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STATISTICS OF EDUCATION.

COMMON SCHOOL STATISTICS (1905-1906).
Population, enrollment, average daily attendance, number and sex of teachers.

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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS AND IN PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS

AND A0ADEM1KS (1905-1900).

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ENROLLMENT IN SPECIAL SCHOOLS IN 1900.

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City evening schools

Business schools

Reform schools

Schools for the deaf

Schools for the blind

Schools for the feeble minded

Government Indian schools

Indian schools (live civilized tribes)

Schools in Alaska supported by the government

Schools in Alaska supported by incorporated municipalities (estimated)

Orphan asylums and other benevolent institutions estimated i

Private kindergartens (estimated)

Miscellaneous, Including schools of music, oratory,elocution, cookery, etc. (est.).
Total

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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COEDUCATIONAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND IN COLLEGES FOR MEN ONLY (1905-1906).

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1N8TKUCTOKS AND 8TUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOMEN WHICH CONFER

DEGREES (1905-1906).

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President Roosevelt left Washington Sept. 29. 1907, and after assisting at the dedication of the McKinley mausoleum at Canton, O., on the 30th proceeded to Keokuk, Iowa, where he was met Oct. 1 by the governors of ten states. At Rand park in that city he spoke to 10,000 persons on the relations of the government to corporations engaged in interstate commerce. Referring to the charge that his policy was leading to a financial panic, he said:

"I do not admit that this has been the main cause of any business troubles we have had; but it Is possible that it has been a contributory cause. If so, friends, as far as I am concerned it must be accepted as a disagreeable but unavoidable feature in a course of policy which, as long as I am president, will not be changed. In any great movement for righteousness where the forces of evil are strongly intrenched It is unfortunately inevitable that some unoffending people should suffer in company with the real offenders. This is not our fault. It is the fault of those to whose deceptive action these innocent people owe their false position."

From Keokuk the president proceeded by steamer down the Mississippi to St. Louis, Cairo and Memphis, at each of which places he made addresses. At St. Louis on the 2d he touched on the matter of centralization as follows:

"I ask that the national powers already conferred upon the national government by the con

stitution shall be so used as to bring national commerce and industry effectively under the federal government and thereby avert industrial chaos. My plea is not to bring about centralization. It is that the government shall recognize a condition of centralization in a field where it already exists."

President Roosevelt's speech at Cairo on the 3d was largely devoted to the necessity of having a strong navy, and that at Memphis on the 4th, delivered before the delegates to the deep-waterway convention, consisted mainly of arguments for the improvement of the navigable streams of the country. He referred again to the complaints that his policy of prosecuting trusts violating the law was hurting business. He said the losses of innocent investors might be likened to those of persons who had innocently accepted counterfeit mon ey for services rendered. The government could not permit them to pass the counterfeit bills. "Just the same thing is true when it comes to enforcing the law against business men of great wealth who have violated It. People are always beseeching me not to enforce It against them because innocent outsiders may be hurt, or only to enforce it with a gentleness that would prevent anybody, good or bad. from being hurt. It is not possible to comply with such requests."

Leaving Memphis the president proceeded south to a place near the Tensas river in Louisiana. wliere he spent some time in hunting.

SUIT AGAINST MRS. MART BAKER G. EDDY.

In the summer of 1907 a suit" in equity was brought by relatives of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, head of the Christian science church, for an accounting of her property on the ground that through age and infirmities she was unable to manage her affairs and that she had become the victim of persons associated with her in religious

work. A board of masters was appointed by the Superior court at Concord, N. H.. to take testimony as to her competency and the hearings lasted several weeks. The proceedings came to an end Aug. 21 when the relatives, through their chief counsel. William E. Chandler, had the suit dismissed.

STATISTICS OF CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES.

[From special reports by census bureau.] June 30, 1904. there "were in the United States 1 estimated population. Distributed by sex, color, 1.337 prisons of all kinds receiving persons sen- nativity and race they were as follows for the tenced for crime. The total number of inmates main geographical divisions: on the same date was 81,772, or 100.6 per 100,000 of

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PRISONERS BY State or territory. No. Perioo,

Maine 496

New Hampshire 416

Vermont 274

Massachusetts 5,684

Rhode Island 604

Connecticut 1,125

New York.. 9.862

New Jersey 2,720

Pennsylvania 6,208

North Atlantic division 27,389

Delaware 160

Maryland 1,867

District of Columbia 46

Virginia 1,895

West Virginia 1,139

North Carolina 1,185

South Carolina 1,045

Georgia 2,579

Florida 1,234

South Atlantic division 11,150

STATES AND TERRITORIES.

State or territory. No. Pe,

New Mexico 265

Arizona 318

Utah 223

Nevada 129

Idaho 196

Washington 911

Oregon 399

California 3,355

Ohio 3,363

Indiana 2,138

Illinois 3,180

Michigan 1,995

Wisconsin >. 1,366

Minnesota 1,067

Iowa 1.255

Missouri 2,793

North Dakota 203

South Dakota 245

Nebraska 519

Kansas 2,876

North central division 21,000

Kentucky 2.221

Tennessee 1,997

Alabama 2.068

Mississippi 1,238

Louisiana 1.680

Texas 4,504

Oklahoma 22

Arkansas 884

South central division 14,614

Montana 571

Wyoming 230

Colorado 1,022

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Western division 7.619

Continental United States 81.772

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMES.

Against society

Against the person

Against property

Double crimes

Unclassified '.

Offense not stated

CONVICTED OF HOMICIDE.

Maine 44

New Hampshire 23

Vermont 15

Massachusetts 120

Rhode Island 24

Connecticut 74

New York 472

New Jersey 121

Pennsylvania : 374

North Atlantic division 1,267

Delaware 16

Maryland 124

Virginia 261

West Virginia 263

North Carolina 263

South Carolina 340

Georgia 793

Florida 304

South Atlantic division 2.364

Ohio 300

Indiana 178

Illinois 463

Michigan 173

Wisconsin 137

Minnesota 101

Iowa 116

Missouri 333

North Dakota , 33

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