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PRACTICAL VIEW

OF

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

IN ITS

EARLIEST STAGES.

BY T. BABINGTON, Esq.
MEMBER OF THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT.

Fárst American

FROM THE THIRD LONDON EDITION.

To which are added

TRANSLATIONS OF THE LATIN SENTENCES

AND NOTES.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY CUMMINGS AND HILLIARD,

BOSTON BOOKSTORE, NO. 1, CORNHILL.

/57. Qaril.es

LC 361 .Ball 1818

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

MONROE C. GUTMAN LIBRARY

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT :

District Clerk's Office. mind Be it remembered, that on the twentieth day of April, Deat. { A.D. 1818, and in the forty second year

of the IndependXamma

ence of the United States of America, CUMMINGS AND

HILLIARD, of the said district, have deposited in this Office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit :-"A Practical View of Christian Education in its earliest stages. By T. Babington, Esq. Member of the British Parliament. First American, from the third London Edie tion; to which are added Translations of the Latin sentences, and potes." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned :" and also to an act entitled, “ An act supplementary to an act, entitled, An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other prints." JOHN W. Davis, Massachusetts.

Clerk of the District

Flagg & Gould, printers,

PREFACE

TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

The following work, though it has hitherto appeared without the Author's name, is well known to be the production of a Member of the British Parliament, who, to the speculations of a correct mind, ap. pears to have added the result of sound experience. Having been successful in the education and government of a numerous family of children, till they became heads of families themselves, at their request, and for their benefit especially, he prepared this View of Christian Education. The work, after coming under the public eye, met with so favourable a reception, that within a short period it passed through three editions. The writer of this article, having access to a copy of it through the kindness of a friend, has carefully perused it, and is free to say, that, with merited reproof, he has also experienced instruction and delight. He views the noble author as laying for the foundation of his superstructure those excellent principles, which will bear the test of that awfully interesting day, when every man's work must be tried by the fire of eternal truth. Upon this foundation he appears to have built wisely and discreetly; and his rules, though somewhat general, yet if as faithfully reduced to practice, as they are valuable in their tendency, it is believed, would greatly ameliorate the condition of many a family.. It will be perceived by the attentive reader, that the Author is a member of the Episcopal Church; but the unprejudiced mind will always be delighted with the pure waters of truth, whether derived from an artificial fountain, or from a natural spring. A leading excellency of the following work is, that all along it appears to have the future, eternal well-being of the child in view, in its education, no less, than its temporal usefulness and happiness. To the aitainment of these ends we are guided by instructions, which accord with the true spirit of the holy Scriptores.

What is said upon the subject of rewards and punishments, is worthy to be repeatedly read, and with close attention. Some, perhaps, will object to · what is said upon the subject of emulation. The word, emulation, has been so much used to signify a virtuous principle, or at least a principle generally esteemed virtuous, that many may be startled to hear the Author dissuade parents from encouraging it in their children. But even what he says upon this principle, if carefully examined, will be found to be very just. By emulation he means that selfish principle, by which we are stimulated to excel others for the name of excelling; and not that principle, through which we are animated by the example of others to

do as well as possible, that we may be the more useful. Under the influence of the former principle, if we surpass our competitors, we triumph at their expense ; and if we are surpassed, we envy them; such a principle ought to be discouraged. Under the influence of the latter, though animated to do our best, we shall even rejoice, if others do better.

Though the writer of this is by no means pleased with the practice of taking great liberties with the works of others, he thinks a very few verbal alterations might be admitted with advantage.

For the sake of the unlearned reader, and to render the work more extensively useful, a few Latin sentences in it, are in this edition accompanied with a free translation,

It may be seen, that the following pages are adapted especially to the use of those families, which move in the higher circles of life; but they contain much, that may be interesting and useful to those in humble stations.

With these brief remarks the work is presented to the American public, with a desire that it may receive a patronage in some good measure proportion. ed to its intrinsic value,

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