Tracts for the New Times, Volúmenes1-2

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J. Allen, 1847
 

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Página 26 - The times have been That, when the brains were out, the man would die, And there an end ; but now they rise again, With twenty mortal murders on their crowns, And push us from our stools.
Página 5 - His doctrine is. that he who eats or eats not, regards a day or regards it not, may do either to the Lord. How many other things might be tolerated in peace and left to conscience, had we but charity, and were it not the chief stronghold of our hypocrisy to be ever judging one another? I fear yet this iron yoke of outward conformity hath left a slavish print upon our necks; the ghost of a linen decency yet haunts us.
Página 20 - The nature of the member or organ is known from the use. The use determines what the organ is in itself, or in its own form ; what it is, in series, with other organs which are contiguous to it or surround it, and which continuously precede and continuously follow it ; and what it is, in order, with those which are above and below, or prior and posterior to it. All these, and their uses, indicate the nature of the organ under investigation. The use and end are the first things that manifest themselves...
Página 18 - When I take up a stone or clod of earth and look upon it, then I see that which is above and that which is below, yea, [I see] the whole world therein...
Página 20 - The use or effect which produces the end must be the first object of analytical enquiry. The nature of a member or organ is known from the use. The use determines what the organ is in itself, or in its own form ; what it is in series with other organs which are contiguous to it, or surround it, and which continuously precede and continuously follow it ; and what it is in order with the organs which are above and below, or prior and posterior to it.
Página 3 - In ascending to the great principles upon which all society rests," said Justice Joseph Story, in 1828, "it must be admitted that there are some which are of eternal obligation, and arise from our common dependence upon our Creator. Among these are the duty to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before God.
Página 15 - Dare you lay your hands on your hearts, and say that you alone of all the earth lead a good life? Thus that you alone of all the earth believe in the Lord 1 And if not, what a mere immodesty it is in you to flaunt the distinctive name of new church in our eyes, and stigmatize your rival corporations by that of old church ! Your intellectual assent to these propositions of Swedenborg, does not constitute you a good man, nor a believer in the Lord. Why...
Página 18 - ... or tribe, but with all the families or tribes of one town ; which is the ancient civilization, or the era of Athens and Rome. And finally you see it still further modified by subjection to the national bond, which brings the individual into unity not only with all his fellow townsmen, but with all his fellow countrymen. This is our present civilization. Thus you see the individual unit expanding successively into the family and tribal unity, into the municipal unity, and finally into the national...
Página 18 - ... not his own nation merely, but all the nations of the earth, when in a word his sympathies shall flow forth towards every brother of the race, purely according to the good that is in him. Let no good man doubt this consummation ; the divine existence is thereby doubted. All history yearns for it. The whole course of Providence ensures it. Who that traces the beautiful Providential order by which the individual rises into the brother, the neighbor, and the citizen, can doubt that the crowning.
Página 1 - WITH MAN, ILLUSTRATED BY THE PRINCIPAL ORGANS. BY JAMES JOHN GARTH WILKINSON, Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

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