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he shall forfeit to the proprietor all the plates on which the same shall be copied, and every sheet thereof, either copied or printed, and shall further forfeit one dollar for every sheet of the same found in his possession, either printing, printed, copied, published, imported, or exposed for sale; and in case of a painting, statue, or statuary, he shall forfeit ten dollars for every copy of the same in his possession, or by bim sold or exposed for sale; one-half thereof to the proprietor and the other half to the use of the United States.

19. Any person publicly performing or representing any dramatic composition for which a copyright has been obtained, without the consent of the proprietor thereof, or his heirs or assigns, shall be liable for damages therefor; such da'nages in all Cases to be assessed at such sum, not less than one hundred dollars for the first, and fifty dollars for every subsequent performance, as to the court shall appear to be just.

20. Every person who shall print or publish any manuscript whatever, without the consent of the author or proprietor first ob ned, (if such author or proprietor is a citizen of the United States, or resident therein,) shall be liable to the author or proprietor for all damages occasioned by such injury.

21. No action shall be maintained in any case of forfeiture or penalty under the copyright laws, unless the same is commenced within two years after the cause of action has arisen.

22. In all actions arising under the laws respecting copyrights the defendant may plead the general issue, and give the special matter in evidence.

23. The circuit courts, and district courts having the jurisdiction of circuit courts, shall have power, upon bill in equity, filed by any party aggrieved, to grant injunctions to prevent the violation of any right secured by the laws respecting copyrights, according to the course and principles of courts of equity, on such terms as the court may deem reasonable.

24. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to prohibit the printing, publishing, importation, or sale of any book, map, chart, dramatic or musical composition, print, cut, engraving, or photograph, written, composed, or made by any person not a citizin of the United States nor resident therein.

25. [\pproved June 18, 1874, to take effect August 1, 1974.] That in the construction of this act, the words “engraving," "cut,” and “print,” shall be applied only to pictorial illustrations or work connected with the fine arts, and no prints or labels designed to be used for any other articles of manufacture shall be entered under the copyright law, but may be registered in the Patent-Office. And the Commissioner of Patents is hereby charged with the supervision and control of the entry or registry of such prints or labels, in conformity with the regulations pro vided by law as to copyright or prints, except that there shall be paid for recording the title of any print or label, not a trade. mark, six dollars, which shall cover the expense of furnishing a copy of the record, under the seal of the Commissioner of Patents, to the party entering the same.

QUALIFICATION OF VOTERS.

The Constitution of the United States declares that the right of citizens of the United States shall not be denied or abridged by the United States, or by any State, on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

A citizen of the United States must be a citizen of the State or Territory in wbich be resides. It is there he must exercise the right of voting, if he possesses that right. All the States require residence for a certain time within the State, or County, or Township, or District in which he offers his vote. Soldiers and those engaged in the Marine service of the United States, do not require a residence by being stationed in the State. Persons of insane mind, paupers, and those convicted of infamous crimes, are not entiilid to vote. It is sometimes stated in State Constitutions that a pardon of felony removes the disability of the voter, which is generally the case.

ALABAMA.-Every male citizen of the United States, and hav. ing resided in the State one year next preceding the election, and the last three months thereof in the county in which he offers his vote. Persons convicted of treason, embezzlement of public fund's, malfeasance in office, bribery, or crime punishable by imprisonment, lose the right of suffrage.

ARKANSAS.—Every citizen who was born in the l'nited States, or has been naturalized, or has legally declared his intention of becoming a citizen of the United States, has the right to vote. He must also have resided in the State six months next preceding the election, and be at the time of voting a resident of the county in which he votes. Excep:ions are made in the case of criminals, embezzlement of public funds, ma feasance in office, or bribery, and also of those who during ihe Rebellion took the oath of allegiance to the United -tates, and afterwards aided in any way the cause of the Rebellion.

CALIFORNIA.-Every citizen of the United States, and every Mexican electing, under the treaty of 1848, to be a citizen of the United States, who has been a resident of the State six months, and in the county or district in which he offers his vote, thirty days next preceding the election. Persons convicted of any infamous crime are excepted.

CONNECTICUT.-Every ci'izen of the United States who has resided in the State. town, or city in which he offers to vote, six months, is of good moral character, and is able to read a clause in the constitution or statutes of the State. Persons convicted of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, or other offence for which infamous punishment is inflicted, are excepted.

DELAWARE.-Every person who is a citizen of the United States, who has resided one year in the State, and the last month of that year in the county in which he offers bis vote. If he be over twenty-one, and under twenty-two, he may vote without having paid any tax; but if he be over tiventy-two, he must have paid a county tax within two years before the election, which was assessed, and six months at least before the election at which he offers his vot. Felons are excepterl, and the Legislature may make forfeiture of the right of suffrage a punishment for crime.

FLORIDA.—Every male citizen of the United States, or who shall bave declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, according to law, has the right to vote. He must bave resided in the State one year, and in the county in which he proposes to vote six months next preceding the election at which he offers his vote. No person under guardianship, and no person convicted of felony shall be allowed to vote.

GEORGIA.—Every male citizen of the United States, or who has declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, according to law, has the right to vote. He must have resided in the State six months next before the election, anil in the county in which he offers his vote thirty days, and paid all taxes required of him for the year next before the election. Also if he was a re-ident of the State at the time of the adop'ion of the Constitution. Any person who has been convicted of infamous crimes, and persons who engage in a duel, or send or accept a challenge, or aid in a duel, are disqualified.

ILLINOIS.—Every citizen of the United States who has resided in the State one year before offering his vole, and in his election district ihirty days, can exercise tbe elective franchise.

INDIANA.-. Every citizen of the United States who is native born, and has resided in the State six months preceding the election, or if of foreign birth of the age of twenty-one years, who ahall bave resided in the United States one year, and in the State six montns preceding such election, and shall have deciared his intention to become a citizen, shall be entitled to vote.

Iowa.-Every citizen of the United States, a resident of the State six months, and in the county sixty days next preceiling the election is entitled to vote. Persons convicted of infamous crimes, insane persons, and paupers excepted. · MAINE.-Every citizen of the United States who has resided in the State three months next preceding the election. Persons under guardianship and paupers excepted.

MARYLAND.--Every citizen of the United States who has resided in the State one year, and six months in the county next preceding the election, is entitled to vote.

Persons under guardianship, and those convicted of infamous crimes excepted.

MASSACHUSETTS.—Every citizen of the United States who has resided in the State one year, and six months in the city or town next preceding an election, and can read the constitution in the English language, and write lis name. Naturalized citi. zens can' ot vote or hold office unless they have resided within the jurisdiction of the United States two years subsequent to their naturalization. Persons under guardianship and paupers are not entitled to vote.

KANSAS.-Every male person who is a citizen of the United States, or, if foreign born, has legally declared his intention to become a citizen, have resided in the State six months, and in the township or ward in which he offers his vote thirty days. Those under guardianship, and persons convicted of treason or felony, or persons who shall give or accept a challenge to fight a duel, or who shall knowingly carry to another person such challenge, or shall go out of the State to fight a duel, or those who have borne arms against the United States, or aided in the attempted overthrow tliereof, are excepted.

KENTUCKY.—Every male citizen of the United States who has resided in the State two years, one year in the county, and sixty days in the precinct in which he offers his vote,

LOUISIANA.—Every male citizen of the United States who has resided one year in the State, and the last ten days of that year within the parisb,except those disfranchised by the constitution, and persons convicted of treason, forgery, bribery, perjury, or other crime punishable by imprisonment; also, those persons who held office or took part in the organization styled “The Confederate States of America." until he acknowledged the “Rebellion to have been both morally and politically wrong, and thàt he regrets all aid be may have given it.”

MICHIGAN —Every male citizen of the United States, or who has declared his intention to become a citizen six months next preceding the election, and has resided in the State three months, and in the township or ward in which he intends to vote, ten days next preceding the election. Any person who may be engaged in a duel, either as principal or accessory, loses the right of suffrage.

MINNESOTA.- Every male citizen of the United States, or being of foreign lirth, has declared bis intention to become a citizen, and persons of Indian blood, in whole or in part, who have become civilized, and are declared capable of exercising the elective franchise by some District Court in the State ; bave resided in the United States one year, in the State four months, and in the district ten days before the election. No person under guardianship, or person convicted of treason or felony, shall be allowed to vote.

MISSISSIPPI.--Every citizen of the United States wbo shall have resided in the State six months, and one month in the county next preceding the elect'on, shall be entitled to vote. Persons disqualified by crime and Indians not taxed are excepted.

MISSOURI.—Every male citizen of the United States, or who has legally declared his intention of becoming a citizen in one year before he offers to vote, and has resided in the State one year, in the county, city, or town sixty days. After the year 1876, new voters must be able to read and write, unless prevented by physical debility.

NEBRABKA.—Every person who is a citizen of the United States, and persons of foreign birth, who shall have declared their intention to become citizens, if they have resided in the State one year, in the county or ward for sixty days preceding the election.

NEVADA.—Every citizen of the United States, and who shall have resided in the State six months, and in the district or county thirty days next preceding the election. Persons convicted of treason or felony in any State or Territory of the United States, or who has borne arms against the United States after he was eighteen years of age, or held any office under the so-called Confederate States, shall not be permitted to vote.

New HAMPSHIRE.--Every citizen of the United States (excepting paupers and persons excused from paying taxes at their own request), resident in the State and town six months next preceding an election, is entitled to vote.

NEW JERSEY.—Every citizen of the United Stat's who has resided in the State one year, and in the county five months next before the election, and an actual resident of the town or ward, and has not been convicted of a crime which would incapacitate him from giving testimony in any Court in the State.

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