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GAMBLE. Robert Jackson-Born Feb. 7, 1851, near

Akron, N. Y.; graduat. ed from Lawrence university, Wisconsin, in 1874; admitted to the bar and removed to Yankton, S. D., in 1875, where he still resides; elected to state senate in 1885; member of the 54th and 55th congresses; elected as a republican to the United States senate in 1901 to succeed R. F. Pettigrew and re

elected in January, 1907, for the term ending in 1913.

JUDSON. Harry Pratt-Born at Jamestown, N. Y.,

Dec. 20, 1849; educated at Williams college; teacher in Troy, N. Y.; 1870-1885; professor 01 history in University of Minnesota, 1885-1892; professor of political science and dean of faculties of arts, literature and science in University of Chicago, 1892-1907; elected president of same institution, Feb. 20, 1907, to succeed Wil

liam R. Harper, the first president, who died in 1906. MULKEY, Fred W.-Born in Oregon Jan. 6, 1874;

educated in the University of Oregon and the law school of the College of the City of New York; practiced law in Portland, Ore.; chairman of the board of state tax commissioners; republican in politics; indorsed by vote of people for United States senator and elected by the legislature of the

state in 1907 to succeed

& John M. Gearin, Dem.; his term will expire in 1913. .

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GOETHALS, George W.-Born in Brooklyn, N. Y.,

June 29, 1858; graduated from West Point, 1884, and later from engineer school at Willet's Point, N. Y.; engaged in engineering work for war department at various places; constructed Colvert canals in Tennessee river; chief engineer of 1st army corps, 1893; appointed chief engineer of Panama canal in March, 1907. to succeed

John F. Stevens, who Copyright, 1907. Clinedinst, Washington resigned the post.

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NELSON, Knute-Born in Norway Feb. 2, 1843;

came to America, 1849; lived in Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota; soldier in civil war: member of Wisconsin assembly, 1868, 1969; state senator in Minnesota, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878; member of 48th, 49th and 50th congresses; governor of Minnesota, 1892, 1894; elected United States senator as republican in 1895, 1901 and

1907; term expires in * 1913; residence, Alexandria, Minn.

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GUGGENHEIM, Simon-Born in Philadelphia, Pa.

Dec. 30, 1867; educated in common schools and studied abroad for two years; went to Colorado in 1889 and engaged in mining and smelting; republican in politics; declined nomination for governor of Colorado in 1898; republican presidential elector in 1904; elected United States senator in January, 1907, to succeed Thomas M.

Patterson, Dem., the new legislature being republican. JOHNSTON, Joseph F.-Born in Lincoln county,

North Carolina, in 1843; served in the confederate army as a private from 1861 to 1865 and was wounded four times; practiced law at Selma, Ala., from 1866 to 1884, when he made his home in Birmingham; president Alabama National bank, 1884-1894; governor of Alabama, 1896-1900; elected United States senator in 1907 to suc

ceed E. W. Pettus, deCopyright, 1907, Bert G. Covell.

ceased.

OWEN. Robert L.-Born at Lynchburg, Va.; edu

cated at Washington and Lee university, graduating in 1877; engaged in teaching; began practice of law in 1880 and was president of First National bank of Muskogee ten years; also engaged in farming and cattle raising: nominated for the United States senate at the democratic primaries in Oklahoma June 8, 1907, and ap

pointed by the governor after organization of state government. POST, Regis Henry-Born in New York, N. Y.,

Jan. 23, 1870; graduated from Harvard in 1891; studied law; member of New York state assembly, 1899-1900; made auditor of the island of Porto Rico in 1903 and secretary of same in 1904, serving until he was appointed governor, March 5. 1907, to succeed Beekman Winthrop, anpointed an assistant secretary of the treasury

department; his official residence is in San Juan, Porto Rico.

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SIMMONS. Furnifold McLendel-Born Jan. 20, 1854, | WALCOTT, Charles Doolittle-Born at New York in Jones county, North

Mills, N. Y., March 31, Carolina; graduated at

1850; educated in public Trinity College, N. C.,

schools; turned attention 1873; admitted to the

to geology; assistant in bar in 1875; democratic

New York survey, 1876: in politics; elected to

assistant in United 50th congress in 1886;

States geological survey. served as internal reve

1879, and director of nue collector 1893-1897;

same from 1894 to 1907; elected United States

secretary Carnegie insenator in 1900 to suc

stitution since 1902; electceed Marion Butler, pop

ed secretary of Smithulist; re-elected in 1907

sonian institution la for term ending in 1913;

January, 1907; author of residence, Raleigh, N. C.,

many scientific books where he engages in practice of law.

and papers of acknowledged value.

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SMITH. William Alden-Born at Dowagiac, Mich.,

May 12, 1859; educated
in common schools; re-
moved to Grand Rapids
in 1872; admited to the
bar in 1883; republican
in politics; proprietor
Grand Rapids Herald;
elected to the 54th, 55th,
56th, 57th, 58th, 59th and
60th congresses; elected
United States senator
in January, 1907, to suc-
ceed Russell A. Alger,
who died in Washington,

D. C.; term ends 1913;
A. M. from Dartmouth college.

STEPHENSON, Isaac-Born in Fredericton, N.

B., June 18, 1829; went to Bangor, Me., in 1840 and to Wisconsin in 1841; worked on a farm and then sailed a schooner between Milwaukee and Escanaba; invested his savings in timber lands and acquired a large fortune; member of congress, 1883-1889; republican; elected United States senator in May, 1907. to succeed John C.

Spooner, resigned, for unexpired term ending in 1909.

WARREN. Francis E.-Born in Hinsdale, Mass.,

June 20, 1844; educated in common schools; served in civil war; removed to Wyoming in 1868; en: gaged in live-stock, real. estate and lighting busi ness; republican in pol. itics; member of the territorial council; governor of Wyoming in 1885 and 1889; elected United States senator in 1890, 1895, 1901 and 1907. his present term expir

ing in 1913; chairman of committee on military affairs. WILLIAMS, John Sharp-Born July 30, 1854, at

Memphis, Tenn.; educat. ed in universities of Vir. ginia and Heidelberg admitted to bar in 1877 and practiced in Yazoo City, Miss.; also engaged in cotton planting; was elected as a democrat to 53d, 54th, 55th, 56th, 57th, 58th, 59th and 60th congresses; chosen at state primary in 1907 to succeed H. De Soto Money as United States sen.

ator in 1911 after spirited contest; residence, Yazoo, Miss. RICHARDSON. Harry A.-Born in Dover, Del.,

Jan. 1, 1853; received a common-school education and entered business, becoming the head of Richardson & Robbins, packers, at Dover; interested in banking and in the Diamond State Telephone company, of which he was organizer: republican nominee for governor in 1890, but not active, in politics; elected United States senator

in 1907 to succeed James F. Allee; term expires in 1913.

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TAYLOR. Robert Love-Born in Happy Valley,

Carter county, Tenn.,
July 31, 1850; educated at
Pennington, N. J.; ad-
mitted to bar, 1878; mem-
ber congress, 1879-1881;
elected governor of Ten-
nessee three times, be-
ginning with 1886; dem-
ocratic in politics; ed-
itor in chief of Bob Tay.
lor's magazine; elected
in January, 1907, to suc-
ceed Edward W. Car-
mack as United States

senator; address, Vanderbilt building, Nashville, Tenn.

TILLMAN. Benjamin Ryan-Born in Edgefield

county, South Carolina,
Aug. 11, 1847; received
academic education: lost
an eye through illness;
democratic in politics:
was elected governor of
South Carolina in 1890
and re-elected in 1892;
author of dispensary sys-
tem of selling liquor un-
der state control; was
elected United States
senator in 1895 and re-
elected in 1901 and 1907;

noted as a lecturer and delater; his home is at Trenton, S. C.

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FINANCIAL DISTURBANCE OF 1907.

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or less donate securities

In the third week of October, 1907, a financial institutions with which he was connected; stock disturbance of serious proportions developed in markets were panicky. New York city when the firm of Otto Heinze & Oct. 21-Charles T. Barney, president of the KnickCo., which had attempted to engineer a corner in erbocker Trust company, New York, resigned: the copper market, was suspended from the stock bank's clearings refused; meeting of prominent exchange and the clearing house began an investi bankers held to consider situation. gation of the affairs of the Mercantile National Oct. 22-Knickerbocker Trust company suspended bank, the National Bank of North America and payment, though declared solvent by its officials; various other banks and trust companies. The Mayer & Co., stock brokers, failed with liabilipublic at once took alarm and runs on several in ties of $6,000,000; call money went to 70 per cent; stitutions began, resulting in some of them clos stock market demoralized; President Roosevelt ing their doors, either temporarily or permanently. in speech at Nashville denied responsibility for The trouble was worst in New York city, but it financial troubles; Secretary Cortelyou ordered also extended to the other financial centers of the deposit of $6,000,000 in New York banks. country, Pittsburg in particular suffering seri Oct. 23-The Westinghouse Electric and Manufac. ously from the failure of several of the Westing turing company of Pittsburg and three allied house enterprises. There were a number of bank concerns placed in receiver's hands; Pittsburg failures in Montana, Texas, Rhode Island and stock exchange closed; heavy run begun on the elsewhere. Measures were taken to relieve the Trust Company of America in New York and situation by the use of clearing-house certificates on the Lincoln Trust company of same city; and notes, the importation of gold from abroad, Secretary Cortelyou decided to deposit $25,000,000 the deposit of money in the banks by the govern in New York banks at once; committee of five ment, the issue of Panama canal bonds and of appointed by bankers to consider calls for asgovernment debt certificates. Savings banks re sistance; call loan made at rate of 125 per cent. quired notice of withdrawals, thus preventing runs Oct. 24-Syndicate of Wall street banks, headed by which might have had disastrous consequences. J. P. Morgan & Co., placed $25,000,000 in the By the middle of November, while the money mar stock exchange for loans on collateral; action ket was still stringent, confidence had been largely taken after all-night conference in J. P. Morrestored and business was resumed under more gan's art gallery; governor of Nevada proclaims normal conditions. The effect of the scare was a holiday to save several banks and trust comreflected in the reduction of imports, diminution of panies. receipts at the postoffices, discharge of employes Oct. 25-First National bank of Brooklyn, the by industrial concerns, lowering of prices in the Williamsburg Trust company, the Jenkins Trust case of some commodities, the countermanding of company and several minor concerns suspended; orders relating to projected enterprises and the issuance of clearing-house certificates demanded increase of commercial failures.

by brokers in New York; receiver for Union Among the various causes assigned for the finan Trust company of Providence, R. I., appointed. cial crisis were these: Overextension of credit | Oct. 26-New York clearing house decided to issue on inadequate securities to enterprises of a more certificates; announcement made that the same or less doubtful character, some of the New York plan would be followed in other cities. banks and trust companies being especially reck Oct. 28-Clearing-house certificates issued in Chiless in this respect; the lack of a sufficient cur cago and depositors in savings banks required to rency supply for the requirements of business at give notice of withdrawals; banks in Oklahoma all times and particularly during the crop-moving City, Okla., remained closed as a precaution. season; the disclosures of reprehensible financier Oct. 29-Secretary Cortelyou announced that the ing methods in connection with street railways and government would accept as security banking insurance companies as well as with railroad prop paper approved by the savings banks laws of erties in general; the fall in the value of stocks Connecticut and New Jersey and bonds owing to the prosecution of illegal | Oct. 30—Importation of gold begun by Chicago trusts by the government and adverse legislation banks. in many of the states, as, for example, the en Nov. 1-Secretary Cortelyou ordered $3,000,000 to acting of 2-cent fare laws and laws for the con

be deposited in Chicago banks. trol and regulation of public utilities; and, finally, Nov. 2-Weekly clearing-house returns showed degeneral extravagance in expenditures. Many, for crease in business of the country. political or other reasons, blamed the president of | Nov. 7-Total of foreign gold imported or engaged the United States for having inspired distrust by brought up to more than $40,000,000. his attacks upon certain unprincipled corporations. Nov. 14--Charles T. Barney, ex-president of KnickHis reply to this was that he did not believe the erbocker Trust, died from bullet wound. government's efforts would have anything but a Nov. 15-Clearing-house checks of small denominabeneficial effect upon the permanent prosperity of tions placed in circulation in Chicago; also used the country; and as a matter of fact even as re in other cities. garded any temporary effect, the trouble was due

Nov. 17–President Roosevelt ordered Secretary fundamentally not to the fact that the national Cortelyou to issue $50,000,000 worth of Panam! authorities had discovered and corrected certain canal bonds at 2 per cent and $100,000,000 in goyabuses, but to the fact that those abuses were ernment debt certificates at 3 per cent. there to be discovered RESUME OF EVENTS.

FORMER ECONOMIC CRISES. Following is a brief resume in chronological

Financial disturbances similar in some respects form of the chief events of the period when the

to the monetary stringency of 1907 occurred in the financial disturbance was most acute:

United States in 1814, 1818, 1837, 1857, 1873 and

1893. The crisis of 1837 was caused by excessive Oct. 17-Firm of Otto Heinze & Co., copper cor land speculations and the operations of so-called

ner agents, suspended from New York stock ex “wild-cat” banks; that of 1857 was also due to change; F. Augustus Heinze resigned from Mer land speculations, resulting in bank failures and cantile bank of New York; State Savings bank commercial de pression; that of 1873, caused by of Butte, Mont.. Haller, Soehle & Co., bankers overspeculation and the suspension of specie payof Hamburg, Germany, and House bank of Hous

ments, was precipitated by the failure of Jay ton, Tex., failed.

Cooke & Co.; and that of 1893 was attributed to Oct. 18—Entire board of directors of Mercantile fear of prospective tariff changes and the silver National bank of New York forced to resign by

legislation in congress. the clearing house.

RECORD OF LEADING STOCKS IN 1907. Oct. 19-Banks in New York Clearing House association advanced $1,800,000 to the Mercantile Na

Jan. 1 to Nov. 30. [From Dun's Review.] tional bank; National Bank of North America Stocks.

High.

Low. and Amsterdam National bank of New York un- Adams Express...........315 June 18 150 Aug. 14 der investigation: Charles W. Morse, associated | Allis-Chalmers ........... 167 Jan. 2 4 Aug. 16 with the Heinzes, resigned from all the financial Preferred ............... 4334 Jan. 3 14 Nov. 23

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Stocks.
High.
Stocks.

High.

Low. Amalgamated Copper....12144 Jan. 5 4194 Oct. 24 Homestake. Mining....... 85 Feb. 25 54 Oct. 23 Am. Ag'l Chemical....... 253Jan. 8 10 Oct. 22 Illinois Central............172 Jan. 3 116 Nov. 16 Preferred .... a ............

95 Feb, 20 75 Oct. 28 Interna. Merch. Marine.. 848 June 27 444 Oct. 21 American Beet Sugar... 234 Jan. 7 734 Nov. 16 Preferred ....

24 Apr. 25 11 Oct. 30 Preferred ........

80 Jan. 21 75 Mar. 5 International Paper...... 1842 Jan. 7 7142 Nov. 16 American Can............. 712 Apr. 11 3 Oct. 24 Preferred ....

81 Jan. 5 51 Nov. 22 Preferred .... ..... 6012 Apr. 10 34 Nov. 26 International St'm Pump 41 Jan. 7 8 Oct. 23 Am. Car and Foundry 243, Oct. 29 Preferred ...,

81 Jan. 14 50 Oct. 22 Preferred ....

78 Oct. 29 Kansas City Southern.... 3034 Jan. 4 18 Mar. 1 American Coal............146 Aug. 7 145 June 21 Preferred ...............

6134 Jan. 8 45 Mar. American Cotton Oil..... 3614 July 27 21 Nov. 7 Lake Erie & Western... 2812 Jan. 12 11 Nov. 4 Preferred ............... 90 Jan. 21 70 Nov. 11 Preferred .......

ererre'a ............... 6742 Apr. 26 3934 Nov. 11 American Express........ 247 Jan. 5 175 Oct. 21

Long Island............... 671% Jan. 9 30 Nov. 4 Am. Hide & Leather.... 644 Jan. 16 21 Nov. 14 Louisville & Nashville....1451, Jan. 5 8512 Nov. 1

Preferred ............... 301 Jan. 7 10 Oct. 24 Mackay companies........ 75%4 Jan. 24 40 Oct. 21 American Ice securities.. 88 Jan. 2 813 Oct. 23 Preferred ............... 71 Jan. 24 50 Oct. 23 American Linseed........ 1914 Jan. 10 63Oct. 24 Manhattan Elevated......146 Feb. 13 1007 Oct. 25

Preferred .... ........ 36 Jan, 7 1616 Oct. 29 Metropolitan St. Railway107 Jan. 23 25 Nov. 2 American Locomotive.... 75%4 Feb. 15 3212 Nov. 21 | Mexican Central.......... 275% Jan. 5 1284 Nov. 22

Preferred ...............1111. Jan. 16 83 Oct. 30 Missouri, Kansas & Tex, 4458 Mar. 1 2034 Nov. 22 Am. Smelters pfd. B..... 934. Jan. 7 60 Oct. 24 Preferred ......

7234 Jan. 4 53 Nov. 21 American Smelt. & Ref..155 Jan. 7 5814 Nov. 15 Missouri Pacific..... 9234 Jan. 5 441 Nov.

Preferred .... ........11738 Jan. 7 8134 Oct. 18 National Biscuit Co... ... 8614 Jan. 15 5812 Oct. 24 Am. Steel Foundries..... 1034 Jan. 5 45, Nov. 1 Preferred ..... ....11738 Mar. 5 Nov. 20

Preferred ............... 471. Jan. 7 20 Nov. 1 National Enameling...... 1538 Jan. 5 61, Nov. 21 American Sugar Ref......1371/2 Feb. 13 97 Oct. 24 Preferred .... ...... 87 Feb. 15 79 Mar. 28

Preferred .... .......131 Jan. 2 106 Nov. 27 National Lead Co......... 7644 Jan. 33 Nov. 15 American Tel. & Tel.....133 Jan. 4 88 Oct. 30 Preferred ...............103 Jan. 3 80 Oct. 23 Am. Tobacco pfd. new... 9814 Jan. 28 60. Oct. 23 New York Central........1347. Jan. 10 9114 Nov. 21 American Woolen......... 3612 Jan. 7 1212 Nov, 25 N. Y., Chi. & St. Louis. 6312 Jan. 10 9334 Oct. 30

Preferred ...............1027 Jan. 5 68 Nov. 21 1st preferred............110 Jan. 16 85 Nov. 7
Anaconda Copper......... 755. Feb. 16 2513 Oct. 18 2d preferred............. 9134 Jan. 7 41 Oct. 30
Atch.. Top. & Santa Fe.10814 Jan, 7 66%Nov. 22 N. Y., N. H'n & H'd.....189 Jan. 9 1273. Nov. 4

Preferred. .... .........101 Jan. 12 78 Nov. 26 N. Y., Ont. & Western.. 4838 Jan. 5 28 Oct. 23
Atlantic Coast Line......1333 Jan. 5 58 Nov. 21 Norfolk & Western....... 9244 Jan. 4
Balaklala Copper......... 11 July 5 15%Nov. 29 Preferred .....

70 Oct. 29 Baltimore & Ohio.........122 Jan. 5 773, Nov. 21 North American....... ... 8934 Jan. 4 37 Nov. 8

Preferred .......... ..... 9412 Jan. 10 75 Nov. 27 Northern Pacific...........18912 Jan, 710012 Oct. 24
Bethlehem Steel.......... 2012 Jan. 10 8 Nov. 2 Pacific Mail............... 411, Jan. 5 19 Nov. 16
Preferred ....
65 Jan. 9 23 Nov. 29

Pennsylvania Railroad... 1413, Jan. 8 10312 Nov. 1 Brooklyn Rapid Transit.. 835, Jan. 7 2634 Nov. Peoples Gas, Chicago.... 985. Jan. 4 7014 Oct. 30 Canadian Pacific..........19512 Jan. 4 138 Nov. 21

P., C., C. & St. L........ 78 Jan. 18 51 Oct. Central Leather.......... 40 Feb. 15 117, Nov. 22 Preferred ...............105

........10512 Jan. 5 6912 Oct. 25 Preferred ....... .....102 Feb. 8 68 Nov.

Pitts.. Ft. Wayne & Chi.168 May 31 163 Oct. 9 Chesapeake & Ohio....... 56 Jan. 2 2314 Nov. 22

Pressed Steel Car........ 57 Jan. 10 538 Nov. 26 Chicago & Alton.......... 2712 Jan. 5 84. Nov. 21 Preferred ........ ..... 997 Jan. 24 64 Nov 29 Preferred ............... 69 Jan. 5 48 Sep. 16

Pullman Co..... ......1814Jan. 8 13514 Nov. 15 Chicago, Bur. & Quincy..228 Sep. 5 200 Feb. 15 Chi. & E. Illinois pfd...120 Mar. 14 115 Mar. 19

Reading ...................1391, Jan. 7 7014 Oct. 24 Chicago Great Western.. 18 Jan. 2 67. Nov. 23

1st preferred............ 92 Jan. 7 73 Oct. 22 Preferred A............. 7134 Feb. 14 25 Nov. 7

2d preferred...... ...... 94 Jan. 7 67 Nov. 7 Preferred B............. 2619 Jan. 5 812 Nov. 22

Republic Iron & Steel.... 414/4 Jan. 7 12 Oct. 23 ...... 79 Debentures

Feb. 25 50

Preferred .....
Oct. 30

........ 100 Jan. 7 5014 Oct. 24 Chi., Mil. & St. P.......15712 Jan. 14 9212 Nov. 21

Rock Island............... 3018 Jan. 2 1114 Nov. 22 Preferred .... .......16512 Jan. 5 130 Nov. 15

Preferred ............... 6412 Jan. 5 2612 Nov. 22 Chicago & Northwestern.205 Jan. 10 126 Oct. 20 St. L. & S. Fran. 1st pfd. 70 Jan. 11 58 Oct. 7

Preferred .... .......234 Jan. 4 185 Oct. 23 2d preferred..... ..... 4838 Jan. 5 24 Nov. 19
Chicago Union Traction.. 614 Apr. 3 134 Oct. 18 St. Louis Southwestern. 2512 Jan. 7 1242 Oct. 20
Preferred
.. 1938 Jan. 9 1112 Mar. 14 Preferred

6212 Feb. 15 2542 Oct. 30 Clev., Cin.. Chi. & St. L. 927, Jan. 7 48 Nov. 22 Sears-Roebuck pfd........ 9412 Feb. 14 90 May 9 Preferred .. ............ 1081, Jan. 7

Sep. 20 Southern Pacific.......... 964 Jan. 14 6314 Oct. 24 Colorado Fuel & Iron.... 577. Jan. 8 14 Nov. 26 Preferred ...............1184. Jan. 14 100 Oct. 21 Preferred ..............

85% Jan. 19 31 Oct. 25 Southern Railway......... 34 Jan. 5 10 Nov. 21 Colorado Southern....... 3872 Jan. 9 17 Nov. 15 Preferred ............... 9414 Jan. 5 2912 Nov. 23 1st preferred........ 6942 Jan. 7 41 Nov. 21

Tennessee Coal & Iron..162 Jan. 4 98 Nov. 15 2d preferred ...... ...... 5812 Jan. 4 2914, Nov. 25

Tennessee Copper......... 5312 Mar. 1 17 Oct. 25 Consolidated Coal.. .. 9912 Jan. 14 80 May 24

Texas Pacific...... ... 3718 Jan. 7 1714 Nov. 21 Consolidated Gas.........14014 Mar. 1 74 Oct. 25

Toledo Railways & Light 29 Jan. 1 914 Nov. 29 Corn Products Ref. Co... 2434 Jan. 15. 8 Oct. 24 Preferred ............... 88 Jan. 28 46 Oct. 29

Union Bag & Paper Co... 812 Jan. 15 4 Oct. 24 Delaware & Hudson......22712 Jan. 2 123 Oct. 30

Preferred .... ..... 61 Jan.' 7 395. Nov. 29 Del., Lac. & Western....510 Jan. 24 36912 Oct. 20

Union Pacific..............183 Jan. 5 100 Oct. 24 Denver & Rio Grande.... 427 Jan. 7 16 Nov. 23

Preferred ....

96 May 2 75 Aug. 13 Preferred ............... 83 Jan. 2 53 Nov. 26

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe..... 491/2 Jan. 5 17 Oct. 23 Diamond Match.......... 12312 Apr. 2 12312 Apr. 2

Preferred ............... 89 Jan. 15 49 Nov. 19 Distillers' securities 78 Feb. 13 3734 Oct. 30

United States Express....115 Jan. 9 70 Nov. 6 Erie ............ 4414 Jan. 5 1214 Nov. 21

United States Realty.... 9012 Jan. 4 36 Nov. 4 1st preferred............ 757, Jan. 7 28 Nov. 21

United States Rubber.... 521 Feb. 16 134. Nov. 21 2d preferred... ....... 67 Jan. 7

Nov. 22

U. S. Rubber 1st pfd....1097 Jan. 7 6114 Oct. 30 Fed. Mining & Smelting.163 Jan. 16

Oct. 28

2d preferred............. 7819 Jan. 7 39 Nov. 21 Preferred ............... 97 Jan. 14

Oct. 24

United States Steel...... 5038 Jan. 7 217, Oct. 23 Federal Sugar. 6212 June 11 42 Feb. 5

Preferred ...............10734 Jan. 7 7915 Nov. 20 Preferred ..... ..100 May 8 76 Feb. 5

Utah Copper.............. 391/2 Mar, 4 13 Oct. 22 General Chemical......... 7512 Jan. 14 50 Oct. 29 Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke 97 Jan. 22 31 Oct. 24

Preferred ...............10212 Feb. 8 Oct. 23 Wabash ................... 1812 Jan. 2 8 Oct. 30 General Electric..........163 Jan. 22 8912 Oct. 25 Preferred ...

3812 Jan. 7 144, Nov. 4 Great Northern pfd.......18934 Jan. 2 10717 Oct. 30 Western Union Tel... 8414 Jan. 11 541) Nov. 29 Hocking Valley...........115 Jan. 19 Nov. 26 Wisconsin Central.... 257 Jan, 12 11 Nov. 25 Preferred ............... 94 Jan. 5

511 Jan. 7 28 Oct. 25

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INTEREST AND STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS.

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P. ct P.ct.

Yrs.
Yrs.

P. ct.
P. ct

Yrs.
Alabama...

Montana ...

Any Arkansas ...

10

Nebraska ... Arizona.......

Any

Nevada...... California.....

Any

New Hampsh Colorado.

Any

New Jersey.. Connecticut..

New Mexico... Delaware ..

New York.. District of Columbi

North Carolina Florida.

North Dakota. Georgia ....

Ohio .......... Idaho..

Oklahoma... Illinois ..

Oregon......... Indian Terri

Pennsylvania. Inaiana ....

Rhode Island.. Iowa........

South Carolina. Kansas....

South Dakota ... Kentucky

Tennessee.... Louisiana.

Texas ...... Maine.......

Any

Utah....... Maryland.

Vermont... Massachusetts

Any

Virginia. ..... Michigan.....

Washington... Mannesota....

10

West Virginia Mississippi.

10

Wisconsin Missouri.............

6 8 10

II Wyoming...... *Under seal 10. No law. Negotiable notes 6; nonnegotiable 17. SVaries by counties. Real estate 20. Under seal 12. Under seal 14. Days of grace on notes and drafts are given ana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi Missouri, in the following states and territories: Alabama, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Arkansas, South Dakota, Georgia, Indian Terri- Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Wytory, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisi- oming.

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NEWSPAPERS OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1907.

[From Ayer's American Newspaper Annual.] State or ter. D’ly. W'kly. Tot.* State or ter. D’ly. W'kly. Tot. * State or ter. D’ly. W'kly. Tot.* Alabama ..... 23 197 247 Louisiana .... 170 218 Pennsylvania..

900 1,462 Alaska ..... - 6 10 18 Maine ........ 16 99 158 Philippines ...

8 Arizona ..... 17

Maryland ......
138 192 Porto Rico ... 10

30 Arkansas ... 264 315 Massachusetts.

404

Rhode Island.. 15 California .... 479 756 Michigan ..... 578 794 S. Carolina....

114 157 Colorado ...... 275 363 Minnesota .... 667 795 South Dakota.

303 342 Connecticut .. 100 166 Mississippi. 203 241 Tennessee ....

234 Delaware .... 32 Missouri ...... 88 777 1 027 Texas .........

912 District of Co

Montana ....

76 107 Utah ....... lumbia

66 Nebraska .....

555 632 Vermont Florida 133 166 Nevada ....... 11 32 . 48 Virginia

32 163 Georgia ..... 297 389 N. Hampshire. 14 124 150 Washington ..

328 Hawaii ... 36 New Jersey....

384 West Virginia

159 210 Idaho .....

117
| New Mexico.. 5

Wisconsin ....

565

713 Illinois ... 179 1,141 1,699 New York.....

1,075 2,004 Wyoming .....

43 Indiana ..... 582 833 N. Carolina...

187 272 Indian Ter....

210
232 North Dakota.

286

Total in 1907. 2,533 17,132 23,819 lowa ......... 861 1,093 Ohio .........,

753 1,159 Kansas

644

Oklahoma Ter. 28 312 356 Total in 1906. 2,474 17,026 23,595 Kentucky ..... 29 232 323 | Oregon ........ 19 185 246 Canada ....... 118 844 1,221

*Includes periodicals of all kinds.

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• BIBLES SOLD IN A YEAR. Data obtained by William E. Curtis at the Bible House, New York. Figures are chiefly for 1905: Sold by Number. I Sold by Number. / Sold by

Number. American Bible society.. 2,236,755 Bible Institut'n of Halle 37,775 Finnish Bible society... 2,422 British and Foreign Bi

Colmar Bible society.... 1.241 Danish Bible society.... 43,086 ble society...... ..... 5,977,453 Hanover Bible society...

Gothenburg Bible society 10,000 National Society of ScotMecklenburg - Schwerin

Norwegian Bible society. 69,789 land ................... 1,590,881 Bible society............

3,196 Swedish Bible society... 13.089 Ilibernian Bible society.. 45,529 Mulhausen Bible society. 4,848 Basel Bible soc'y (Swiss) 30,278 Trinitarian Bible soc'y.. 89,177 | Prussian Bible society... 190.004 | Oxford University Press. 1,000,000 Bible Society of France.. 34,475 Saxony society.....

44,093 James Potts & Co....... 250,000 Protestant Soc'y of Paris 8,424 Schleswig-Holstein Bi

Thomas Nelson & Sons.. 50,000 Baden Bible society

ble society .....
4,168 A. J. Holman......

50.000 (Germany) .............. 12,160 Wurttemberg Bible insti

J. C, Winston & Co....... 50,000 Bavarian Bible society.. 14,322 I tution ..................

298,747 Miscellaneous .......

250,000 Bergische society, Elber

Netherlands Bible society 93,977 feld ..................... 142,112 | Russian Evangelical so'y

Total copies............12,667,153

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