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1862.

ORDER NO. 203.

attend to the business of the firm before HEADQUARTERS IND. Ex., SOUTHERN FRONTIER,

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the departments. He intended to return, SOUTH BEND, October To the soldiers and citizens who have been, and are as the business was remunerative and

now, engaged in the defence of the southern fron- satisfactory. Owing to the fact, however, tier :

that his family were unwilling to accept On the eighteenth of August last your frontier was invaded by the Indians. You promptly rallied the trials and hardships of a new frontier for its defence. You checked the advance of the life, he abandoned the plan, and having enemy and defeated him in two severe battles at

received a favorable offer of partnership New Ulm. You have held a line of frontier posts extending over a distance of one hundred in St. Louis from Colonel Musser, he miles. You have erected six substantial fortifica- accepted it and engaged in the practice tions and other defensive works of less magnitude. of his profession in that city in 1865. You have dispersed marauding bands of savages

But an experience of less than a year that have hung upon your lines. You have been uniformly brave, vigilant and obedient to orders.

in that staid, slow-going old city, satisBy your efforts the war has been confined to the fied him that he could not be content border; without them, it would have penetrated with such surroundings. The active, into the heart of the state.

Major-General Pope has assumed the command stirring life of Minnesota was far more of the northwest, and will control future operations. in accord with his tastes ; there, too, were He promises a vigorous prosecution of the war. hosts of early and warmly attached Five companies of the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin

friends. Meanwhile, in the latter part of regiment and five hundred cavalry from Iowa are ordered into the region now held by you, and 1866, Judge Atwater had returned to will supply the places of those whose term of enlist- Minneapolis and resumed the practice of ment shortly expires. The department of the south- his profession. He invited Judge Flanern frontier, which I have had the honor to command, will, from the date of this order, be under the

drau to join him in a partnership, which the command of Colonel M. Montgomery of the latter accepted, and returned to Minnesota Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, whom I take pleasure in intro- in the early part of 1867. During the ducing to the troops and citizens of that department, as a soldier and a man to whom they may

same year he was a candidate of the confide their interests and the safay of their country,

Democratic party for governor, running with every assurance that they will be protected and against William R. Marshall, but was dedefended.

feated. He was again the candidate of Pressing public duties, of a civil nature, demand my absence temporarily from the border. The inti

the same party in 1869, for the office of mate and agreeable relations we have sustained chief-justice of the state, against Judge toward each other, our union in danger and adven- Ripley, and was again defeated. It is ture, cause me regret in leaving you, but will hasten

needless to state that neither of these my return. CHAS. E. FLANDRAU,

nominations were sought by Judge FlanCol. Comd'g Southern Frontier. drau-on the contrary, he was strongly In the spring of 1864 he resigned the averse to the use of his name for either of position of associate justice and went to them. But he was intensely loyal to his Nevada to join Judge Atwater, as partner party, and as that party had stood by him in the practice of law in Carson and Vir- in the days of its prosperity, he would ginia City. Here he remained for about not refuse to be its standard-bearer now a year. He then went to Washington to that it was in a hopeless minority.

In 1867 he was elected city attorney Indian agent, as a military leader, as a of Minneapolis, and in 1868 the first popular speaker, he has demonstrated president of the board of trade of that that had he selected either as a specialty, city under its first organization.

he would as easily have taken a front In 1870, having received a favorable rank as in that of jurist. proposition from the firm of Messrs. Another striking characteristic is his Bigelow & Clark of St. Paul to form a grasp of mind, quickness of perception partnership with them in the practice of and power of concentration, united with law, he accepted the same and soon after great physical endurance and habits of renioved to that city, where he has since industry, enabling him to accomplish an resided. The firm has always enjoyed amount of labor, within a given time, a large and lucrative practice, and al- which but few could achieve.

These though there have been some changes in qualities were largely inherited, for in its membership (the present firm being youth he had not the advantage of that Flandrau, Squires & Cutcheon), it has thorough mental training which so largely always been ranked among the leading conduces to success. firms in St. Paul. Judge Flandrau is

Judge Flandrau has always been unipresident of the Bar Association of Ram- versally and deservedly popular with all sey county, and in length of practice), classes with which he has come in contact. if we are not mistaken, the oldest attor. The reason is not far to seek. He is natney in active practice at the bar of the urally gifted with unusual conversational state of Minnesota. But he is yet in the powers and a sunny, genial disposition. full vigor of his intellectual and physical He is also an attractive extemporaneous strength, and to all human observation, speaker, which makes his services sought is good for twenty years more of as hard on numerous public occasions. But more work as he has ever yet performed. than all this, his readiness to assume the

In this brief sketch of the life of Judge laboring oar in all enterprises in which he Flandrau, two or three striking traits of is called to act, thus relieving his associcharacter cannot fail to have impressed ates often of much hard work without themselves on the mind of the reader. pecuniary advantage to himself, have seAnd first the remarkable versatility of cured him the friendship of large nummind and talent displayed. This is evi- bers who dislike the labor usually imposed dent from the number of different occu- as a condition of success. pations in which from early youth he has And in view of what has been remarked, been engaged, and the numerous and it is needless to say that Judge Flandrau varied offices he has held. And in all is not less a success in social than in pubthese he has acquitted himself as though lic life. He is or has been connected each had been the sole occupation of his with all the social and business clubs in life. Though in fact, after arriving at St. Paul. From qualities before adverted adult years, each has been subsidiary to to, he is almost always requested to assist his main profession, yet, in politics, as at public dinners. He is not only the originator of wit himself, but the creator story of the leader, you tell that of his of it in others. With such characteristics times as well. most men would jump at the conclusion, Viewed ihus, it does not need to be said uttered by Daniel Webster in speaking of that the true story of the great Northwest the profession, as applicable to Judge cannot be told, as we are from time to Flandrau, viz.: “that lawyers work hard, time trying to tell it in these pages, withlive well and die poor." The first two out more than a passing reference to the parts of the proposition in his case are soldier, jurist, orator and high-minded true-fortunately the last not, so far as and liberal-spirited citizen whose name at present appears. On the contrary, may be found above. While his works Judge Flandrau, from the emoluments have largely been performed in behalf of of his profession and judicious, invest the section to which he belongs, his fame ments in real estate in the cities of Min- is National, and those who know and apneapolis and St. Paul, has accumulated, preciate his worth, may be found in every if not a fortune (as the word now goes), corner of the land. The events of his at least an ample competence, which busy and useful life have two reasons relieves him from dependence on his pro- for relation—they illustrate the days in fession for support and provision for his which he has lived, and they form a family in the future. And if it be true powerful incentive to the grand army of that "republics are ungrateful to those youth who aspire to walk also in the path who depend on them for support, it is of honor to reach the goal of success. not true that the citizens of republics are The qualities of courage, determinaslow to recognize deserving merit.

tion and industry that have made GenISAAC ATWATER. eral John B, Sanborn of St. Paul, Minne

sota, what he is, were not accidental gifts

of nature, but came to him by natural JOHN B. SANBORN.

heirship from a brave and self-reliant race

who “carved their history lipon the The historian who seeks to portray the granite rocks of their native state.” The life and advancement of a people, or the characteristics of his ancestry have ever subjugation of a wilderness to the uses been a sturdy self-reliance, an earnest of civilization and the domination of acquisition of knowledge, advancement man, must, no matter how far he may be in various departments of industry and under the control of theories pointing an intense love of country. The family otherwise, come at last to the individual descent in this country alone may be and seek his true relation in the lives and traced back through over two centuries, records of those by whom the works he and to a period over a century before the would describe have been performed. territory now comprising the state of Thus biography becomes not merely a Vermont was detached from the New sidelight to history but the very essence Hampshire grant, as it was then known, and vitality of history itself. In the when Reuben Sanborn moved from Hamp

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