventions. There will be premiums consisting of diplomas, gold, silver and copper medals, as well as cash prizes.

It should also be noted that goods destined for the exhibition will be admitted free of duty.

Further, upon the request of the committee that organized the exposition, the Legislature has passed a decree or law which declares that all objects or inventions that are exhibited during the exhibition will be considered as patented during the exhibition and for three months after the same shall have closed. A translaton of the text of this decree is as follows:

THE NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE REPUBLIC AT GUATEMALA,

this edge and went so that

DECREES,
Central-Amer

Article 1. All inventions or objects presented that being patented abroad are exhibited in the the Exhibition

Ican Exposition, are considered as patented in the Republic from the day upon whicle Article 2.

bens, until three months after its closing comprehended

The mentioneal three months in the terms of the law of patents and privileges, and the patent is applied for in the

inventions or objects may be patented in Guatemala if they may be established in ag

Ollowing the closure of the Exposition, or while it is open, observing the provisions Article 3.

id law, in the conception of which these patents shall not pay any tax. trade marks the

at figure in the Exposition within the terms tixed by Article i, Passed to

Shall be considered equally deposited and for the effeets of the Penal Code, the

the Executive for publication, and
Given in the Palace of the Legislative Power, in Guatemala, the 25th of April, 1896.

MARIANO CRUZ, President.
F.C. CASTA SEDA, Secretary,
Palace of th

RAFAEL SPOLA, Secretary.
Comply an
Executive Power: Guatemala, April 30, 1896.

JOSÉ MARIA REINA BARRIOS.
THE SECRR
MANUEL M

STATE IN THE DEPARTMEN

EXT OF FOMENTO.
TARY OF
VRALE
Valan agent has been appointed by the

government one of the He will extend to

clients our

any
of this exposition.

in
securing space, obtaining the

patents, and, position, in supervising the displaying and exhibition of ex

for the above services will be made the subject of special ach case, all contracts for same to be closed before the opening

Publish:

T.

as

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Our Guat
commissioners
sistance in
during the e
hibits, Terms
agreement in
of the expositi on.

is power,

Apply a Wittle gum or pass

NOTICE.

Please note for future use, should occasion arise, that our Mr. William
Evarts Richards has been appointed:

Consul, at New York, of the Republic of Paraguay;
Commissioner of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland;
Commissioner of the Supreme Court of the Cape of Good Hope.

Richards

We Compute Foreign Currencies as follows: £1=$4.87; 1 Franc=19 3-10 Cents:

1 Mark=23 8-10 Cents.

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Opposition to the grant of patents in this country, particularly where the subject matter of the invention relates to miiing processes or apparatus, seems to be more and more frequent, the protest usually coming from either the Witwatersrand Chamber of Mines, the Rand Central Ore Reduction Company (owner of the Julian patents), or the African Gold Recovery Company (owner of the MacArthur-Forest patents). These companies have large capital, employ skillful counsel, and press their oppositions earnestly and persistently, so that applicants engaged in a contest with them can take no chances, but must prosecute their cases skillfully, otherwise they are certain to lose their causes.

We believe the following explanation regarding oppositions will be of service to our correspondents. We copy much of it from a circular letter recently received from our own correspondent in that country.

The complete specification having been filed at the Registrar's office, the law allows but six months within which oppositions shall be heard and the case finally decided; or, where the delay is not due to any fault of the applicant, seven months. Immediately after filing, a notice is obtained from the Registrar which is required by the law to be published in the South African Republic, and also at or near the applicant's domicile, or where he uses his invention, calling upon all who are interested in objecting to the granting of a patent, to file their protest before a date that is specified in that notice. This date is usually within a couple of months of the limit of time for the final decision of the case (the six or seven months above referred to), so that, if the applicant be a resident of a foreign country, it is almost impossible to communicate to him the grounds of objection and receive his reply in time to meet the opposition, and complete the application within the six or seven months term.

It is almost essential, therefore, that the agent be instructed, in case opposition arises, to cable information of the fact, and in turn to cable the agent his instructions if he is to contest the opposition, otherwise either the opposition may be uncontested and the opponents will defeat the application, or the application may be lost because it has not been finally decided within the legal limit of time; for no extension of time is possible, under any circumstances, or for any reason.

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The cases are heard by the Attorney-general who is a barrister, and not an authority on chemistry, mechanics, or in any other science or art. It is important, therefore, that the services of experts be engaged as well as those of the most able counsel, to argue the case before him.

Any other presenta. tion of the applicant's case will be almost certain to result in failure.

The cost of contesting defending opposition properly usually amounts to $400 to $750. If unsuccessful, a like sum may probably have to be paid the opponents for their costs, but this is proportionately more or less according to the nature and duration of the case.

If successful $250 to $350 will usually cover all costs,

as the special fees (generally £26.5.0 each) paid to expert counsel and witnesses are not

recoverable against the opponents,

It is expected that in future foreign apnor the attorney and client costs. plicants will be required to give security for costs, as in many cases where

been unable to recover. the opponents were successful they have

We should mention that in a draft Patent Law to be submitted to the Volksraad during the current session, porvision is made for extending the time, in case of opposition, to 15 months or longer, according to the necessities of the case. This provision may or may

not be enacted.

NOTICE.
Please note for future use, should occasion arise, that our Mr. William
Evarts Richards has been appointed:

Consul, at New York, of the Republic of Paraguay;
Commissioner of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland;
Commissioner of the Supreme Court of the Cape of Good Hope.

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We Compute Foreign Currencies as follows: £1=$4.87; 1 Franc=19 3-10 Cents:

1 Mark=23 8-10 Cents.

Patent Agents and Solicitors.

Patents, Trade Marks, Designs and Copyrights

secured in all Countries.

OFFICES:
No. 203 Broadway, New York, N. Y.
No. 1008 F Street, Washington, D. C.

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The patent law has just been amended. The term of patents has been fixed at 15 years, limited, however, to the term of any prior foreign patent having a shorter duration; reissues are now provided for, and several reissued patents may be issued for separate and distinct parts of a single original patent; and patents may now be issued and reissued in the name of an assignee of record, although applications for original patents must be signed by the inventor, who, if living, must also sign the application for reissue. The full text of the amending act is as follows:

SUBSTITUTE SENATE BILL No. 20. AN ACT to amend Sections 2 and 3 of an Act entitled “An Act to Regulate the Issuing of Patents,” approved August 29, 1884, and to add two new sections to said act, as amended by an act entitled “ An Act to amend An Act Regulating the Issuing of Patents," approved the 23.1 day of June, 1888, to be called sections 15 and 16.

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the Republic of Hawaii:

SECTION 1. That Section 2 of an Act entitled “ An Act to regulate the issuing of Patents," approved August 29, 1881, is hereby amended by striking out the word “ten” and inserting in its place the word “fifteen,” so that said Section as amended shall read as follows:

“Section 2. Every patent shall contain a short title or description of the invention or discovery, correctly indicating its nature and design, and a grant to the patentee, his heirs or assigns, for the term of fifteen years, of the exclusive right to make, use and vend the invention or discovery throughout the Hawaiian Islands, referring to the specifications for the particulars thereof. A copy of the specifications and drawings shall be annexed to the patent and be a part thereof."

SECTION 2. That Section 3 of an Act entitled " An Act to regulate the issuing of Patents," approved August 29, 1884, is hereby amended by striking out the word “ten” and inserting in its place the Ford “fifteen," so that said section as amended shall read as follows:

“Section 3. Any person who has invented or discovered any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, process or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof not known or used by others in this country, and not patented (or described in any printed publication) in this or any foreign country before his invention or discovery thereof, may, upon payment of the fees required by law, and other due proceedings had, obtain a patent therefor; provided, however, that any person who has invented or discovered any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, process or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, and has received a patent or patents therefor from any foreign government, may also obtain a patent therefor in this country as provided above, unless the thing patented has been introduced into public use in the Hawaiian Islands for more than one year prior to the application for a patent. But every patent granted for an invention which has been previously patented in a foreign country shall be so limited that it shall not continue longer than the time of the expiration of such foreign patent, or if there are several foreign patents, it shall not continue longer than the time of the expiration of the one with the shortest unexpired term, and in no case shall it be in force more than fifteen years.”

SECTION 3. That a new Section to said Act, as amended by the Act entitled, “ An Act to amend an Act to regulate the issuing of Patents,” approved June 23d, 1838, be added, to be called Section 15.

" Section 15. Whenever any patent is inoperative or invalid, by reason of a defective or insufficient specification, or by reason of the patentee claiming as his own invention or discovery more than he had a right to claim as new, if the error has arisen by inadvertence, accident or mistake, and

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