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EXTRACT FROM A LETTER OF HON. WILLIAM

CRANCH OF WASHINGTON, D. C.

The following is an extract from a letter of Judge Cranch to the Editor.

Among some old papers of my father, I found a letter from the Rev. William Clark, dated Quincy, Aug. 10, 1803, in which he says, 'Mr. William Winthrop of Cambridge has, for some time past, been engaged in a pursuit rather extraordinary, viz., to investigate the following particulars of every one who has received a degree at Harvard College, from the first foundation of that University in 1648 to the present time;, viz., the origination or where born, his professional business or employment, his place of residence, time of his death and age ; also any thing remarkable in their lives and characters; where such matters can be ascertained. Again, Mr. Clark says, 'In his (Mr. Winthrops) next letter he opened his design tó me; and with respect to the clergy in particular, when the Catalogue was printed in 1797, the whole number of gradwates then being 3533, of which number those who had been, or then were, settled ministers of the Gospel amounted to 1121; of this number, he informed me he had ascertained the places of settlement, and other particulars of 1117, 60 that there were but 4 remaining unascertained, viz., John Alors, 1692 — Joseph Gerrish, 1700—Noyes Paris, 1721 — of these 2 last, however, he gives some proof, that he was not wholly destitute of some intelligence about them. But what is most surprising was, that of the 4 above mentioned unascertained persons, myself brought up the rear! He had never heard where I officiated before the revolution, though it was no further from him than Dedhum, where I lived ten years !- I wrote him fully of myself, and various others, whom he has since desired information of; only there were 2 of the last mentioned, that I knew very little about, whose names I mentioned to you : viz., whether Cornelius Nye, who graduated in 1718, was not the same person who was a schoolmaster in Braintree, and who was somewhat distinguished for his witty talents ? If so, did he ever pursue any other employment than keeping school ? Shepard Fisk, who graduated in 1721, and lived at Braintree, his employment, decease and age? If you could without inconvenience to yourself, collect any thing certain of these 2 persons, or either of them, and put it in writing and send it to me, it would be thankfully received., I expect to have occasion to write to Mr. Winthrop shortly, and should be happy to transmit any thing so agreeable to him, as any discovery this kind, whose mind seems to be intensely fixed on this pursuit.?

"Mr. Clark afterwards sent to my father the following extracts from Mr. Winthrop's letter to him, dated Oct. 10, 1803.

“I feel myself greatly obliged to you, as well as to Judge Cranch, (Judge Richard Cranch,) for the information contained in your last letter with its inclosures. I have long since heard of that gentleman's researches into the antiquities of this country, and conclude he must be possessed of a large fund of information upon that subject. Is there no way that I can avail myself of it to promote my plan?

"Finding by your letter that you suppose that Mr. Sheppard, who was settled at Cambridge, and who was an eminent minister in that day, was the same that graduated in 1653, I inclose you some memorandums respecting that family, which may, perhaps, be gratifying to the Judge as well as to yourself.'

“The postscript is in these words :—- I will thank you to present my respects to Judge Cranch, when you have a convenient opportunity, and inform him that I feel myself under great obligations to him for his information respecting Messrs. Nye and Fiske; and that any further communications he will please to make to me, I shall most gratefully acknowledge.?"

66

Letter from Rev. John Walrond to Rev. Wm. Waldron. (Jan.

LETTER FROM REV. JOHN WALROND OF OTTERY, ENG., TO REV.
WILLIAM WALDRON, MINISTER OF BOSTON, AND BROTHER
OF SECRETARY WALDRON.

Ortery, March 8, 1725–6. “Rev. AND DEAR SIR,

It was a very pleasant surprise to me to receive a Letter from you, who no doubt are of the same Name and Family with myself, tho' a letter in it be transposed, and who by Dr. Mather's Character of you, are not the least in your Father's House.

I have made some Enquiry about the Somersetshire Branch of our Family, from whence you are descended, but cannot exactly determine, tho' I am apt to think it must be from one of those two Gentlemen, of which, one was Walrond, of Illbrewers who had about five hundred Pounds pr. Annum or more, and the other Walrond of Saye, of about the same Value, and I think both of them Justices of the Peace, in that County, one of them I am sure was so, viz., the former; both of them degenerated into looseness of Living in Charles 2ds Reign, and both ruined their Estates and dyed poor, above twenty years since. Walrond of Illbrewers was a great persecutor of the Dissenters, but in the conclusion wanted bread.

There is an honest family of about a hundred Pounds pr. annum, still living at Wellington, in Somerset, very excellent Men, great supports of Religion, and one of the Brothers ab' your Age, a very good young Minister, living now in Dorsetshire.

The Head of all our Family still remains in a good Estate, about a thousand Pounds pr. Annum, from whom I am the second Generation. The seat is called Bradfield in Devon.

It was granted by the Crown, about six hundred years since, to one Richard Walerand, and has continued in the Family to this Day; The last Gentleman that dyed was a very pious good Man, about eighty years of Age and an excellent Magistrate in his Country, that could at any time lead three hundred Freeholders, to the Election of a Shire Knight; but his son is degenerate and very wicked: 1 conversed much with the old Gentleman, but this is no Friend to my Profession.

Another Branch sprung from Bradfield House in this county (beside those two families in Somerset before mentioned) which is seated at Bovey, in the East of Devon, which Branch sprang from its Root about 340 years since, and now inherits at least, a thousand Pounds per Annum; This also has degenerated and become like other Gentlemen in England: For Religion indeed, is almost quite gone, out of the Familys of the Gentry, by Means of a loose and licentious Clergy.

I never could find any of our Name, in all England, but in the Western Counties, and from thence, a Family went, as Merchants to Barbadoes, grew rich, and was in the Government there; and the last Gentleman a Batchelor seated himself at Greenwich near London, was morally honest and very charitable, but having a great loss in the South Sea, of almost all his Money could not bear it, but shot himself in the Head.

Our Coat of Arms, is three Bulls Heads, as you'l see by my seal on this Letter, But Stemata quid faciunt ?

I find our Name in Skinner's Etymologicon Linguae Anglicanae ; toward the end of which Book, in his Onomastichon, he has the word Walarand, olim Praenomen nunc Cognomen ab Anglo Sax Walpian, volvere, et RAND, Scutum, volvere scutum, i. e., qui Clypeum huc illuc circumagit

. Waldron autem cognomen contractum est a Walarand. "I have transcribed what he says lest the Book should not be common with you. I wish you had let me know into what Family your Grandfather married, for that might perhaps have given Light into the Enquiry; however I will examine farther, and take the first opportunity to inform you, as I can get Intelligence; but I know of no male Posterity left of the two Somersetshire Familys that I mentioned above.

I am much pleased with your Correspondence, and shall at any time be obliged by Letters from you, * * * send, by a worthy good Man, Capt. * * * who carries this (as I hope he will) from the *** Exeter to Boston. As to any Ecclesiastical Informations I must refer you to Dr. Mather's Letter which encloses this. May the Lord of the Harvest prosper you and make you a burning and a shining Light. 'You and I are of one Family, Faith and Profession. Let us particularly pray for each other, tho' we should never see each others face on Earth. Oh that the God of all Grace, may excite us both, to work the Works, of him that sent us while it is Day, that we may have a comfortable Requiem, from our Labors at last, and be accepted, when our Lord shall come, with which I conclude.

Dear Sir, Your affect: Kinsman and Serv't, “To the Rev. Mr. William Waldron,

John WALROND."
Minister in Boston."
Note.' Where blanks occur in the last part of the letter, the words were wom our in the original.

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A Family Record on this plan may be extended so as to include two, three, or more families, and contain all the births, marriages and deaths which have happened, up to the date of its formation. The figures in the first column denote the year of birth, marriage, or death; the other columns show the ages of every individual at the time of any birth, marriage, or death, of every other individual -comprehended within the limits of the Table.

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Among the early settlers of New England, were three persons by the name of Chase; namely, William, Thomas, and Aquila. The first settled in Yarmouth, and there died, in 1659, leaving two sons, Benjamin and William. The last two were certainly brothers, as appears from a deed given in 1667 by Aquila to “the sons of his brother Thoinas." The name is found in various places in English history, from the time of William the Conqueror to the present time. Thus, we find in 1326 a family of that name in Suffolk; a Thomas Chase, who was barbarously murdered in 1506; a Sir Robert Chase, Knight, in the West of England, 1628; a Sir John Chase in Exeter, prior to 1637; a Johu Chase, Esq., Apothecary to Queen Anne, 1690, &c. See Magna Britannia, Lysson's London, Polwheles' Devonshire, and other works.

Thomas and Aquila? Chase were among the first settlers of Hampton,

N. H., in 1639. Thomas? there married Elizabeth Philbrick, danghter of Thomas Philbrick. He d. in 1652, leaving five children, all sons; namely, I. Thomas, b. 1643, d. a bachelor, Oct. 23, 1714. II. Joseph, b. 1645, m. Rachel Partridge, Jan. 31, 1671, d. Jan. 12,

1718. III. Isaac, b. 1647, m. Mary Perkins of Hampton, d. May 9, 1727. IV. James, b. 1649, m. Elizabeth Green, Sept. 2, 1675, and d. V. Abraham, b. 1651, was not married, and was slaine in ye warres,” 1676. Elizabeth, the widow of Thomas Chase, married John Garland, Oct. 26, 1654, who died Jan. 4, 1671. She then married Judge Henry Roby, Feb. 19, 1674, and died Feb. 11, 1677.

The children of Joseph' and Rachel Chase were as follows:

I. Hannah, b. June 6, 1672, d. June 10, 1674.
II. Elizabeth, b. March 11, 1674, d. Sept. 8, 1675.
III. Jonathan, b. March 14, 1676, and drowned, Feb. 1, 1696.
IV. Anne, b. Jan. 11, 1677, m. Sinkler.
V. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 14, 1685, m. Benjamin Hilliard.
VI. Rachel, b. April 27, 1687, m. Jacob Freeze.

The children of Isaac and Mary were as follows:
I. Thomas, b. 1677.

VII. Joseph, b. 1689, m. Lydia II. Rachel, b. 1678.

Coffin, 1714. III. Isaac, b. 1681.

VIII. Jonathan, b. 1691. IV. Abraham, b. 1683.

IX. Hannah, b. 1693. V. Mary, b. 1687.

X. Sarah, b. 1695.
VI. James, b. 1688.

XI. Priscilla, b. 1697.
XII. Elizabeth, b. 1703, d. 1719.

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The children of James ? and Elizabeth Chase were as follows:

I. Abigail, b. Ang. 27, 1681, m. John Chase* of Newbury.
II. Dorothy, b. March 17, 1686, m. John Chapman, March 16, 1705.
III. Mary, b. Feb 8, 1688.

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Aquila? Chase, brother to Thomas' Chase, m. Anne Wheeler, daughter

of John Wheeler of Hampton, removed, in 1646, to Newbury, where
he d., Aug. 29, 1670, aged 52. His widow, Anne, m. Daniel Mussi.
loway, June 14, 1672, and d. May 19, 1688. The children of Aquila
and Anne Chase were as follows:

I. Sarah, b. m. Charles Annis, May 15, 1666.
II. Anne, b. July 6, 1647, m. Thomas Barber, April 27, 1671.
III. Priscilla," b. March 14, 1649, m. Abel Merrill, Feb. 10, 1670.
IV. Mary, b. Feb. 3, 1651, m. John Stevens, March 9, 1669.
V. Aquila, b. Sept. 26, 1652, m. Esther Bond, ab. 1673.
VI. Thomas, b. July 25, 1654, m. Rebecca Follansbee, Nov. 22, 1677.
VII. John," b. Nov. 2, 1654, m. Elizabeth Bingley, May 23, 1677.
VIII. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 13, 1657.
IX. Ruth," b. March 18, 1660, d. May 30, 1676.
X. Daniel,” b. Dec. 9, 1661, m. Martha Kimball, Aug. 25, 1683.
XI. Moses, b. Dec. 24, 1663, m. Anne Follansbee, Nov. 10, 1684.

The children of Aquila and Esther Chase were as follows:

I. Esther, b. Nov. 18, 1674, m. Daniel Merrill.
II. Joseph, b. March 25, 1677, m. Abigail Thurston, Nov. 8, 1699.
III. Priscilla, b. Oct. 15, 1681, m. Joseph Hills, 1704.
IV. Jemima, b. -, a spinster.

V. Rebecca, b. m. Jonathan Moulton, Dec. 5, 1716.
VI. Anne, b. m. Abraham Foulsham, Oct. 27, 1703.
VII. Hannah, b. m. Joseph Hoyt.
VIII. Abigail, b.

m. Joseph Robinson.

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The children of Thomas and Rebecca Chase were as follows:

I Thomas, b. Sept. 15, 1680, m. Sara
II. Jonathan, b. Jan. 13, 1683, m. Joanna Palmer, 1703.
III. James, b. Sept. 15, 1685, m. Martha Rolfe, Dec. 17, 1707.
IV. Aquila, b. July 15, 1688, m. Mary Smith, 1712, d. 1714.
V. Ruth, b. Feb. 28, 1691, m. Nathaniel Miller of Rehoboth, May

29, 1716.
VI. Mary, b. Jan. 15, 1695, m. Horton.
VII. Rebecca, b. April 26, 1700, m. Stephen Moulton, Dec. 14, 1721.
VIII. Judith, b.

Horton.
IX. Lizza, b. m. Benjamin Rogers, Aug. 17, 1732.

X. Josiah, b. July 15, 1697, d. young.
XI. Nathan, b. 1702, m. Judith Sawyer, Nov. 29, 1723, then

Joanna Cheney, Dec. 30, 1740, and then Ruth Davis, June

9, 1763. Thomas? Chase m. for his second wise Elizabeth Mooers, Aug. 2, 1713.

-, m.

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* Son of John Chase, and grandson of Aquila Chase of Newbury.

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