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THE LION AND THE UNICORN. THE lion and the unicorn were fighting for the

crown, The lion beat the unicorn all round about the town; Some gave them white bread, and some gave them

brown, Some gave them plum cake, and sent them out of

town.

THE LION AND THE UNICORN.

ANOTHER VERSION.

THE lion and the unicorn

Fighting for the crown;
Off came the little dog,

And knocked them both down.

Some got white bread,

And some got brown,
But the lion beat the unicorn

Round about the town.

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BY PERMISSION OF MR. D. ROBERTSON, GLASGOW.

OUR wean 's the most wonderfu' wean e'er I saw;
It would tak’ me a long summer day to tell a'
His pranks, frae the morning till night shuts his e'e
When he sleeps like a peerie, 'tween father and me.
For in his quiet turns siccan questions he'll speir :
How the moon can stick up in the sky that's sae

clear ? What gars the wind blaw ? and whar frae comes

the rain ? He's a perfect divert—he's a wonderfu' wean!

Or who was the first bodie's father ? and wha
Made the very first snaw-shower that ever did fa’?
And who made the first bird that sang on a tree?
And the water that sooms a'the ships in the sea ?—
But after I've told him as well as I ken,
Again he begins wi' his who ? and his when ?
And he looks aye sae watchfu' the while I explain-
He's as auld as the hills—he's an auld-farrant wean.

And folk who ha'e skill o' the lumps on the head, Hint there's mair ways than toiling o' winning ane's

bread; How he'll be a rich man, and hae men to work for

him, Wi'a kyte like a baillie's shug shugging before him ; Wi' a face like the moon, sober, sonsy, and douce, And a back, for its breadth, like the side o' a house. 'Tweel I'm unco ta’en up wi't, they mak a' sae

plainHe's just a town's talk-he's a by-ord’nar wean! I ne'er can forget sic a laugh as I gat, To see him put on father's waistcoat and hat : Then the lang-leggit boots gaed sae far ower his

knees,

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