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1900..........

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pendent relatives on account of military and naval | Regular establishment.....

$9,864,344.67 service since the foundation of the government: Unclassified ..

....... 16, 260,397.04 War of the revolution (estimate)..... $70,000,000.00 Total disbursements for pensions..3,598,015,723.69 War of 1812 (on account of service

without regard to disability)....... 45,625,899.24 SPANISH AND PHILIPPINE WAR PENSIONS Indian wars (on account of service

BY YEARS. without regard to disability)..... 8,822,387.20

1899..........

$28.606.81 1904.......... $3,106,931.78 War with Mexico (on account of seryice without regard to disability)... 39,397,733.57

332,905.25

$3,409,999.54

1905... War of the rebellion....... .......3,389,135,449.54

1901...
1,175, 225.76 1906..

3,442,156.53 1902.....

1,738,446.28 War with Spain and insurrection in

1907...... 3,471, 157.27 the Philippine islands................ 18,909,512. 131 130 2009 512421903..... .. 2,204,084.21 Total

18,909,512.43 NUMBER OF PENSIONERS AT DIFFERENT RATES. $6 and under..... ...... 57,281 From $17 to $18, inclusive.. 507 | From $45 to $50, inclusive.. 3.424 From $6 to $8, inclusive....296,128 From $18 to $20, inclusive.. 39,942 From $50 to $72, inclusive.. 3,051 From $8 to $10, inclusive... 70, 773 From $20 to $24, inclusive.. 31,786 From $72 to $100, inclusive. 644 From $10 to $12, inclusive..351,517 From $24 $25, inclusive.. 2,730 At $125..... From $12 to $14, inclusive.. 20, 436 From $25 to $30, inclusive.. 17,524 At $166 2-3... From $14 to $15, inclusive.. 29,201 From $30 to $36, inclusive.. 318 | At $208 1-3.... From $15 to $16, inclusive.. 5,447 From $16 to $17, inclusive.. 41,503

During the fiscal year 1907 the loss by death of during the fiscal year 1906 was 29.208 and the
survivors of the civil war was 31,201, leaving the deaths during the fiscal year 1907 were therefore
names of 644,338 survivors of that war on the roll | 1,993 more than in the year preceding.
June 30, 1907. The loss of this class of pensioners

REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS ON THE ROLL JUNE 30, 1907.
NAME.
Age. Name of soldier.

Service.

Address. Sarah C. Hurlbutt........

89 Elijah Weeks.............Massachusetts ...... Little Marsh, Pa. Phæbe M. Palmeter............ ... 86 Jonathan Wooley..... ..New Hampshire.....Brookfield, N. Y. Rhoda Augusta Thompson., ........ 86 Thaddeus Thompson..... New York............ Woodbury, Conn.

The last survivor of the war of the revolution of 1812 was Hiram Cronk of Ava, N. Y., who died was Daniel F. Bakeman, who died in Freedom, May 13, 1905, aged 105 years and 16 days. The Cattaraugus county, N. Y., April 5, 1869, aged names of 558 widows of the war of 1812 remained 109 years 6 months and 8 days.

on the pension roll at the close of the fiscal year The last surviving pensioned soldier of the war 1907.

THE HENNEPIN CANAL.
Preliminary surveys be- Total length-104 miles.
gun-1871.

Depth-7 feet.
Excavation begun-1892. Width at bottom—52 ft.
Work completed—1907. Width at water line-80
Canal formally opened feet.
Oct. 24, 1907.

Locks on main canal-32.
Length of main channel Locks on feeder-1.
-75 miles.

Total cost to 1907– Length of feeder--29.3 mls. ! $7,500,000.

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SHEFFIELDA
The Hennepin, or, more comprehensively, the
Illinois and Mississippi canal, extends from the
Illinois river near Hennepin to the Mississippi
three miles below Rock Island. The navigable
feeder extends from Rock River at Sterling and
Rock Falls to the main line near Sheffield and is
of the same size and just as navigable as the
main line. Water is forced into it by a dama
quarter of a mile long at Sterling.

WEDDING ANNIVERSARIES.
First-Cotton.
Seventh-Woolen.

Fifteenth-Crystal.
Second-Paper.
Tenth-Tin.

Twentieth-China.
Third-Leather.

Twelfth-Silk and fine Twenty-fifth-Silver. Fifth-Wooden.

linen,

I Thirtieth-Pearl.

Fortieth-Ruby.
Fiftieth-Golden.
Seventy-fifth-Diamond.

THE PANAMA CANAL.

CHRONOLOGY. First exploration of route, 1527. Advocated by Humboldt, 1803. Panama railroad built 1850-1855. Panama Canal company formed by De Lesseps 1879. Work on canal begun Feb. 24, 1881. Canal company failed Dec. 11, 1888. De Lesseps and others sentenced to prison for

fraud Feb. 9, 1893. New French canal company formed October, 1894. De Lesseps died Dec. 7, 1894. Hay-Pauncefote treaty superseding the Clayton

Bulwer treaty signed Nov. 18, 1901; ratified by senate Dec. 16; ratified by Great Britain Jan.

20, 1902. Canal property offered to the United States for

$40,000,000 Jan. 9, 1902; accepted Feb. 16, 1903. Bill authorizing construction of canal passed by

house of representatives Jan. 9, 1902; passed by

senate June 19, 1902; approved June 28, 1902. Canal treaty with Colombia signed Jan. 22, 1903;

ratified by senate March 17, 1903; rejected by

Colombia Aug. 12, 1903. Revolution in Panama Nov. 3, 1903. Canal treaty with Panama negotiated Nov. 18,

1903; ratified by republic of Panama Dec. 2, 1903;

ratified by United States senate Feb. 23, 1904. Canal commissioners appointed Feb. 29, 1904. Papers transferring canal to the United States

signed in Paris April 22, 1904. Bill for government of canal zone passed by the

senate April 15, 1904; passed by the house April 21; approved April 26.

of $15,000 annually, Majs. Gaillard and Sibert and Civil Engineer Rousseau $14,000 each and Dr. Gorgas, Jackson Smith and Mr. Blackburn $10,000 each.

PLAN OF THE CANAL. In September, 1905, a number of eminent engineers of America and Europe met in Washington, D. C., to make investigations and l'ecommendations as to the type of. canal to be built, as it had not been decided whether it should be a sealevel or a lock canal. They visited the isthmus and on returning to Washington formulated majority and minority reports, the foreign engineers favoring a sea-level and a majority of the Amei ican engineers a lock canal.

In a message to congress Feb. 19, 1906, President Roosevelt transmitted the reports of the board of consulting engineers and the isthmian canal commission and announced that unless otherwise directed by congress he would order the canal com mission to proceed with the construction of tbe iock type of canal. The majority of the board of consulting engineers, eight in number, including the five foreign engineers, favored a sea-level canal, and one member of the canal commission, Rear-Admiral Endicott, took the same view. Five of the eight American members of the board of consulting engineers and five members of the isthmian canal commission favored the lock canal and so did Chief Engineer Stevens and the secretary of war. The president concurred in the recommendation of the minority of the consulting engi. neers and of the majority of the canal commission

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Canal property at Panama formally turned over

to the United States commissioners May 4, 1904. President outlines rules for the government of the

canal zone and war department takes charge of

the work May 9, 1904. Gen. George W. Davis appointed first governor of

canal zone May 9, 1904. John F. Wallace appointed chief engineer May

10, 1904; resigned June 29, 1905. Republic of Panama paid May 21, 1904. First payment on $40,000,000 to French canal com

pany made May 24, 1904. Lorin C. Collins appointed Supreme court judge

for canal zone June 17, 1905. New commission with Theodore P. Shonts as chairman named April 3, 1905: Shonts resigned March

4, 1907. John F. Stevens appointed chief engineer June 29,

1905; resigned Feb. 26. 1907. Maj. George W. Goethals appointed chief engineer Feb. 26, 1907.

CANAL COMMISSION. Lieut.-Col. George W. Goethals, U. S. A., chair

man and chief engineer. Maj. David Du B. Gaillard, U. S. A., corps of en

gineers. Maj. William L. Sibert, U. S. A., corps of engi

neers. Col. William C. Gorgas, U. S. A., medical de

partment.
Harry H. Rousseau, U. S. N., civil engineer.
Jackson Smith, civilian.
Joseph C. S. Blackburn, civilian.
Headquarters of commission in Panama.
As chairman Col. Goeth-

receive a salary

that the lock plan be adopted. This was also the view taken by the members of the 59th congress, which at its first session passed a bill directing that a lock canal should be constructed. It was also determined that all the materials used in building the canal should be purchased in the United States.

The canal begins in the bay of Limon, a mile northwest of the city of Colon on the Atlantic side, with a channel 500 feet in width and 41 feet in depth at mean tide, running due south to the shore line of Limon bay, at the mouth of the Mindi river. This distance is 412 miles. Then the canal passes through low and swampy ground in a southerly direction 3 miles to the town of Gatun, the width for this stretch being 500 feet and the depth 45 feet. At Gatun there is a space between the hills of over 7,000 feet, through which the waters of the Chagres river and its tributaries flow to the sea. This space is buttressed on either side with rocks and hills and about midway 'in this space there is a mountain of rock and eartlı, in which it is proposed to excavate a diversion channel through which the Chagres river will flow during the construction of the earth dam. The plan is to construct this dam across the entire space at a height of 135 feet above sea level and create a lake. Vessels are to be raised to the level of the lake, to be known as Lake Gatun, by three duplicate locks ranging in a flight of steps, each lock being 900 feet interior length, 95 feet wide, 40 feet deep over the miter sills, with a lift in each lock of 28 2-3 feet. These six locks, constructed of a mass of masonry and concrete, will be buried in Gatun hill and founded on rock throughout. Lake Gatun, when created by the

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construction of this dam, will be 171 square miles

Length, Per cent in area and will form the summit level of the Width.

miles of route. canal, which will be 85 feet above sea level. The 1,000 feet...

..19.08

38.4 total length of the lake will be 30 miles, of which 800 feet.....

...... 3.86

7.8 23 miles will be navigated by ships crossing the 500 feet....

...12.29

24.7 isthmus. Its depth will be about 75 feet in the 300 feet......

... 7.21

14.5 immediate vicinity of the dam, this being main 200 feet......

... 4.70

9.4 tained with little reduction to Bohio (a distance Locks and approaches....

... 2.58

5.2 of about 10 miles), and thence reducing gradually

Total ................................49.72

100.0 toward Obispo, where the depth of 45 feet will be obtained with but little excavation, the bed of the

WORK ACCOMPLISHED river being about 45 feet below the surface of the The total amount of excavation by the French future lake.

was 70,600,000 cubic yards and the total amount For 15.69 miles above the Gatun locks the deep excavated by the Americans up to April 1, 1907, portion of the lake will have generally a width

was 5,575,000 cubic yards. The total estimated exexceeding half a mile and only a small amount

cavation then remaining to complete an 85-foot of excavation will be required to provide a nay

level canal was 114,515,000 cubic yards. The recigable channel nowhere less than 1,000 feet wide ord of excavation since the American occupation at the bottom and 45 feet deep. Farther up the up to Aug. 1, 1907, was: lake, as the amount of excavation required to ob Year.

Cubic yards. Year.

Cubic yards. tain a depth of 45 feet increases, the minimum 1904..

.. 183, 365 1907*... ..... 7.039,583 width of the channel will be decreased, first to 1905.....

. 1,799,227 800 feet for a distance of 3.86 miles from San

1906.
4,909,277

13,931,452 Pablo to Juan Grande, then to 500 feet for 3.73

*Seven months only. miles to Obispo, and to 300 feet for 1.55 miles Toward the close of 1907 the excavation was pro- . from Obispo to Las Cascades, where the channel ceeding at a rate in excess of 1,000,000 cubic yards will be further narrowed to 200 feet through the a month. heaviest portion of the great central mass known

CANAL FINANCES.

APPROPRIATIONS. For a distance of 4.7 miles through the deep | June 28, 1902* ....

..$10,000,000.00 portion of the Culebra cut the channel is to have Dec. 21, 1905.....

.. 11,000,000.00 a bottom width of 200 feet and to have nearly Feb. 27, 1906......

5,990,786.00 vertical sides below the water line and then will June 30, 1906......

.. 25, 456,415.08 become 300 feet wide for 1.88 miles to the Pedro March 4. 1907...

.. 27,161,367.50 Miguel locks, where the summit level will end.

Total .............

.. 79, 608,558.58 The duplicate locks at Pedro Miguel will have one

*Bill limits total amount to be thereafter aplift of 31 feet. Passing the locks the channel will be 500 feet wide for 1.64 miles, 'then increasing to

propriated to 145,000,000. 1,000 feet or more for the further distance of 3.38

EXPENDITURES, miles to the Sosa locks on the shore of Panama

For canal property, right of way and

franchises bay. This broad navigation will be in an artifi

.......... .....

... $50,000,000.00 cial lake created by three dams, to be subsequent

Panama railroad stock.......

157, 118.24 ly described. There are to be duplicate flights of

For material and supplies....

3,449,022.96 locks on the west side of Sosa hill near La Boca

General administration...

1,124,226.55 with two lifts of about 31 feet each from ordinary

Government and sanitation....

4,381,089.80 low tide to the level of Lake Sosa. From the

Construction and engineering.....

9,729,554.98 Sosa lock to the 7-fathom curve in Panama bay,

For plant......

12,138,852.17 a distance of 4 miles, the channel is to be 300

Loans to Panama Railway Co...

765,480.00 feet wide at the bottom and 45 feet deep below

Advances to Panama Railway Co.. 1,683, 646.90 mean tide.

Other expenditures........

1,020.008.72 The waterway may be summarized with refer Total ....

.. 84,449,000.32 ence to the channel widths as follows:

*Up to Dec. 31, 1906.

as Cuter portion of Iowed to 200" fere the chan

PROCEEDINGS AGAINST THE STANDARD OIL COMPANY.

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT. | section 13 of the revised statutes, providing that CHICAGO, ILL.

penalties for offenses committed under a repealed Indictments returned, Aug. 27, 1906.

act may not be remitted unless the new law exTrial begun, March 4, 1907.

pressly so provides, covered the indictments in this Verdict returned, April 13, 1907.

case. Judge Landis upheld the government's conFines imposed, Aug. 3, 1907.

tention and denied the amnesty plea. Total fines, $29,240,000.

The indictment under which the trial began

March 4, 1907, contained 1,903 counts, each Aug. 27, 1906, ten. indictments containing 6,428 ! charging the movement of a car of oil' either counts were returned against the Standard Oil from Whiting, Ind., to East St. Louis, Ill., or Company of Indiana by two federal grand juries from Chappell, ill., to St. Louis, Mo. On the trial in the United States District court, Chicago, for 441 counts were withdrawn from the consideration alleged violations of the act approved Feb. 19, of the jury on grounds not going into the ultimate 1903, known as the Elkins rebate law. The charge questions involved in the case. On 1,462 counts was that the defendant's property was transported the verdict returned by the jury April 13 was by the Chicago & Alton railway at rates less than guilty. Motions for a new trial and for arrest of those named in the carrier's tariff schedules, pub judgment were overruled. In considering the penlished and filed with the interstate-commerce com alty to be imposed Judge Landis summoned varimission as required by law. The offenses were al ous officers of the Standard Oil company to appear leged to have been committed during the period in his court to give certain information. Among from Sept. 1, 1903, to March 1, 1905.

others who testified was John D. Rockefeller, Judge Kenesaw M. Landis of the United States president of the Standard Oil Company of New District court at Chicago decided Jan. 3, 1907. Jersey. While on the stand July 6 he declared adversely to the demurrer of the Standard Oil that the net earnings of bis company in 1903, 1901 company to the indictments. The main point raised and 1905 approximated $179,800,00, and that the by the attorney for the company was that the in dividends a mounted to 40 per cent. dictments had no foundation, in that they were Aug. 3 Judge Landis pronounced judgment and returned Aug. 27 under the Elkins law, while the sentenced the defendant company to pay a fine of new rate law, passed June 29, remitted all penal $29, 240,000, the maximum penalty under the law. ties incurred prior to that date. This contention At the same time he directed that an order be be based on that section of the law which pro entered for a new grand jury to consider the convides that laws or parts of laws in conflict with duct of the other party to the alleged violation of the act are repealed. The government held that the law in these cases-the Chicago & Alton rail

THE PANAMA CANAL.

CHRONOLOGY.
First exploration of route, 1527.
Advocated by Humboldt, 1803.
Panama railioad built 1850-1855.
Panama Canal company formed by De Lesseps 1879.
Work on canal begun Feb. 24, 1881.
Canal company failed Dec. 11, 1888.
De Lesseps and others sentenced to prison for

fraud Feb. 9, 1893.
New French canal company formed October, 1894.
De Lesseps died Dec. 7, 1894.
Hay-Pauncefote treaty superseding the Clayton-

Bulwer treaty signed Nov. 18, 1901; ratified by
senate Dec. 16; ratified by Great Britain Jan.

20, 1902. Canal property offered to the United States for

$40,000,000 Jan. 9, 1902; accepted Feb. 16, 1903. Bill authorizing construction of canal passed by house of representatives Jan. 9, 1902; passed by

senate June 19, 1902; approved June 28, 1902. Canal treaty with Colombia signed Jan. 22, 1903; ratified by senate March 17, 1903; rejected by

Colombia Aug. 12, 1903.
Revolution in Panama Nov. 3, 1903.
Capal treaty with Panama negotiated Nov. 18,

1903; ratified by republic of Panama Dec. 2, 1903; ratified by United States senate Feb. 23, 1904. Canal commissioners appointed Feb. 29, 1904. Papers transferring canal to the United States

signed in Paris April 22, 1904. Bill for government of canal zone passed by the senate April 15, 1904; passed by the house April 21; approved April 26.

of $15,000 annually, Majs. Gaillard and Sibert and Civil Engineer Rousseau $14.000 each and Dr. Gorgas, Jackson Smith and Mr. Blackburn $10,000 each.

PLAN OF THE CANAL. In September, 1905, a number of eminent engineers of America and Europe met in Washington, D. C., to make investigations and recommendations as to the type of. canal to be built, as it had not been decided whether it should be a sealevel or a lock canal. They visited the isthmus and on returning to Washington formulated majority and minority reports, the foreign engineers favoring a sea-level and a majority of the Amer ican engineers a lock canal.

In a message to congress Feb. 19, 1906, President Roosevelt transmitted the reports of the board of consulting engineers and the isthmian canal commission and announced that unless otherwise directed by congress he would order the canal com mission to proceed with the construction of tbe lock type of canal. The majority of the board of consulting engineers, eight in number, including the five foreign engineers, favored a sea-level canal, and one member of the canal commission, Rear-Admiral Endicott, took the same view. Five of the eight American members of the board of consulting engineers and five members of the isthmian canal commission fa vored the lock canal and so did Chief Engineer Stevens and the secretary of war. The president concurred in the recommendation of the minority of the consulting engi. neers and of the majority of the canal commission

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Canal property at Panama formally turned over that the lock plan be adopted. This was also the

to the United States commissioners May 4, 1904. | view taken by the members of the 59th congress, President outlines rules for the government of the which at its first session passed a bill directing canal zone and war department takes charge of that a lock canal should be constructed. It was the work May 9, 1904.

also determined that all the materials used in Gen. George W. Davis appointed first governor of building the canal should be purchased in the canal zone May 9, 1904.

United States. John F. Wallace appointed chief engineer May The canal begins in the bay of Limon, a mile 10, 1904; resigned June 29, 1905.

northwest of the city of Colon on the Atlantic Republic of Panama paid May 21, 1904.

side, with a channel 500 feet in width and 41 First payment on $40,000,000 to French canal com feet in depth at mean tide, running due south to pany made May 24, 1904.

the shore line of Limon bay, at the mouth of the Lorin C. Collins appointed Supreme court judge Mindi river. This distance is 412 miles. Then the for canal zone June 17, 1905.

canal passes through low and swampy ground in New commission with Theodore P. Shonts as chair a southerly direction 3 miles to the town of man named April 3, 1905; Shonts resigned March Gatun, the width for this stretch being 500 feet 4, 1907.

and the depth 45 feet. At Gatun there is a space John F. Stevens appointed chief engineer June 29, between the hills of over 7,000 feet, through which 1905; resigned Feb. 26. 1907.

the waters of the Chagres river and its tributaries Maj. George W. Goethals appointed chief engineer flow to the sea. This space is buttressed on either Feb. 26, 1907.

side with rocks and hills and about midway in

this space there is a mountain of rock and earth, CANAL COMMISSION.

in which it is proposed to excavate a diversion Lieut.-Col. George W. Goethals, V. S. A., chair. channel through which the Chagres river will flow man and chief engineer.

during the construction of the earth dam. The Maj. David Du B. Gaillard, U. S. A., corps of en plan is to construct this dam across the entire gineers.

space at a height of 135 feet above sea level and Maj. William L. Sibert, U. S. A., corps of engi. create a lake. Vessels are to be raised to the neers.

level of the lake, to be known as Lake Gatun, by Col. William C. Gorgas, U. S. A., medical de. three duplicate locks ranging in a flight of steps, partment.

each lock being 900 feet interior length, 95 feet Harry H. Rousseau, U. S. N., civil engineer.

wide, 40 feet deep over the miter sills, with a lift Jackson Smith, civilian.

in each lock of 28 2-3 feet. These six locks, conJoseph C. S. Blackburn, civilian.

structed of a mass of masonry and concrete, will Headquarters of commission in Panama.

be buried in Gatun hill and founded on rock As chairman Col. Goethals will receive a salary throughout, Lake Gatun, when created by the

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construction of this dam, will be 171 square miles in area and will form the summit level of the canal, which will be 85 feet above sea level. The total length of the lake will be 30 miles, of which 23 miles will be navigated by ships crossing the isthmus. Its depth will be about 75 feet in the immediate vicinity of the dam, this being maintained with little reduction to Bohio (a distance of about 10 miles), and thence reducing gradually toward Obispo, where the depth of 45 feet will be obtained with but little excavation, the bed of the river being about 45 feet below the surface of the future lake.

For 15.69 miles above the Gatun locks the deep portion of the lake will have generally a width exceeding half a mile and only a small amount of excavation will be required to provide a navigable channel nowhere less than 1,000 feet wide at the bottom and 45 feet deep. Farther up the lake, as the amount of excavation required to obtain a depth of 45 feet increases, the minimum width of the channel will be decreased, first to 800 feet for a distance of 3.86 miles from San Pablo to Juan Grande, then to 500 feet for 3.73 miles to Obispo, and to 300 feet for 1.55 miles from Obispo to Las Cascades, where the channel will be further narrowed to 200 feet through the heaviest portion of the great central mass known as Culebra.

For a distance of 4.7 miles through the deep portion of the Culebra cut the channel is to have à bottom width of 200 feet and to have nearly vertical sides below the water line and then will become 300 feet wide for 1.88 miles to the Pedro Miguel locks, where the summit level will end. The duplicate locks at Pedro Miguel will have one lift of 31 feet. Passing the locks the channel will be 500 feet wide for 1.64 miles, then increasing to 1,000 feet or more for the further distance of 3.38 miles to the Sosa locks on the shore of Panama bay. This broad navigation will be in an artificial lake created by three dams, to be subsequently described. There are to be duplicate flights of locks on the west side of Sosa hill near La Boca with two lifts of about 31 feet each from ordinary low tide to the level of Lake Sosa. From the Sosa lock to the 7-fathom curve in Panama bay, a distance of 4 miles, the channel is to be 300 feet wide at the bottom and 45 feet deep below mean tide.

The waterway may be summarized with reference to the channel widths as follows:

Length, Per cent Width.

miles. of route. 1.000 feet....

..19.08

38.4 800 feet....

7.8 500 feet.

.12.29

24.7 300 feet......

7.21

14.5 200 feet....

4.70

9.4 Locks and approaches...... ...... 2.58

5.2 Total

100.0 WORK ACCOMPLISHED, The total amount of excavation by the French was 70,600,000 cubic yards and the total amount excavated by the Americans up to April 1, 1907, was 5,575,000 cubic yards. The total estimated excavation then remaining to complete an 85-foot level canal was 114,515,000 cubic yards. The record of excavation since the American occupation up to Aug. 1, 1907, was: Year. Cubic yards. | Year. 1904......

... 7,039.583 1905............. 1,799,227 1906............. 4,909,2

13,931,452 *Seven months only. Toward the close of 1907 the excavation was proceeding at a rate in excess of 1,000,000 cubic yards a month.

CANAL FINANCES.

APPROPRIATIONS.
June 28, 1902*..

.$10,000,000.00 Dec. 21, 1905...

. 11,000,000.00 Feb. 27, 1906....

5,990,786.00 June 30, 1906....

25,456,415.08 March 4, 1907.

27,161,367.50 Total ...

79,608,558.58 *Bill limits total amount to be thereafter appropriated to 145,000,000.

EXPENDITURES.*
For canal property, right of way and
franchises .....

.$50,000,000.00 Panama railroad stock......

. 157, 118.24 For material and supplies....

3,449,022.96 General administration.......

1,124, 226.55 Government and sanitation....

4,381,089.80 Construction and engineering

9,729,554.98 For plant......................

12,138,852.17 Loans to Panama Railway Co...... 765,480.00 Advances to Panama Railway Co....... 1,683, 646.90 Other expenditures.....

1,020.008.72 Total ........

. 84,449,000.32 to Dec. 31, 1906.

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PROCEEDINGS AGAINST THE STANDARD OIL COMPANY.

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT. section 13 of the revised statutes, providing that CHICAGO, ILL.

penalties for offenses committed under a repealed Indictments returned, Aug. 27, 1906.

act may not be remitted unless the new law exTrial begun, March 4, 1907.

pressly so provides, covered the indictments in this

case.Judge Landis upheld the government's conVerdict returned, April 13, 1907.

tention and denied the amnesty plea. Fines imposed, Aug. 3, 1907. Total fines, $29, 240,000.

The indictment under which the trial began

March 4, 1907, contained 1,903 counts, each Aug. 27, 1906, ten indictments containing 6,428 l charging the movement of a car of oil' either counts were returned against the Standard Oil | from Whiting, Ind.. to East St. Louis, Ill., or Company of Indiana by two federal grand juries from Chappell, ill., to St. Louis, Mo. On the trial in the United States District court, Chicago, for 441 counts were withdrawn from the consideration alleged violations of the act approved Feb. 19, of the jury on grounds not going into the ultimate 1903, known as the Elkins rebate law. The charge questions involved in the case. On 1,462 counts was that the defendant's property was transported the verdict returned by the jury April 13 was by the Chicago & Alton railway at rates less than guilty. Motions for a new trial and for arrest of those named in the carrier's tariff schedules, pub judgment were overruled. In considering the penlished and filed with the interstate-commerce com alty to be imposed Judge Landis summoned varimission as required by law. The offenses were al ous officers of the Standard Oil company to appear leged to have been committed during the period in his court to give certain information. Among from Sept. 1, 1903, to March 1, 1905.

others who testified was John D. Rockefeller, Judge Kenesaw M. Landis of the United States president of the Standard Oil Company of New District court at Chicago decided Jan. 3, 1907. Jersey. While on the stand July 6 he declared adversely to the demurrer of the Standard Oil that the net earnings of his company in 1903, 1904 company to the indictments. The main point raised and 1905 approximated $179,800,00, and that the by the attorney for the company was that the in dividends amounted to 40 per cent. dictments had no foundation, in that they were Aug. 3 Judge Landis pronounced judgment and returned Aug. 27 under the Elkins law, while the sentenced the defendant company to pay a fine of new rate law, passed June 29, remittied all penal $29,240,000, the maximum penalty under the law. ties incurred prior to that date. This contention At the same time he directed that an order be be based on that section of the law which pro entered for a new grand jury to consider the convides that laws or parts of laws in conflict with duct of the other party to the alleged violation of the act are repealed. The government held that the law in these cases-the Chicago & Alton rail

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