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Jordan, David Starr, and Clark, G. A. Fur seals and fur-seal islands of north Pacific Ocean: Pt. 1, History, condition, and needs of herd of fur seals resorting to Pribilof Islands. 1898. 250 p. illus. large 8°. (Treasury dept. Seal islands of Alaska) Cloth, 75 cts.

Very interesting. Contains also a life-history and account of the habits of the animals. Many splendid half-tones and drawings from life.

Kendall, William Converse. American catfishes: habits, culture, and commercial importance. 1910. 39 p. illus. (Commerce dept. Fisheries bureau. Document 733) 10 cts. Brings together "the most important . . . facts on this subject." Knapp, Seaman A. Cotton, the greatest of cash crops. 1910. 10 p. (Agriculture dept. Office of secretary. Circular 32) 5 cts. Tells the necessity of fighting the cotton boll weevil. Land of the palm and pine. Official guide and hand book to the Philippines. 1911. 214 p. illus. (War dept. Insular affairs bureau) $1.

For sale only by the Insular affairs bureau, Washington, D. C. Interesting, authoritative, and richly illustrated.

Latin America.

The Pan-American union issues an authoritative, Interesting, and very well-illustrated monthly bulletin exclusively devoted to Latin America. Subscription price, 12 a year. It has also issued handbooks of nearly all these countries. None of the Union's publications are handled by the Superintendent of documents. For Information, write the Director of the Pan-American union, Washington, D. C.

Memorandum history of the Department of the interior. 20 p. 1912. (Interior dept.)

See also General information regarding the Department of the interior. 1912. 8 p. Munroe, Charles K., and Hall, Clarence. A primer on explosives for coal miners. 1909. 61 p. illus. (Interior dept. Geological survey. Bulletin 423) 15 cts. An interesting, simply-written book on explosives, their history, composition and uses. Official handbook of the Panama canal. 2d ed., rev. and enl. Ancon, Canal Zone, 1911. 30 p. diagrams and maps.

A running account of the canal, with full statistics. Valuable In either elementary or advanced ■work.

To be obtained free from the Panama canal commission, Washington, D. C. Papers on the conservation of mineral resources, reprinted from report of the National conservation commission, February 1909. 1909. 214 p. illus. maps. (Interior dept. Geological survey. Bulletin 394)

Contains: Coal fields of the United States, by M. R. Campbell and E. W. Parker; Estimates of future coal production, by Henry Gannett; The petroleum resources of the United States, by D. T. Day; Natural-gas resources of the Un'ted States, by D. T. Day; Peat resources of the United States, exclusive of Alaska, by C. A. Davis; Iron ores of the United States, by C. W. Hayes; Resources of the United States in gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc, by Waldemar Li ml. gren; The phosphate deposits of the United States, by F. B. Van Horn; Mineral resources of Alaska, by A. H. Brooks.

The writers tell of waste, past and present, and how to check it. The papers are exhaustive, authoritative, and readable.

Parsons, Charles L. Notes on mineral wastes. 1912. 44 p. (Interior dept.
Mines bureau. Bulletin 47) 5 cts.
A very interesting publication suitable for advance work in commercial geography.
Skinner, Robert P. Manufacture of seminola and macaroni. 1902. 31 p. illus.
4°. (Agriculture dept. Plant industry bureau. Bulletin 20) 15 cts.
An interesting semi-popular account.
[South America] Annual review number.

This annual review number of the Pan-American union bulletin gives under names of the different countries, arranged alphabetically, a careful resume', prepared from the latest information and data available, the commercial and economic conditions and progress of each one of the nations forming the Pan-American union.

Spencer, J. W. Elevations in Dominion of Canada. 1884. 43 p. (Interior dept.

Geological survey. Bulletin 6) 5 cts. Spillman, W. J. Soil conservation. 1910. 15 p. (Agriculture dept. Fanners'

bulletin 406)

"How to restore and maintain the productivity of the soil is the most Important phase of the conservation problem."

An interesting and thorough analysis of the land problem in this country as relates to agriculture, and comparisons with conditions in older countries. For secondary schools, city or country

Stevenson, Charles H. Whalebone: its production and utilization. 1907. 12 p. illus. (Commerce dept. Fisheries bureau. Document 626) 5 cts.

The sugar industry: Sugar cane and cane sugar in Louisiana, beet sugar data, and general tables. 1913. 126 p. (Commerce dept. Foreign and domestic commerce bureau. Misc. series, no. 9) 15 cts. Deals especially with the monetary side of the industry.

Suggestions to homesteaders and persons desiring to make homestead entries. 1913. 36 p. (Interior dept. General land office. Circular 224) Gives also all federal laws bearing on the subject.

Swingle, Walter T. The date palm and its utilization in the southwestern states. 1904. 155 p. illus. 4°. (Agriculture dept. Plant industry bureau. Bulletin 53) 20 cts.

Treats the crop from every possible standpoint; probably the best work on the date palm ever written. Very Interesting, and illustrated with about 3S splendid half-tones.

System of uniform and common international regulations for protection and preservation of food fishes in international boundary waters of United States and Canada. Ordered printed 1910. 19 p. (61st Cong., 2d sess. House document 638) 5 cts.

Transportation routes and systems of the world, development of steam-carrying power on land and sea 1800-1908, and table of distances from New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, and Port Townsend to principal ports of the world and principal cities of United States. 1909. 26 p. 4°. (Commerce dept. Foreign and domestic commerce bureau) 10 cts.

Vacant public landB in the United States. 1913. 24 p. (Interior dept. General land office. Circular 259)

Tables "show, by states, territories, land districts and counties, the area of unappropriated and unreserved public lands, surveyed and unsurveyed and a brief description of the character of the vacant lands."

Winslow, Erving. Conditions and future of Philippines. 1909. 8 p. (61st Cong., 1st sess. Senate document 81) 5 cts. From North American review. Criticises colonial administration.

Work of survey. 2d ed. 1909. 47 p. illus. map. (Commerce dept. Coast and geodetic survey) 10 cts.

The work of the Bureau of soils. Rev. 1905. 15 p. (Agriculture dept. Bureau of soils. Circular 13) 5 cts.

Tfiis series of circulars includes 40 reports on the soils of the Eastern United States. Gives distribution; characteristics; surface features and drainage; limitations in use; improvements In soil efficiency; limitations on special crops; crop adaptation; farm equipment necessary to work it, etc. The series also contains a number of circulars dealing with special phases of soil questions, such as fertilizers, etc. In addition, the bureau has made hundreds of county soli surveys and soil surveys of local areas, which it Issues accompanied by maps. These surveys are written In understandable language. Write the bureau for its publications dealing with the soils of your locality. These works are useful alike in teaching geography, geology, nature study, or agriculture.

MAPS.

Alabama. Scale 12 m. = l in. 1895. 32.3X21 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Alaska. Scale60m.=lin. 1909 . 31X41.9in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Alaska. [Index map showing areas covered by topographic maps, with inset, Aleutian
Islands] Scale 1:5,000,000. 1909. 16.8 X 23.8 and 2.5X9 in. (Interior dept.
Geological survey) 10 cts.
Note.—On the back is a bibliography of Geological survey publications on Alaska.

Arizona [with plans of cities and railroads] Scale 12 m.=l in. 1912. 37.5 X30.7 in.
(Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Insets: Phoenix. 2X2.1 in. Railroads in Arizona, Connections to. Scale 60 m.—0.3 in. 4X3.3 in. Tucson. 3X2 in.

Arkansas. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1901. 22.8 X28 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Coal fields of United States [map with text] Scale 300 m. =2.7 in. 1908. 25.9 X36.6 in. (Interior dept. Geological survey) [Size of map is 17.6X28.3 in.] 10 cts.

Colorado. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1910. 28.7 X33.8 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Cuba. Geographical and topographical map of Cuba. 2 sheets. Scale 2 m.=l in. 1873. Each sheet 24.1X33.6 in. (War dept. Engineer office. Maps nos. 10, 11) Each, 13 cts.

Egypt. Map of lower Egypt and of adjacent country, with part of Palestine. Scale 15Jm. = lin. 1882. 24 X28.9 in. (War dept. Engineer office. Map no. 14) 20 cts.

Explorations. United States, showing routes of principal explorers, and early roads and highways [map, with insets] Scale 120 m.=1.35 in. 1908. 23.4 X 32 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Alaska, with inset, Aleutian Islands. Hawaiian Islands, with inset, Ouam or Cuajan Islands.
Panama Canal, with inset, Isthmus of Panama, showing location of canal. Philippine Islands.
Porto Rico. Tutuila Group of Samoan Islands: Manua Islands; Rose Islands; Tutuila Island.

Note.—A partial list of the routes included follows: Ponce de Leon, 1512. Coronado, 1540.
Drake, 1579. Smith, 1607. Hudson, 1608. Champlain, 1609. Mayflower, 1620. Jollet, 1673.
La Salle, 1680. Boone, 1765. Wilderness Road, 1769. Cook, 1778. Lewis and Clark, 1804. Pike,
1806. Bonneville, 1831. Fremont, 1843. Santa Fe Trail. National Highway. Spanish Trail.

Florida. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1911. 40.4X31.8 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts. See also Post routes.

Hawaii. Map of territory. Scale 12 m.=l in.; with inset, Hawaiian Archipelago, scale 152 m. = 1 in. 1901. 22 X33.5 and 7.7X12.7 in. (Interiordept. General land office) 25 cts.

Illinois. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1911. 32.8X19.3 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Indiana. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1886. 23.9X16.6 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Iowa. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1885. 32.3 X 20 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Kansas. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1898. 24.1X36.1 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Louisiana. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1896. 30 X 28.5 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Michigan. Scale 16 m.=l in. 1904 . 30.3 X 25.5 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Minnesota. Scale 12 m.=l in.; with inset Minneapolis and vicinity and St. Paul and vicinity. 1905. 37.1X31.6 and 8.3X10.8 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Mississippi. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1890. 20.8 X32.7 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Missouri. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1911. 28.5X32.8 in. (Interior dept. General land

office) 25 cte.

Montana. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1911. 33.5 X49.3 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 eta.

Insets: Butte, 6.1X4.6 In. Great Falls, 4.1X4.4 In. Helena, 6.7X9.3 In. Missoula, 3.4X4.1 In. Natural forest regions of North America and their characteristic tree growth. Scale 5° long.=1.6 in. 1910. 18.1X13.7 in. (Agriculture dept. Forest service) 15 cts.

Natural forest regions of South America and their characteristic tree growth. Scale 10° long.=1.2 in. 1911. 18X14-2 in. (Agriculture dept. Forest service) 15 cts.

Nebraska. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1909. 26.7X39.3 and 6.8X6.1 in. (Interior dept.

General land office) 25 cts. Nevada. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1908. 42.9 X30.4 in. (Interior dept. General land

office) 25 cts.

New Mexico. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1908. 37.3 X 31.2 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

North Dakota. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1910. 25.9 X 33.2 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Ohio. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1910. 21.5X23.9 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Oklahoma [with plane of cities] Scale 12 m.=l in. 1907. 21.5x42.7 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts. Guthrie, 6.1X6.1 in. Lawton, 3.1X5.8 in. McAlester, 7X4.8 in. Muskogee, 5.1X5.6 in.

Oregon. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1910. 28.5 X 36.5 and 4.8X3.4 in. (Interior dept.

General land office) 25 cts. Note.—Reclamation projects are noted on this map which did not appear on previous edition. Philippine Islands. Atlas. 1900. 24 p. 30 maps, large 4? (Commerce dept.

Coast and geodetic survey. Special publication 3) Cloth, $3.15. South Dakota. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1910. 26X37.5 in. (Interior dept. General

land office) 25 cts.

Utah. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1908. 33.6 X 26.1 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cts.

Washington. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1909. 23 X 34.6 in. (Interior dept. General land

office) 25 cte. [I 21.13: W 27]

Insets: Seattle. Tacoma. Wisconsin. Scale 12 m.=l in. 1912. 29.5 X 26.1 in. (Interior dept. General land

office) 25 cte.

Wyoming [with plans of cities] Scale 12 m.=l in. 1912. 28.8 X 33.8 in. (Interior dept. General land office) 25 cte.

Insets: Cheyenne and vicinity, 3.1X3.5 in. Evanston, 3.1X2 in. Laramie, 3.1X2 in. Sheridan and vicinity, 3.1X3.9 in.

UNITED STATES.

General.

United States, showing extent of public surveys, Indian, military, and forest reservations, railroads, canals, national parks, and other details [with insets]; corrected to June 30, 1911. Scale 37 m.=l in. 59.4X82.3 in. (Interior dept. General land office) Paper, $1.00. I 21.13:Un 3"

Insets: Alaska, with inset, Aleutian Islands. Canal Zone; with insets, Isthmus of Panama, showing location of canal. Hawaiian Islands, with inset, Guam or Cuajan Island. Philippine Islands. Porto Rico. TutuOa Group of Samoan Islands: Manua Islands; Rose Island; Tututta Island.

Note.—This map is about 5 by 7 feet, mounted on muslin and attached to rollers.

At times the Secretary has a limited number of wall maps of the United States for distribution to schools and public libraries (one to each institution), but not to individuals. Teachers requesting this map should always give name of school. This map measures 84 by 61 inches and is on the scale of 37 miles to the inch. It has smaller scale insets showing Alaska, the Canal Zone, and insular possessions. It shows the territorial growth of the United States, the principal towns and railroads, Indian and other reservations, national parks, national forests, and reclamation projects. It does not show county boundaries. This map may bo purchased from the Superintendent of documents. Government printing office, for II.

Topographic atlas.

When, in 1882, the Geological survey was directed by law to make a geologic map of the United States, there was not in existence a suitable topographic map to serve as a base. The preparation of such a map was immediately begun. About one-third of the area of the country, excluding Alaska, has now been mapped. The map is published in altas sheets, each sheet representing a small quadrangular district. About 1,800 sheets have been engraved and printed. They are sold only by the United States geological survey, at 10 cents each or at 6 cents in lots of 50 or more. Descriptive circulars may be had on application.

See also Salisbury, R. D., and Atwood, W. W. Interpretation of topographic maps; 1908. 84 p. illus. 1S1 maps. 4°. (Interior dept. Geological survey. Professional paper 60) J2.75.

Geologic.

Geologic atlas of the United States.

Under the plan adopted for the preparation of a geologic map of the United States the entire area is divided into small quadrangles, bounded by certain meridians and parallels, and these quadrangles, which number several thousand, are separately surveyed and mapped. The unit of survey is also the unit of publication, and the maps and description of each quadrangle are issued in the .form of a folio. When all the folios are completed they will constitute a geologic atlas of the United States.

A folio is designated by the name of a principal town or of a prominent natural feature within the quadrangle. It comprises topographic, geologic, economic, and structural maps of the quadrangle, and occasionally other illustrations, together with a general description. Each folio is about 20.6X17.6 Inches in size. They are sold direct by the Geological survey, to whom orders for the local atlas should be addressed.

Parcel post, etc.

Parcel post map.

This map, or rather series of maps of the United States, explanatory of the parcel-post service is distributed to all the post offices of the country. It shows the whole country divided into 3,500 small oblong sections. All post offices located within one of these sections will require the same rate of postage on parcels. As there are 3,500 sections, there are 3,500 variations of the map. While the base map is the same in all cases, each one of the 3,500 sections becomes in its turn the center of a series of 8 numbered zones Indicated by bright red lines printed across the black-andwhite face of the base map.

This map is told by the Post office department, together with the explanatory guide, for 75 cents.

Post route maps. These maps, which show the post routes and the location of the principal post-offices, do not show much detail in addition. The larger states are on two or four sheets, while two or three of the smaller stales are grouped on a single sheet. They are sold only by the Disbursing clerk, Post-office department, at the uniform price of 80 cents a sheet.

The following is a list of maps available:

Alabama.

Alaska.

Arizona.

Arkansas.

California, Nevada, 4 sheets.
Canal Zone, Isthmus of Panama.
Colorado.

Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia.
Florida.
Georgia.

Hawaii, Samoan Islands, Guam.
Illinois.
Indiana.
Iowa.

Kansas, Nebraska, 2 sheets.

Kentucky, Tennessee, 2 sheets.

Louisiana.

Maine.

Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut.

Michigan, Wisconsin, 2 sheets.

Minnesota.

Mississippi.

Missouri.

Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, 2 sheets.

New Hampshire, Vermont.

New Jersey.

New Mexico.

New York, 4 sheets.

North Carolina, South Carolina, 2 sheets.
North Dakota.

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