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its legal liability for all payments in excess of the sum which should prove to be necessary for actual indemnity to the United States and its citizens.

HELP FOR CHINESE STUDENTS. . This nation should help in every practicable way in the education of the Chinese people so that the vast and populous empire of China may gradually adapt itself to modern conditions. One way of doing this is by promoting the coming of Chinese students to this country and making it attractive to them to take courses at our universities and higher educational institutions. Our educators should, so far as possible, take concerted action toward this end.

ROOT'S VISIT TO MEXICO. On the courteous invitation of the president of Mexico, the secretary of state visited that country in September and October and was received everywhere with the greatest kindness and hospitality.

He carried from the government of the United States to our southern neighbor a message of re spect and good will and of desire for better acquaintance and increasing friendsbip. The response from the government and the people of Mexico was hearty and sincere. No pains were spared to manifest the most friendly attitude and feeling toward the United States."

In view of the close neighborhood of the two countries the relations which exist between Mexico and the United States are just cause for gratification. We have a common boundary of over 1,500 miles from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific. Much of it is marked only by the shifting waters of the Rio Grande. Many thousands of Mexicans are residing upon our side of the line and it is estimated that over 40,000 Americans are resident in Mexican territory and that American investments in Mexico amount to over $700,000,000. The extraordinary industrial and commercial prosperity of Mexico has been greatly promoted by American enterprise, and Americans are sharing largely in its results. The foreign trade of the republic already exceeds $240,000,000 per annum, and of this twothirds both of exports and imports are exchanged with the United States.

Under these circumstances numerous questions necessarily arise between the two countries. These questions are always approached and disposed of in a spirit of mutual courtesy and fair dealing. Americans carrying on business in Mexico testify uniformly to the kindness and consideration with which they are treated and their sense of the se.

curity of their property and enterprises under the wise administration of the great statesman who has so long held the office of chief magistrate of that republic.

The two governments have been uniting their efforts for a considerable time past to aid Central America in attaining the degree of peace and or. der which have made possible the prosperity of the northern parts of the continent. After the peace between Guatemala, Honduras and Salvador, celebrated under the circumstances described in my last message, a new war broke out between the republics of Nicaragua, Honduras and Salvådor. The effort to compose this new difficulty has resulted in the acceptance of the joint suggestion of the presidents of Mexico and of the United States for a general peace conference between all the countries of Central America. On the 17th day of September last a protocol was signed between the representatives of the five Central American countries accredited to this government agree. ing upon a conference to be held in the city of Washington "in order to devise the means of preserving the good relations among said republics and bringing about permanent peace in those coun tries." The protocol includes the expression of a wish that the presidents of the United States and Mexico should appoint "representatives to lend their good and impartial offices in a purely friendly way toward the realization of the objects of the conference." The conference is now in session and will have our best wishes and, where it is practicable, our friendly assistance.

BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS. One of the results of the Pan-American conference at Rio Janeiro in the summer of 1906 hus been a great increase in the activity and usefulness of the international bureau of American republics. That institution, which includes all the American republics in its membership and brings all their representatives together, is doing a really valuable work in informing the people of the United States about the other republics and in making the United States known to them. Its action is now limited by appropriations determined when it was doing a work on a much smaller scale and rendering much less valuable service. I recommend that the contribution of this government to the expenses of the bureau be made commensurate with its increased work. .

THEODORE ROOSEVELT. The White House, Dec. 3, 1907.

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Edward P. Weston, the pedestrian who in 1867 | 25 days and 22 hours, by more than a day. His walked from Portland, Me., to Chicago in fast longest day's walk was from Ligonier to Chestertime, repeated his feat in 1907, though 69 years of ton, Ind., a distance of 95 miles, made Nov. 25. age. He left Portland Oct. 29 and arrived at the In 1867 he left Portland Oct. 29 and arrived in postoffice in Chicago at 12:14 p. m. Nov. 27, mak Chicago Nov. 28. His best record for one day on ing the distance of 1.230 miles in 24 days and 19 that trip was 82 miles. hours. He thus beat his record of 1867, which was I

STATISTICS OF EDUCATION.

COMMON SCHOOL STATISTICS (1905-1906).
Population, enrollment, average daily attendance, number and sex of teachers.

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No.

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES.

THEOLOGICAL. | LAW Schools. |MEDICAL SCHOOLS.
YEAR.

Teach- Pupils No.
Teach- Pupils No.

Teach

Pupils ers.

ers.
147 963
7,658
621 7.311

109

3,077 17,601 149 906 8,050

604

8.950 113 2.738 18,660 869 8,017

9,780 116 2,902 19,999 980 8,173

10,449 118 3,142 21.438 155 958 8,371

845 11,615

3,423 21,002 996 8.261

966 11,874 122 3,562 21,401 154 934 8,009

1,004 12,516

3,515 22,752 988 7,567

1,106 13,642 123 3,876 24,199 148 1,034 7.343

1,155 13,912

5,029 26,821 1,031 7,372 1,158 14.057

4.928 27,062 153 1,055 7.392 1,167 14,306

26.949 156 1.094 7,411

14,714

5,465 25,835 150 1.103 7.968

1,274 | 15,411

5,837 24,924

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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS AND IN PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS

AND ACADEMIES (1905-1906).

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INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COEDUCATIONAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND IN

COLLEGES FOR MEN ONLY (1905-1906).

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GRADE.

Elementary (primary and grammar)...
Secondary (high schools and academies).
Universities and colleges....
Professional schools...
Normal schools...

Total..............
Special schools.......

Grand total......

NUMBER OF PUPILS. Public. | Private. Total. 15,919,2781,311,900 17,231.178 741.950 132,449

924.399 51,335 97,229 148,564 11,572 50,197

61,769 59,429 9,508

68.937 16.783,564 1,651,283 18,434,847

456,271 302.395 758,666 17.239,835 1,953,678 19,193,513

INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOMEN WHICH CONFER

DEGREES (1905-1906).

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President Roosevelt left Washington Sept. 29, stitution shall be so used as to bring national com1907, and after assisting at the dedication of the merce and industry effectively under the federal McKinley mausoleum at Canton, O., on the 30th government and thereby avert industrial chaos. proceeded to Keokuk, Iowa, where he was met My plea is not to bring about centralization. It Oct. 1 by the governors of ten states. At Rand is that the government shall recognize a condition park in that city he spoke to 10,000 persons on the of centralization in a field where it already exrelations of the government to corporations en- ists." gaged in interstate commerce. Referring to the

President Roosevelt's speech at Cairo on the 3d charge that his policy was leading to a financial

was largely devoted to the necessity of having a panic, he said:

strong navy, and that at Memphis on the 4th, de"I do not admit that this has been the main livered before the delegates to the deep-waterway cause of any business troubles we have had; but convention, consisted mainly of arguments for the it is possible that it has been a contributory cause. improvement of the navigable streams of the If so, friends, as far as I am coneerned it must country. He referred again to the complaints that be accepted as a disagreeable but unavoidable his policy of prosecuting trusts violating the law feature in a course of policy which, as long as I was hurting business. He said the losses of inam president, will not be changed. In any great nocent investors might be likened to those of permovement for righteousness where the forces of scns who had innocently accepted counterfeit monevil are strongly intrenched it is unfortunately in ey for services rendered. The government could evitable that some unoffending people should suffer not permit them to pass the counterfeit bills. in company with the real offenders. This is not “Just the same thing is true when it comes to our fault. It is the fault of those to whose de enforcing the law against business men of great ceptive action these innocent people owe their wealth who have violated it. People are always false position."

beseeching me not to enforce it against them beFrom Keokuk the president proceeded by steam cause innocent outsiders may be hurt, or only to er down the Mississippi to St. Louis, Cairo and enforce it with a gentleness that would prevent Memphis, at each of which places he made ad anybody, good or bad, from being hurt. It is dresses. At St. Louis on the 2d he touched on not possible to comply with such requests.” the matter of centralization as follows:

Leaving Memphis the president proceeded soutb "I ask that the national powers already con- to a place near the Tensas river in Louisiana. ferred upon the national government by the con- | where he spent some time in hunting.

SUIT AGAINST MRS. MARY BAKER G. EDDY. In the summer of 1907 a suit' in equity was work. A board of masters was appointed by the brought by relatives of Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, Superior court at Concord, N. H., to take testihead of the Christian science church, for an ac mony as to her competency and the hearings lastcounting of her property on the ground that ed several weeks. The proceedings came to an end through age and infirmities she was unable to Aug. 21 when the relatives, through their chief manage her affairs and that she had become the counsel, William E. Chandler, had the suit disvictim of persons associated with her in religious missed.

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