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$925,000

134,000

5,000

5,000

250,000
75,000

75,000

30,000

Pepeekeo Plantation. $ 600,000

$400,000

*$200,000 Lihue Plantation..... 1,400,000

$475,000 Pioneer Mill........ 500,000 250,000

250,000 W. Y. Horner........ 150,000 150,000 Grove Farm Plantat'n 250,000 250,000 Hanamaulu Plantat'n 150,000 150,000 Kekaha Sugar Mill.... 200.000 66,000 Meier & Kruse ..... 75,000

75,000 H. P. Faye & Co... 40,000

140,000 Kaluahonu Co...

10,000 J. N. Wright ...

50,000 R. M. Overend....

80,000 80,000 Kukaiau Mill.

170,000 85,000 85,000 Hamakua Plantation. 200,000

200,000 Niulii Mill and Plan.. 200,000

200,000 Puehuehu Plant'n Co. 70,000

70,000 Hawi Mill and Plant'n 250,000

250,000 Beecroft Plantation... 60,000

60,000 Kamaloo Plantation.. 40,000

40,000 Paauhau Plantation.. 500,000

250,000 Huelo Plantation..... 150.000

150,000 Laie Plantation....... 75,000 Halawa Plantation.... 150,000

150,000 J. M. Horner & Sons.. 75,000 T. Broderick

30,000 W. H. Purvis & Co.... 75,000

75,000 W. H. Rickard

50,000

50,000 Eleele Plantation..... 200.000

100,000 Waialua Plantation... 250,000

250,000 A. H. Smith & Co...

40,000 40,000 Kaneohe Plantation .. 150,000 150,000

.......... Totals...

$6,205,000 $2,631,000 $2,330,000 $1,039,000 $240,000 Note.— * Indicates Chinese owners; t Norwegian.

The following is a statement of the amount of sugar interests in Hawaii credited to each nationality: American ........................................................................ $24,664,610 British .................................****

........... 5,824,730 German .............. ............................................................. 1,835,800 Native Hawaiian..................

254,350 Chinese ........

236,900

40,000 Portuguese .................

38,500 Chilean ....................

....... 6,400 Total

$32,800,990

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THE HAWAIIAN TRADE. “The merchandise trade between San Francisco and the Hawaiian Islands - exports and imports - during the first five months of 1892 was as follows:

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“As compared with the corresponding period in 1890 the exports of 1892 fell off $47,477, and the import value increased $2,142,692. Much of the large increase in imports was due to the forced shipments of sugar to San Francisco in March. In the month of May the import value was unusually small, the arrivals of sugar having been comparatively light, owing to the local market being still overstocked.

“The import values were mostly for sugar, as shown by the following statement for the five months:

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“Deducting the value of sugar from the total imports in each year leaves for all other imports the following amounts: 1891, $232,488; 1890, $299,388; 1889, $268,475; 1888, $298,861.

“The tonnage employed in the trade between San Francisco and the Hawaiian Islands during the first five months of 1892 was as follows:

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“The combined movement (sail and steam) shows a total of 160 vessels for the first five months of the year, having an aggregate tonnage of 105,306 tons; as against 126 vessels, of 76,485 tons, for the same time in 1890.

“The value of the exports from the Hawaiian Islands for ten years past (1882–1892) amounted to $102475,652.04, while the imports show a valuation of $53,269,750.22, a total business of $155,745,402.76. In 1881, ten years back, the Hawaiian flag floated

over only 9,338 tons of shipping; the returns of Collector Cleghorn show that, December 31, 1891, the Hawaiian ensign covered over 13,429 tons, without an addition, in the near future, of nearly 4,000 tons more in newly built vessels, and which will be added during 1892. The number of steamers in 1881 was but nine; in 1891 the number is twenty-four, and of this latter twenty-two ply in Hawaiian waters. During the past year 224 American vessels, thirty-four British, eleven German, five Japanese and eleven from various countries, representing a total of 296,078 tons, have been entered at the various customs districts in the kingdom. This, aside from the twenty-five vessels representing 28,077 tons tonnage which sailed under Hawaiian colors and register.

“ The passenger traffic reported for the year shows that 4,984 people passed in transit, in vessels calling at this port, and that a total of 2,439 travelers and 7,339 immigrants, a grand total of 9,972 souls, arrived. Of this latter number 4,965 remain, added to the population.

“The report of Collector Cleghorn, Collector General of Customs of the Hawaiian Kingdom, shows that the United States received $5,294,287.57 of our trade, or 71.16 per cent. of our entire business abroad. This should show that we are not ungrateful for past kindnesses, and that we do a little purchasing in the course of a year. The total value of the imports for the year amounted to $7,439,482.65. Next to the United States comes, in the following order, the na

tions patronized during 1891, viz: Great Britain, Germany, China, Japan, Australia, British Columbia and France."

TEMPERATURE.

AVERAGE FOR EACH WEEK OF 1890 AT HONOLULU.

Elevation, 54 feet above sea level,
Latitude, 21° 18'; longitude, 1570 50.

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