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Four acres of the rented land have been divided into 1-acre pints, upon which Is to be carried on a four-year crop-rotation demonstration. The idea in this is that not only shall the plats be large enough to be cultivated with two-horse implements, like the fields of a farm, but that there shall be measured equal tracts which may be used as a basis to compare the results at the school with the results obtained by the boys in the agricultural course who are members of the boys' corn club and with those of farmers in the community who are carrying on cooperative demonstrations. The other 4 acres of rented land will be devoted to pasture demonstrations. One-half of the field will be seeded for permanent pasture. The other half will be used to show how, by proper selection of cereals, clovers, and grasses, good pasture may be obtained for nearly all seasons of the year.

INSTRUCTIONAL WORK OF THE SCHOOL.

The fundamental purpose of the Farragut School is to give country boys and girls the best possible preparation for the duties and opportunities of rural life and citizenship. There are three four-year courses of study offered—a Latin course, an English and science course, and an agricultural course. This last course includes manual training, and the girls may substitute domestic economy for part of the agriculture. The courses are elective. Ninety per cent of the students are in the agricultural course. This course, as printed in the school catalogue, is given below. The other courses do not differ materially from this, except that the agriculture, domestic science, and manual training are omitted and the regular academic subjects given instead. The English and science course contains a course in general agriculture the second year. The Latin course includes four years of Latin and two of German.

Manual Training, Agriculture, And Home Economics Course.
(Periods per week.)
FIRST YEAR.

First term.

1 Mathematics—High school arith

metic 5

2 English—(a) Grammar 4

(b) Composition 1

3 Agriculture, manual training, or

home economics 5

4 Science—Botany 55

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 2

(b) Vocal music 2

(c) Writing 1

6 Spelling 5

Second term.

1 Mathematics—High school alge

bra 5

2 English—(a) Grammar 2

(b) Literature 2

(c) Composition 1

3 Agriculture, manual training, or

home economics 5

4 Science—Zoology 0

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 2

(b) Vocal music 2

(c) Writing 1

6 Spelling 5 SECOND YEAR.

1 Mathematics—High school alge

bra 5

2 English—(a) Rhetoric 2

(b) Literature 2

(c) Composition I

3 Agriculture, manual training, or

home economics 5

4 Science—Physiology 5

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 2

(b) Vocal music 2

(c) Writing 1

6 Spelling 5

1 Mathematics—Plane geometry-— 5

2 English—(a) Rhetoric 2

(b) Literature 2

(c) Composition 1

3 General history or German—5

4 Science—Physics 5

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 3

(b) Vocal music 2

0 Spelling 5

1 Mathematics—Solid geometry — 5

2 English—(a) Literature 4

(b) Composition 1

3 American history or German 5

4 Science—Chemistry 5

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 3

(b) Vocal music 2

6 Spelling 5

1 Mathematics—High school alge

bra 5

2 English—(a) Rhetoric 2

(b) Literature 2

(c) Composition 1

3 Agriculture, manual training, or

home economics 5

4 Science—Physical geography 5

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 2

(b) Vocal music 2

(c) Writing 1

6 Spelling 5

1 Mathematics—Plane geometry— 5

2 English—(a) Rhetoric 2

(b) Literature 2

(c) Composition 1

3 General history or German 5

4 Science—(a) Physics of agricul

ture 3

(b) State geology 2

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 3

(b) Vocal music 2

6 Spelling 5

1 Mathematics—Plane trigonome

etry and surveying 5

2 English—(a) Literature 4

(b) Composition 1

3 American history and civil gov

ernment or German 5

4 Science—Chemistry of agricul

ture 5

5 Exercises—(a) Drawing 3

(b) Vocal music 2

6 Spelling 5

THIRD YEAR.

FOURTH YEAR.

During the first year the boys have agriculture three times a week and manual training two double periods a week. The girls have the same work in agriculture, and home economics in place of the manual training. The first-year agricultural work is somewhat general in its character, and is made of interest to both boys and girls. The girls find ample opportunities to make use of their knowledge of agriculture, as practically all of them become farmers' wives. Many of them teach in country schools and find many opportunities to use their agriculture in their teaching work. One of the greatest values of these courses for girls, according to the principal of the school, will be the inspiration and stimulus for agricultural pursuits given to boys and girls of the next generation by educated mothers who understand the principles of agriculture and who have real sympathy for country life. An outline of the agricultural courses of the first and second years is as follows.

COUBSE IN AGRICULTURE.
FIRST YEAR.

Elementary principles of chemistry and physics. Demonstration of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water, and the common mineral elements

Soils: Origin, kinds and depths, types, chemical composition, soli moisture, drainage and ventilation, tillage, implements for soil preparation.

The Plant:

Classification—

Cereals: Corn, wheat, oats, and others.

Forage crops: Millets, clovers, alfalfa, cowpeas, soy beans, vetches, and

others. Root crops.

Fiber crops, both plant and animal: Cotton and wool. Rotation of crops. Fertilizers. Fropagation of plants. Plant improvement. Friends and enemies of plants:

Plant forms—fungi and weeds.

Animal forms—insects, birds, and animals.
Gardening and fruit growing.

Forestry, landscape gardening, and civic improvements.
Roads and road building.
Farm management:

Planning houses and barns.

Planning the arrangement of the fields of a farm for rotation of crops. Fuel and light.

Feeds and feeding; computing rations.
Animal husbandry:
Stock feeding.

General principles of breeding.
Domestic animals—types and values.

Horses and mules, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry, bees.
Country life conveniences.

SECOND YEAR.

Improvement of plants and animals.

Variation, heredity, and environment, selection.
Improvement of corn studied in detail: Selection of seed.

Corn tester and the ear row test
Propagation of plants studied more in detail than In first year.
Plant food, soil studies: Chemical and physical composition.

Soil water, soil air, organic matter, bacteria. Maintaining the fertility of the soil; manure, rotation of crops, lime, cover crops, tillage.

Study of the management of the corn, wheat, oats, cotton, and other crops.

Study of the farm wood lot and its management.
Study of orchards and fruit growing.

Enemies of farm crops and remedial measures: Spraying mixtures.
Weeds, fungus, and bacterial diseases.
Insects.

Systems of cropping. Feeds and feeding.
Study of the horse, cattle, sheep, swine, poultry.
Farm management. The farm home and community.

The work of the first year is, as stated above, of a general nature and endeavors to give the pupil a broad view of agriculture in all of its relations, and thus to arouse his interest in some particular line of agriculture and sympathy with country conditions. An attempt is made to win his respect for farm life by getting him to see in their true significance the agricultural problems which the farmer has to solve.

The work of the second year, while covering much of the ground gone over in the first year, is a more detailed study of the various subjects outlined. In this it is the purpose of the instruction to get at the underlying principles. It is intended to equip the pupil with what the farmer will need to know to make his farm life profitable and satisfying.

In the third year agricultural students take a half year in elementary physics, followed by a half year in agricultural physics. In this is included only the most practical phases of the subject, such as the movements of water in the soil and farm drainage, farm machinery, and farm structures, including buildings, bridges, and roads. In the fourth year general chemistry is studied the first half year, agricultural chemistry the second half. This also is made as practical as possible. Pupils study the chemistry of the air, of water, milk, animal and plant foods, soils, and fertilizers.

Textbooks in agriculture are used the first two years—Wilkinson's Practical agriculture in the first year, and Warren's Elements of agriculture in the second year. The textbook for the second year's work is supplemented by agricultural bulletins in the third and fourth years. In addition to the general texts in physics and chemistry, no special textbooks are used. In teaching agricultural physics and chemistry, several reference books are used, also much use is made of a collection in the school library of 4,000 bulletins from experiment stations and from the United States Department of Agriculture.

Mention is made of this collection of bulletins in another place in this article under the section on the community service of the school. The bulletins are used by other classes than those in agriculture. The authorities of the school believe that much agriculture can be taught through other subjects; also they believe that all the regular

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