The New Psychology: Its Message, Principles and Practice

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Cosimo, Inc., 2007 M04 1 - 236 páginas
How can we be stronger, more powerful, more capable, more efficient, all-around just plain better people? Followers of the New Thought movement-an early "New Age" philosophy that was tremendously popular around the turn of the 20th century-turned to "New Psychology," a melding of the scientific and the spiritual into a fresh metaphysical paradigm. In this 1909 book, one of the most influential voices in New Thought explains how we can cultivate in ourselves innovative modes of thinking and positive emotional states, using our will, our imagination, and the power of self-suggestion to change our lives for the better. Brisk and confident, this classic of New Thought literature is as useful today as it was a century ago.American writer WILLIAM WALKER ATKINSON (1862-1932) was editor of the popular magazine New Thought from 1901 to 1905, and editor of the journal Advanced Thought from 1916 to 1919. He authored dozens of New Thought books under numerous pseudonyms, some of which are likely still unknown today, including "Yogi Ramacharaka" and "Theron Q. Dumont."

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Página 115 - If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings of its bodily symptoms, we find we have nothing left behind, no 'mind-stuff...
Página 127 - ... to a climax by repeated outbreaks of expression. Refuse to express a passion, and it dies. Count ten before venting your anger, and its occasion seems ridiculous. Whistling to keep up courage is no mere figure of speech. On the other hand, sit all day in a moping posture, sigh, and reply to everything with a dismal voice, and your melancholy lingers.
Página 136 - Reason, imagination becomes the mightiest instrument of the physical discoverer. Newton's passage from a falling apple to a falling moon was, at the outset, a leap of the imagination.
Página 102 - ... new; there has been a change in the tissue, and this change is a new habit of cohesion. A lock works better after being used some time; at the outset more force was required to overcome certain roughness in the mechanism.
Página 127 - Refuse to express a passion and it dies. Count ten before venting your anger, and its occasion seems ridiculous. Whistling to keep up courage is no mere figure of speech. On the other hand, sit all day in a moping posture, sigh, and reply to everything with a dismal voice and your melancholy lingers. There is no more valuable precept in moral education than this, as all who have...
Página 44 - Memtal events imperceptible to consciousness are far more numerous than the others, and of the world which makes up our being we only perceive the highest points — the lighted-up peaks of a continent whose lower levels remain in the shade. Beneath ordinary sensations are their components, that is to say, the elementary sensations, which must be combined into groups to reach our consiousness.
Página 105 - For the good that I would I do not : but the evil that I would not, that I do.
Página 87 - ... how it is that anything so remarkable as a state of consciousness comes about as the result of irritating nervous tissue, is just as unaccountable as the appearance of the Djin when Aladdin rubbed his lamp in the story.
Página 102 - If an act became no easier after being done several times, if the careful direction of consciousness were necessary to its accomplishment on each occasion, it is evident that the whole activity of a lifetime might be confined to one or two deeds— that no progress could take place in development.

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