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PRINCIPAL LIBRARIES, OF CHICAGO AND EVANSTON.

CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY.

| Librarian-Clement W. Andrews. Michigan avenue and Washington street.

Board of Directors-E. W. Blatchford, Robert T. Board of Directors, James F. Bowers, president; |

Lincoln, Henry W. Bishop, John M. Clark, Frank Bernard J. Cigrand, vice-president; Z. P. Bros.

S. Johnson, Peter S. Grosscup, Marvin Hughitt,

Thomas D. Jones, John J. Mitchell, Leonard A. seau, John W. Eckhart, Robert J. Roulston, John L. Novak, Graham Taylor, Julius Stern, Antonio

Busby, Robert Forsyth, Chauncey Keep and the Lagorio.

mayor and the comptroller of the city of ChiMeetings-Regular meetings of the board are held

cago, ex officiis.

Hours-The library is open daily, except Sunday. at 8 p. m. on the second and fourth Mondays of each month.

from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. Secretary-William B. Wickersham. Librarian-F, H. Hild.

The John Crerar library contained in October, Hours-Circulation department open 9 a. m. to 6:30

1907, 211,000 volumes and 50,000 pamphlets on the p. m.; Sundays, closed; reading room and refer

social, physical, natural and medical sciences and ence department, 9 a. m. to 10 p. m.; Sundays,

their applications. They cannot be taken from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

the library, but may be freely consulted by all

who wish to do so. The department of medical The public library is free to all residents of the

science, formerly housed in the Newberry library city. Books may be borrowed for home reading either at the main building downtown or at any

building, has now been moved to the main library. of the various delivery stations. The only require

where the Senn reading room is open to physicians

and students. ment is that the borrower must furnish a certificate signed by a property owner guaranteeing the

THE NEWBERRY LIBRARY. library against loss. At the close of the library year, May 31, 1907,

North Clark street and Walton place. the public library contained 339,664 volumes. The

President-E. W. Blatchford. aggregate circulation for the year was 1,986,664 vol

Librarian-John Vance Cheney. umes, which does not include the use of books kept

Secretary-Jesse L. Moss. on the open shelves at the main library or its

Trustees-George E. Adams, Edward E. Ayer, branches or the periodicals and newspapers used

Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Franklin H. Head. Dain the reading rooms.

vid B. Jones, Bryan Lathrop, George Manierre, Following is a list of the delivery stations.

Horace H. Martin, Gen. Walter c. Newberry, NORTH. 3. 770 W. Madison-st.

John A. Spoor, Lambert Tree, John P. Wilson, 1. 378 Orleans-st.

4. 821 S. Ashland-av. Moses J. Wentworth.

5. 1202 Milwaukee-av. 2. 633 Larrabee-st.

Hours-From 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. every day except 3. 477 Lincoln-av.

6. 355 S. Western-av. Sunday. 4. 2517 N. Hermitage

7. 862 N. California-av.

8. 1520 Ogden-av. av.

The Newberry library, Sept. 1, 1907, contained 9. 21 Blue Island-av. 5. 1665 Lincoln-av.

227,282 books and pamphlets. These are not circu10. 2020 W. Madison-st. 6. 226 North-av.

lated, but are kept for reference purposes. The 7. 4810 N. Clark-st.

11. 1201 W. Irving Park- library is open to the public. 701 Belmont-av.

bd.

12. 1269 W. Madison-st. 9. ........

EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 10. 1617 N. Clark-st.

13. 1827 N. Kedzie-av. 11. 1956 N. Halsted-st. 14. 1502 N. Rockwell-st.

City hall, Evanston. 15. 2738 N. 47th-av. 12. 1220 Argyle-st.

Free to residents of Evanston and open to others 16. 2092 W. 26th-st. 13. 1920 Evanston-av.

on payment of an annual fee of $2.50, or 25 cents 17. 1681 W. 12th-st. SOUTH.

a month. Reference department free to all. Li18. 1802 Milwaukee-av.

brary open from 9 a. m, to 9 p. m. week days. 1. 154 22d-st.

19. 1198 Armitage-av. Reading room open from 2 to 6 p. m. Sundays 2. 190 31st-st. 20. 781 W. 12th-st.

and holidays. Number of volumes June 1, 1907, 3. 3961 Cottage Grove. 21. 902 Ogden-av.

40,548. Librarian, Mary B. Lindsay. av.

22. 285 N. Lawndale-av. 4. 663 W. 43d-st.

23. 1684 W. North-av. 5. 49th-st. and Lake-av. 24. 180 Grand-av.

LEWIS INSTITUTE LIBRARY. 6. 44142 W. 63d-st. 25. 115 North Park-av.

West Madison and Robey streets. 7. 2876 Archer-av.

(Austin).

The Lewis institute library contains about 15.000 8. 89th-st. and Muske 26. ........................ volumes and 1,000 pamphlets. The public is adgon-av. 27. 1598 Armitage-av.

mitted to the reading room, but books are loaned 9. 9901 Ewing-av. 28. 1555 Harrison-st.

only to instructors and students. Throughout the 10. 72d-st. & Normal-av. 29. 149 N. Kedzie-av.

school year the library is open from 8 a. m. to 11. 531 E. 55th-st. 30. 867 W. 22d-st.

5:30 p. m. daily except on Saturday, when it 12. 3841 State-st. 31. 22d-st. and Troy-ay.

closes at 3 p. m.; during the session of the night 13. 572 47th-st. 14. 759

school the hour for closing is 9:30 p. m. Librarian, BRANCH READING ROOMS. W. 120th-st.

Miss Frances S. Talcott. 15. 11100 Michigan-av. 1. 1202 Milwaukee-av. 16. 246 W. 69th-st.

2. 3841 State-st. 17. 413 63d-st. 3. 226 North-av.

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LIBRARY. 18. 1079 75th-st.

4. 821 S. Ashland-av. At the university, 58th street and Ellis avenue. 19. 45th-st. and Marsh 5. 21 Blue Island-av. This library contains 461,385 volumes and 170,000 field-av.

6. 770 W. Madison-st. pamphlets. It is primarily for the use of the 20. 8670 Vincennes-av. 7. Hamilton Park.

students at the university, but others may have 21. 5521 Halsted-st. 8. Davis-sq.

all the privileges upon the payment of a fee. 22. ... 9. Armour-sq.

Properly accredited scholars visiting Chicago will 23. 33d-st. & Shields-av. 10. Bessemer park.

receive complimentary cards for_a term of four 24. 7502 Saginaw-av.

BRANCH LIBRARY.

weeks or less upon application. The reading room WEST.

is open to all and contains a substation of the 49th-st. and Lake-av. (T. 1. 485 S. Clinton-st.

Chicago public library. The librarian is Zella Allen

B. Blackstone memo Dixson, L. H. D. 2. 547 Grand-av.

rial branch). THE JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY.

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY. 87 Wabash avenue, 6th floor.

Dearborn avenue, corner Ontario street. President Judge Peter S. Grosscup.

Acting President-Franklin H. Head. Vice-Presidents-Henry W. Bishop and Thomas D. | First Vice-President-Thomas Dent. Jones.

Second Vice-President-Lambert Tree. Secretary-Leonard A. Busby.

Treasurer-Orson Smith. Treasurer-William J. Louderback.

Librarian-Caroline M. Mcllvaine,

eet.

Secretary-John P. Wilson.

p. m. The library is primarily for the students Executive Committee-Franklin H. Head, Edward of the institute, but is practically- a free reference

E. Ayer, Joseph T. Bowen, William A. Fuller, library on fine art. Librarian, Jessie L. Forrester.
Charles F. Gunther, Samuel H. Kerfoot, Jr.,
George Merryweather, Otto L. Schmidt.

ACADEMY OF SCIENCES LIBRARY. The library, museum and portrait gallery are open to the public from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. on

In Lincoln park. week days. It is a repository of matter relating Consists principally of the publications of learned to the history of the northwest, particularly of societies of this and other countries and is espeChicago. It contains some 40,000 volumes and cially rich in the literature of photography, zoolo75,000 pamphlets and a large collection of maps, gy, geology and allied sciences, Oct. 1, 1907, the views, etc., illustrative of the development of library contained over 26,000 volumes and pamIllinois and the central west.

phlets. Open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. on week

days. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. Evanston, Ill.

ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE LIBRARY. The Northwestern University library contained

413 West 12th street. 65.941 bound volumes and 43,000 pamphlets May 1, Intended chiefly for the faculty and students of 1907. The library is open during the college year the college, but may be consulted by others on apfrom 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. daily, except Sunday, plying to the librarian. Open from 8 a. m. to 4 and during the summer vacation from 8 a, m, to p. m. The library contains about 20,000 volumes, 12 m. and from 1:30 to 5 p. m.

including many rare old books, 800 folios and a

complete selection of the classics. Four lending liPULLMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY.

braries are attached containing over 10,000 volumes 73 to 77 Arcade building, Pullman, Ill. for the use of special societies, making the total Contains 10,000 volumes. Library open from 9:30

30,000 volumes. Librarian, James O'Meara, S. J. a. m. to 5:30 p. m. a ad in the evenings from 6:45 to 9 o'clock. Librarian, Bertha S. Ludlam; as.

WESTERN SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS. sistant librarian, Miss Isabel Ludlam.

Rooms 1734-1741 Monadnock block.

The library is intended for the members of the GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE LIBRARY.

society, but others may consult it from 9 a. m. Evanston, Ill.

to 5 p. m., except Sundays and holidays. It conThis is a reference library of theology for the tains over 6,000 volumes, chiefly on engineering use of the faculty and students of the institute, and technical subjects. Librarian, J. H. Warder. but open to the public October to June, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Oct. 1, 1907, the library con

CHICAGO LAW INSTITUTE LIBRARY. tained 24,449 volumes. Librarian, Doremus A. Hayes.

1025 county building.

President-Lyman M. Paine.
HAMMOND LIBRARY.

Secretary-Alfred E. Barr.
43 Warren avenue.

Treasurer-Clarence A. Burley. The Hammond library of the Chicago Theological

Librarian-William H. Holden. seminary contains about 30,000 volumes. It is in-1,

The library is exclusively for the use of the tended for the use of the faculty and students of legal profession. It contains about 42,000 volumes. the Chicago Theological seminary, but may be consulted by clergymen and others. The library is

FIELD MUSEUM LIBRARY. open on week days from September to May from

Jackson park. 9 a. m. to 12 m. and from 1 to 5.p. m. and except on Saturdays from 7 to 10 p. m. Acting li

The museum library occupies three rooms in the brarian, Florence M. Freeman.

north end of the building and is open to the pub

lic every week day from 9 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. RYERSON LIBRARY. .

The library is a scientific one and is designed for

reference purposes only. Art institute, Michigan avenue and Adams street.

In the reading room the magazines are accessible The Ryerson library of the Art institute is de without application. Visitors can consult books voted exclusively to works on fine art. It con by making application to the librarian. tains more than 4,600 bound volumes and a col The library on Sept. 30, 1907, contained approxi. lection of 16,000 Braun autotypes. Open every day mately 40,000 books and pamphlets. Librarian, except Sundays and holidays from 9 a. m. to 5 | Elsie Lippincott.

Evan übrarpents of Junerary CoA.

MUNICIPAL LODGING HOUSE.

..

528

10 North Union street, The municipal lodging house is for the benefit of

1905. deserving poor who are temporarily out of employ Situations supplied.....

4,960 ment. Those who are able to work are compelled Cripples received.............. to perform three hours of labor in return for lodg

Sent to county agent....... .. 193 ing and breakfast. Statistics for the calendar

Skilled laborers received...... ... 4,634 years 1905 and 1906 and the first four months of Unskilled laborers received...... 9,601 1907 follow:

Sent to county hospital......

100 1905. 1906. 1907.

Sent to the Bureau of Charities 65 Lodgings given....................14,235 13,503 8,239 Sent to dispensary ................ 972 Meals served......................28,707 27,016 16,478 | Vaccinations ...................... 257

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CHICAGO BUILDING STATISTICS.

Year. 1890.. 1891..... 1892.... 1893..... 1894..... 1895.....

Number of buildings erected since 1890, with estimated cost.
Buildings. Cost. Year.
Buildings. Cost. 1 Year.

Buildings.
.......11, 608 $ 47,322,100 1896.

6,444 $22,730,615 1902..

6,074
...11,805 54,201.800 1897.... .... 5.294 21,777,230 1903.... ... 6,221
.13,194 64,740,800 1898.... .... 4,067 21, 294,325

7,151
8,559 28,708, 750 1899.
3,794 20,856,750 1905.....

8,442
9,755 33,863,465 1900... ...... 3,554 19, 100,0501906..... ....10,629
8,633 35,010,043 | 1901.............. 6,053 34,962,075 | 1907*..... .... 5,094

*Jan. 1. to July 1.

Cost. $48,070,390 37,447,175 44,724,790 63,970,950 64,822,030 31,032,500

CHICAGO WATERWORKS SYSTEM.

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The following table shows the growth of Chi. One 7-foot tunnel from Park row shaft to foot of
cago's waterworks system by decades since 1854, Peck place and thence to Harrison street pump-
when the first large pumping station at Chicago ing station; built 1891; cost $279,848.78.
avenue and the lake was built, and by years since One 6-foot connecting tunnel in Jefferson street from
1900:

Van Buren to Harrison; built 1891; cost $15,968.17.
Population Gallons Gallons Water

One 10-foot tunnel foot of Oak street to Green
(school pumped per pipe Total

street and Grand avenue, and two 8-foot tunYear. census). . per day.capita. mileage. revenue.

nels from that point to Central Park avenue and 1854.. 65,872 591,083 8.9 30.0

Springfield avenue pumping stations respectively; 1860.. 109,260 4,703,525 43.0 91.0 $131,162.00

built 1900; cost $2,121,525.02. 1870.. 306, 605 21,766,260 70.

9 272.4 539,180.00 1880.. 491,516 57,384,376 116.7 455.4

One 7-foot tunnel connecting above 10-foot tunnel 865,618.35

with Chicago avenue pumping station (remodeled); 1890.. 1,208,669 152,372,288 126.0 1,205.0 2,109,508.00 1900.. 2,007,695 322,599,630 160.6 1,872.0 3,250,481.85

built 1898; cost $42,436.45. 1901.. *1,786,266 342,824,449 191.9 1,890.0 3,370, 600.88

One 9-foot tunnel from 104th street and Stewart 1902.. *1,844,661 358, 101, 710 194.1 1,918.0 3,611,558.81 avenue to 73d and State streets; one 12-foot tun. 1903.. *1,903,096 376,015,974 196.0 1,939.0 3,689,625.80

nel in 73d street from State street to Yates ave1904.. *1,962,251 398,985,350 203.3 1,978.0 3,834,541.30

nue, and one 14 foot tunnel from Yates avenue 1905.. *2.060,000 410,850,106 200.0 2,038.0 4,019,205.88

to Railroad avenue; in course of construction 1906.. 2,140,000 436,954,473 204.2 2.073.0 4,281,065.50

(1907). *Federal census estimate

One 7-foot tunnel in Polk street connecting Peck

place shaft and Jefferson street shaft; in course In 1906 the total amount of water pumped was

of construction (1907). 160,184,636,656 gallons. For the first six months of

One 8-foot tunnel from 1907 the amount pumped was 81,727,255,870 gallons

Chicago avenue to 22d and the revenue $2,222,233.60.

street and Ashland avenue; in course of conThe pumping stations, with the year of construc

struction (1907). tion and capacity per day in.gallons (August, 1907), WATER-PIPE TUNNELS UNDER CHICAGO are:

RIVER.
Chicago avenue (1854)...

..........
.. 99,000,000

Dimen'ns Length Year
Twenty-second street (1875)

65,000,000
in ft. in ft. built. Cost.

Location.
Harrison street (1889)....

30,000,000

......

280 1871 $7,550.00 Adams-st. Lake View (1892).........

45,000,000 6. ...

249 1871 7.633.00 Archer-av. Fourteenth street (1892)..

95.000,000

1891 17,453.56 Ashland-av. Sixty-eighth street (1892)..

93,500,000
6.....

306 1871 7,750.00 Chicago-av. Washington Heights (1892)

. 4,000,000
5......

227 1880 6,875.00 Clybourn-pl. Norwood Park (1897).....

. 1,000,000
6.....

1903 13,324.00 Division-st.* Central Park (1900)......

..100,000.000

7x842..

330 1871 11, 220.00 Division-st. Springfield avenue (1901).

.100,000,000

8.......... 297 1880 14,649.00 18th-st. Rogers Park (1899).....

3,000,000 64x9...... 314 1880 7,883.00 Harrison-st.

6x7....... 1,548 1899 35,561.75 Drainage canal. Total capacity per day........ .........635,500,000

5..... 403 1895 29,614.58 N. Western-av, One 5-foot tunnel from two-mile crib to Chicago

485 1880 11,250.00 Rush-st. avenue pumping station; built 1867; cost $464, 7x10.. 241 1892 17,495.20 35th-st. 866.05.

6....... 311 1876 7,550.00 Throop-st. One 7-foot tunnel from two-mile crib to Chicago 7x8........ 345 1905 28,584.54 Montrose-bd. avenue pumping station; built 1874; cost $415,

*Under canal. Three other tunnels were in course 709.36.

of construction in 1907 at Indiana street, Ashland One 7-foot tunnel from two-mile crib to Chicago avenue pumping station; built 1887-1895; cost

avenue and Diversey avenue. $342,786.64.

WATERWORKS CRIBS. One 8-foot tunnel from four-mile crib to 14th street pumping station; built 1892; cost $1,104,744.12. Name.

Built.

Cost. One 10-foot tunnel from Carter H. Harrison crib Two-mile ..

......1867

$106,679.63 to foot of Oak street; built 1898; cost $677.577.55. Four-mile ..

......1891 472,890.93 One 7-foot tunnel from Lake View crib to Lake Lake View....

...... 1896 164,085.82 View pumping station; built 1896; cost $701,792.45. Hyde Park.....

......1896 137,624.77 One 7-foot tunnel from Hyde Park crib to €8th C. H. Harrison.

.1900 232, 738.10
street pumping station; built 1898; cost $771,556.07.
One 14-foot tunnel from Hyde Park to 73d street VALUE OF WATERWORKS PROPERTY.
and Railroad avenue; in course of construction.

The total appraised value of the Chicago water-
LAND TUNNELS.

works property Dec. 31, 1906, was $42, 159, 443.27, One 7-foot tunnel from Chicago a venue pumping divided as follows: Real estate, $4,126,188.86:

station to 22d street pumping station; built 1874; buildings, $919,540.86; equipment, $1,999, 659.03; cost $542,912.63.

cribs, tunnels, mains, etc., $29,510,407.52.

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FIRE LOSSES IN CHICAGO BY YEARS.

no 17

Year. Fires. 1890.... 2,755 1891.... 3,353 1892.... 3,549 1893.... 5,224 1894.... 5.174 1895.... 5.316

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Insurance. | Year. Fires. Loss. Insurance. Year. Fires. Loss.
$47,937,840 1896.... 4.414 $1,979.355 $59.970, 130 1902.... 5,123 $4,118,933
59,703,511 | 1897.... 5,326 2.272.990 55, 233,596 | 1903.... 6.054 3.062,922
65,535,291 1898.... 5.048 2.651,735 56,550,470 1904.... 6,661 2,950, 254
180,987.890 1899..... 6,031 4,534,065 70,851,165 1905.... 6.505 3, 298,929
72,185,581 / 1900.... 5.503 2,213.69972,893.463 1906.... 6,291 4,143,386
73.443.646 | 1901.... 6.136 4.296.433 83,079, 743 I 1907 ... 3,1602,675, 725

*First six months.

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INTERNAL REVENUE COLLECTIONS IN CHICAGO.

First district of Illinois, calendar year 1906.
Collected on lists..... $31,015.38 | Tobacco ................$1,120,108.84 | Playing cards....
Fermented liquors..... 4,463,200.50 Special tax...... . 450,010.00 Filled cheese.....
Distilled spirits........ 171,381.32 Oleomargarine (14cent) 93,755.44
Cigars and cigarettes. 671, 434.41 Oleomargarine (10-cent) 226,860.50 Total, 1906....
Snuff .............

.... 114,521.23 Renovated butter...... 73,547.581 Total, 1905...

$39, 257.12

682.43

171,381.32 Special tas

Sngars and cigarettes:

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ARRESTS IN 1906.

CLASSIFICATION OF CHARGES.
Male. Female. Total. Felonies.

... 1906. 1905. 1904. 1903. 1902. Total number....... .......67,377 11,015 78,392 Abandonment of child

49 45 Married .... .......20,879 3,559 24,438 Abduction .............

27 33 Single

. 46,498 7,456 53.594 Accessory to burglary 17 Under 16...

. 3,765 193 3,958 Accessory to larceny.. 34 60513 666 From 16 to 20. 9,921 1,041 10,962 Accessory to murder.. 10

82 65 From 20 to 25. .13, 747 3.622 17,369 Accessory to robbery. 16

117

201 From 25 to 30. .10,961 2,095 13,056 Arson .................

33

21

22 From 30 to 40..... ..16,519 2,578 19,097 Assault, murderous... 915

502 567 717 From 40 to 50..... .... 8,595 1,056 9,651 Assault, by robbers..

191
122 154 186

137 From 50 to 60.....

2,929

3,239 Attempted burglary... 88 78 97 91 130 More than 60. 120 1,060 Bigamy ................

19

47 44 8 Burglary ..... ........

1,739 1,780 1,388 1,616 1,653 OCCUPATIONS OF PRISONERS.

Confidence game.. 501 535 304 267 154
Counterfeiting

5
59, Liverymen
Actors

....

11
Embezzlement

115 110 127 196 Agents 428 Machinists ...

Forgery

87 .........

64 85

66 Artists ... 18 Masons ......

187
Kidnaping .....

11
Attorneys.
78 Merchants

Larceny .....

5,329 5,234 4,732 5,398 5,051 Bakers ..... 337 Midwives .... Malicious misch

553 567 • 674 665 Barbers 485 Milkmen .... Manslaughter.

11 30 Barkeepers Miners

Mayhem Billposters 29 Moiders

.............. 441

Murder ...... Blacksmiths

Musicians

153

Passing counterfeits.. 13 Boilermakers .. 147 None .....

15,508

8 Perjury

19 72 Painters ... Brokers .......

1,022 Butchers .....

Receiving stolen prop-
Peddlers
152

1,378
erty .................

..... 485 371 387 445 357 Carpenters ..

835
Physicians

85
Robbery ..... ........ 1,001 1,200 922

832

933 Clergymen

116 12 Plasterers

Other felonies......... 808 674 711 688 111 Cigarmakers ... 153 Plumbers Clerks 5,144 | Policemen ... 23

STATE MISDEMEANORS. Constables

Porters

1,005 Abandonment of wife Cooks .....

Printers

552 or children........... 547 424 320 314 Dentists ......

Prostitutes

.. 3,372

Assault ............... 2,698 2,431 2,648 3,803 4,259 Detectives ... Roofers

Assault with deadly
Druggists

93
Sailors

161

weapons ............ 1,054 1,010 868 920 432 Electricians 335 Salesmen

752 Carrying concealed Engineers 297 Saloonkeepers 2,109

weapons ............. 1,330 1,160 576 610 911 Farmers 102 Servants Cruelty to animals.... 162

142 Firemen 279 Shoemakers .... 205 Cruelty to children... 52

3

2 Florists .... Steamfitters

Having gaming devices 913 689 Grocers 93 Stonecutters

56 Illegal voting.......... Harnessmakers 56 Students ...... 100 Irtimidation ..

46

140 Horseshoers 80 Tailors ......

728 False pretenses....... 403 431 457 351 Hostlers 99 Teamsters

4,140 Riot .....

.::............... 31 241 1 39 49 Housekeepers .. .. 3,163 Tinsmiths

126 Selling liquor to drunkJanitors 396 Undertakers ...

30 ards or minors...... Jewelers 38 Upholsterers

Extortion by threats. Junk dealers.. 235 | Wagonmakers.

Other state misdeLaborers ..18.687 Watchmen

meanors ............. 1,680 1,370 1,979 2,356 139 Lathers 56 | Other occupations.. 9,021

VIOLATION OF CITY ORDINANCES. · NATIVITY OF PRISONERS.

Disorderly ............49,230 45,847 45,577 40,186 34,405

Doing business without 1906. 1905. 1904 1903 1902. license .............. 319 276 658 594 351 American

.45,162 40,948 40,041 47,530 42,805 Inmates of disorderly Colored

6,465 5,863 5,328 6,485 5.911 house ................ 1,972 1,295 691 1,128 1,401 Austrian .... ... 1,098 664 590 734 471 Inmates gamb'g house 5,603 4,336 3,803 1,954 1,713 Bohemian. ... 1,103

885 992 840 Inmates opium den.. 281 232 146 181 223 Canadian ... 554 479 479 642

754

Impersonating officer. 52 44 22 Chinese 1,022 841 317

99 Keeping a disorderly Danish 312 264 253 271 315

house ................ 649428340 379 326 English

646

538 * 541 654 615 Keeping gaming house 1,258 850 796 184 525 French 233 303 229 236

290

Resisting off cer....... 833 626 528 734 684 German

5,119 4,277 4,487 5,295 5,069 Street walkers......... 2,437 Greek

1.156 1,108 1,135 1,201 836 Vagrancy ............. 379 361 68 631 581 Hollander

94 105 126 133 149 Other violations city Italian

1,715 1,551 1,488 1,714 1,116 ordinances .......... 7,219, 8,143 7,216 9,942 Irish

2,948

2,650 2,673 3,166 3,157 Norwegian 634 460 507 583 635

91,554 82,572 79,026 77,763 70,314 Polish . 4,251 3,263 3,394 3,903 3,420

*Not separately classified. Russian

2,450 1.924 1,689 1,905 1.842 AMBULANCE-WAGON SERVICE (1906). Swedish 1,431 1,218 1,200 1,278 1,052

Alarms responded to......
Scotch
.... 280 256 276

437
Arrests made..

... 716 Swiss .... 91 54 69 72 Fires attended..............

62 Others .... .... 1,628 994 637 668

Miles traveled.......

66,765 Total

7.202 Sick and injured taken to hospita .78,392 68,622 66,344 77,763 70,314 .........

Sick and injured taken home.

... 1,108 DISPOSITION OF CASES IN POLICE COURTS. Sick and injured taken to station.

188 Dead taken to morgue......

135 Males. Females. Total. Dead taken to residence..... Held to grand jury................ 3,218 220 3,438 Insane persons cared for...... Held to juvenile court............ 1,889172 2,061 Destitute persons cared for....... Fined .............

...19,300 3,398 22698 Prisoners taken to jail........... Discharged ...

..53, 110 6,596 59,706 | Children taken to Foundlings' home Released on peace bonds......... 1,063 252 1,315 Children taken to county agent...... Otherwise disposed of............ 192 20 212 Miscellaneous runs............................"

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MISCELLANEOUS DUTIES PERFORMED. Defective sidewalks reported...

.. 1.903 Lost children restored....... 896 Broken street lamps reported......

... 105 Accidents reported..... ...12,060 Unlighted street lamps reported.....

... 2,815 Defective hydrants reported......

253

Nuisances and dead animals reported. ....10,555 Defective water pipes reported....

... 2,773 Violations building ordinances reported........ 93 Defective sewers reported.

113
SUMMARY OF POLICE WORK BY YEARS.
No. officers
Fines Property

Miscellaneous Total Year.

and men. Arrests. imposed. recovered. Salaries. expenditures. expenditures. 1886..

1,032 44,261 $202,036.00 $149,988.52 $1,084,259.25 $108,510.31 $1,192,769.56 1887....

1,145 46,505 259, 249.00 168,023.03 1,199,022.28 106,539.79 1,305,562.07 1888.....

1,255 50,432 305,176.00 193,141.67 1,297.379.20 177.756.12 1,475, 135.32 1889....

1,624 48,119 275,925.00 206,822.12 1,432,189.25 170,405.35 1,602,594.60 1890.

1,900 62,230 363,938.00 228,885.73 2,066,308.92 133,818.04 2,200.126.96 1891

2,306 70,550 464,850.02 309,585.45 2,485,981.24 136.067.21 2,622,048.45 1892....

2,726 89,833 615,822.10 319,305.00 2,822, 220.27 212,823.65 3,035,043.92 1893....

3,189 96,676 523,359.00 294,129.83 3,287,530.84 263,026.86 3,550,557.70 1894...

3,188 88,323 452,340.00 392,082.14 3,433,129.30 210,806.87 3,643,936.17 1895

2,850 83,464 301,555.00 360,358.82 3,253,195.20 166,619.60 3,419,814.80 1896....

3,033 96,847 300,319.00 429,882.00 3,150,569.19 153,839.58 3,304, 408.77

3,551 83,680 216,284.00 390,628.89 3, 290, 419.66 167, 163.69 3,457,583.35 1898......

3,594 77,441 212,056.00 372,934.73 3,281,092,08 160,777.77 3,441,869.85 1899.....

3,267 71,349 203,687.00 339,914.59 3,257,256.17 181,318.28 3,438,574.45 1900.

3,314 70,438 219,902.00 414,181.37 3,230,627.63 154,532.41 3,385,160.04 1901.....

2,782 69,440 258,060.00 381,654.45 3,260, 608.80 148,398.15 3,409, 006.95 1902.

2,732 70,314 245,440.00 436,792.73 3,179,948.96 158,833.67 3,338, 782.63 1903.

2,773 77.763 330,026.00 392,181.63 3,420,079.92 149,397.85 3,569, 477.77 1904..

2,676 79,026 393,003.00 298,696.07 3,363,059.47 182,882.36 3,545,941.83 1905.....

2.590 82,572 440,021.00 382,159.61 3,551,447.60 409,826.87 3,961,274.47 1906...

3,578 91,471 527,450.00 545, 043.35 3,796,430.94 274,771.42 4,071,202.36

1897.

LEGAL FARES FOR CABS AND CARRIAGES.

........$0.50

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ONE-HORSE VEHICLES. 1. For one or two passengers, not exceeding

one mile....... 2. For each additional passenger, 25 cents for

the first mile or part thereof only.......... 3. For one or more passengers for the second mile and subsequent miles or part thereof, 25 cents for all for each such mile or part

thereof ........................................... 4. For children between 5 and 14 years of

age, when accompanied by an adult, not more than half of the above rates shall be charged for like distances. For children under 5 years of age, when accompanied by an adult, no charge shall be made. 5. For the use of any vehicle mentioned in this

section conveying one or more passengers, when hired by the hour with the privilege of going from place to place and stopping

as often as may be required, as follows: For the first hour...............

.......1.00 For each additional hour or part thereof at the

rate of $1 an hour.
6. In the case of any vehicle described in this

section being engaged by the hour and dis-
charged at a distance from the place where
it was engaged, the driver shall have the
right to charge for the time necessary to re- .
turn to such place.

TWO-HORSE VEHICLES.
1. For one or two passengers not exceeding

one m ile.......................................... 1.00 2. For each additional passenger 50 cents each

for the first mile or part thereof only....... . 3. For one or more passengers for the second

mile and subsequent miles or parts thereof.

50 cents for all for each mile or part thereof.50 4. Children between 5 and 14 years of age,

when accompanied by an adult, not more than

half of the above rates shall be charged for like distances. For children under 5 years of age, when accompanied by an adult, no

charge shall be made. 5. For the use of any vehicle mentioned in this

section conveying one or more passengers, when hired by the hour with the privilege of going from place to place and stopping

as often as may be required, as follows: For the first hour................................. 2.00 For each additional hour or part thereof, at

the rate of $1.50 an hour. 6. In the case of any vehicle described in this

section being engaged by the hour and discharged at a distance from the place where it was engaged, the driver shall have the right to charge for the time necessary to go back to such place. Notification to Driver-Passengers must notify the

driver when starting if they desire to use the vehicle by the hour; otherwise the driver may

assume that he is hired by the mile. Detention-For any detention exceeding 15 minutes

when working by the mile the driver may demand at the rate of $1 per hour. Baggage-Every passenger upon any vehicle li

censed under the provisions of this article shall be allowed to have conveyed with him upon such vehicle without charge therefor his ordinary light traveling baggage in an amount not to ex. ceed in weight seventy-five pounds. This in

cludes one and two horse . vehicles. Lost Baggage-Whenever any package, article or

baggage, or goods of any kind shall be left in or upon any vehicle licensed under the provisions of this article, the driver of such vehicle shall upon discovering such article or goods forth with deliver the same to the board of inspectors of passenger vehicles.

MONUMENTS IN CHICAGO."

In Lincoln Park-Andersen, Beethoven, Franklin, | In McKinley Park-McKinley.
Garibaldi, Goethe, Grant, La Salle, Lincoln, Linne, I Foot of 35th Street-Douglas.
Schiller, Shakespeare, Signal of Peace, The Calumet and 18th-Fort Dearborn massacre.
Alarm, Kennison.

Grand Boulevard and 51st Street-Washington. In Humboldt Park-Humboldt, Leif Ericson, Reu

FOUNTAINS. ter, Kosciusko.

Drake-LaSalle, near Washington.
In Union Park-Haymarket, Carter H. Harrison. Drexel--Drexel boulevard, near 51st.
In Garfield Park-Victoria, Burns.

Electric-Lincoln park.
In Lake Front Park-Logan,

Rosenberg-Lake Front park, south end.

el

toma

t, Leif Ericson, Rene

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