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THE

T A B L E of

CO N T E N T S.

PABOOK 11

Page 5

27 47 67

187

ARADISE REGAIN'D, BOOK I.

BOOK II.
BOOK III.
BOOK IV.
SAMSON AGONISTES.

99 POEMS on several OCCASIONS.

165 On the death of a fair Infant, dying of a Cough.

ibid. At a Vacation Exercise in the College.

168 On the MORNING of CHRIST'S NATIVITY.

172 The PASSION.

183 On TIME.

185 Upon the CIRCUMCISION.

186 At a SOLEMN MUSIC. An EPITAPH on the MARCHIONESS of WINCHESTER. 188 Song. On MAY MORNING.

191 On SHAKESPEAR.

192 On the University Carrier.

ibid. Another on the same.

193 L'ALLEGRO.

195 IL PENSEROSO. ARCADES.

207 A MASK.

217 LYCIDAS.

256 The Fifth ODE of Horace, Lib. 1. English’d.

263 On the new-forcers of conscience under the Long PARLAMENT.

265 SONNETS.

266 To the NIGHTINGALE.

ibid. On his being arriv'd to the age of 23.

270 When the assault was intended to the City.

ibid. To a virtuous young Lady.

271 To the Lady Margaret Ley.

ibid. On the detraction which followed upon my writing certain Treatises.

272 On the same.

273 To Mr. H. LAWES on his Airs.

ibid. On the religious memory of Mrs. Catharine Thompson. 274 To the Lord General FAIRFAX.

275 To

200

Page 275

ibid.

ibid.

326

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To the Lord General CROMWELL.
To Sir HENRY VANE the younger.

276
On the late Massacre in Piemont.
On his blindness.

277 To Mr. LAWRENCE.

278 To CYRIAC SKINNER. To the fame.

279 On his deceased WIFE.

ibid. PSALMS.

280 From Milton's Manuscript.

310 JOANNIS MILTONI LONDINENSIS POEMATA."

317 ELEGIARUM Liber primus.

323 Elegia Prima. Ad Carolum Deodatum.

ibid. Elegia Secunda. In obitum Paræconis Academici Cantabii

giensis. Elegia Tertia. In obitum Præsulis Wintoniensis.

327 Elegia Quarta. Ad Thomam Junium.

330 Elegia Quinta. In adventum veris.

334 Elegia Sexta. Ad Carolum Deodatum, ruri commorantem. 340 Elegia Septima.

343 In proditionem bombardicam.

347 In eandem.

ibid. In eandem.

348 In eandem.

ibid. In Inventorem Bombardæ.

349 Ad Leonoram Romæ canentem.

ibid. Ad eandem.

ibid. Ad eandem.

350 Apologus de Rustico et Hero.

ibid. SYLVARUM LIBER. In obitum Procancellarii Medici.

351 In quintum Novembris.

353
In obitum Præfulis Elienfis.
Naturam non pati fenium.
De Idea Platonica quemadmodum Aristoteles intellexit.
Ad Patrem.
Ad Salfillum poetam Romanum agrotantem.

372
Manfus.
Epitaphium Damonis.
Ad Joannem Rousium Oxoniensis Academia Bibliothecarium 386
Ad Christinam, Suecorum reginam.

390

361 363

366

367

374 378

R E G AI N’D.

BOOK I.

tempter foil'd

5

I

Who ere while the happy garden fung,

By one man's disobedience lost, now sing
Recover'd Paradise to all mankind,
By one man's firm obedience fully try'd
Through all temptation, and the
In all his wiles, defeated and repuls'd,
And Eden rais'd in the waste wilderness.

Thou Spi'rit who ledst this glorious eremite
Into the desert, his victorious field,
Against the spiritual foe, and brought' thimthence 10
By proof th' undoubted Son of God, inspire,
As thou art wont, my prompted song else mute,
And bear through highth ordepth of nature's bounds
With prosp’rous wing full summ’d, to tell of deeds
Above heroic, though in secret done,

15 And unrecorded left through many an age, Worthy t' have not remain'd so long unsung. Now had the great Proclamer, with a voice

More

More awful than the sound of trumpet, cry'd
Repentance, and Heav'n's kingdom nigh at hand 20
To all baptiz’d: to his great baptism flock'd
With awe the regions round, and with them came
From Nazareth the son of Joseph deem'd
To the flood Jordan, came as then obscure,
Unmark’d, unknown; but him the Baptist soon 25
Descry'd, divinely warn’d, and witness bore
As to his worthier, and would have resign'd,
To him his heav'nly office, nor was long
His witness unconfirm'd: on him baptiz'd
Heav'n open'd, and in likeness of a dove

30
The spi'rit descended, while the Father's voice
From Heav'n pronounc'd him his beloved Son.
That heard the Adversary, who roving still
About the world, at that assembly fam'd
Would not be laft, and with the voice divine 35
Nigh thunder-struck, th' exalted man, to whom
Such high attest was giv'n, a while survey'd
With wonder, then with envy fraught and rage
Flies to his place, nor rests, but in mid air
To council summons all his mighty peers,

40 Within thick clouds and dark ten-fold involv'd, A gloomy consistory; and them amidst With looks aghaft and sad he thus bespake.

O ancient Pow'rs of air and this wide world, For much more willingly I mention air,

45 This our old conquest, than remember Hell,

Our as the

Qur hated habitation; well ye know
How

many ages, as years of men,
This universe we have possess’d, and rul'd
In manner at our will th' affairs of earth,

50 Since Adam and his facil consort Eve Lost Paradise deceiv'd by me, though since With dread attending when that fatal wound Shall be inflicted by the seed of Eve Upon my head: long the decrees of Heav'n

55 Delay, for longest time to him is short; And now too soon for us the circling hours This dreaded time have compafs'd, wherein we Must bide the stroke of that long threaten'd wound, At least if so we can, and by the head

60 Broken be not intended all our power To be infring’d, our freedom and our being, In this fair empire won of earth and air; For this ill news' I bring, the woman's feed Destin'd to this, is late of woman born: His birth to our just fear gave no small cause, But growth now to youth's full flow'r, displaying All virtue, grace, and wisdom to achieve Things highest, greatest, multiplies my fear. Before him a great prophet, to proclame 70 His coming, his sent harbinger, who all Invites, and in the confecrated stream Pretends to wash off sin, and fit them so Purified to receive him pure, or rather

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