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The Congress of the united states shall have power to adjourn to any time within the year, and to any place within the united states, so that no period of adjournment be for a longer duration than the space of six months, and shall publish the Journal of their proceedings monthly, except such parts thereof relating to treaties, alliances or military operations, as in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the delegates of each state on any question shall be entered on the Journal, when it is desired by any delegate; and the delegates of a state, or any of them, at his or their request shall be furnished with a transcript of the said Journal, except such parts as are above excepted, to lay before the legislatures of the several states.

ARTICLE X. The committee of the states, or any nine of them, shall be authorized to execute, in the recess of congress, such of the powers of congress as the united states in congress assembled, by the consent of nine states, shall from time to time think expedient to vest them with; provided that no power be delegated to the said committee, for the exercise of which, by the articles of confederation, the voice of nine states in the congress of the united states assembled is requisite.

ARTICLE XI. Canada acceding to this confederation, and joining in the measures of the united states, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this union; but no other colony shall be adınitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine states.

ARTICLE XII. All bills of credit emitted, monies borrowed and debts contracted by, or under the authority of congress, before the assembling of the united states, in pursuance of the present confederation, shall be deemed and considered as a charge against the united states, for payment and satisfaction whereof the said united states, and the public faith are hereby solemnly pledged.

ARTICLE XIII. Every state shall abide by the determinations of the united states in congress assembled, on all questions which by this confederation is submitted to them. And the Articles of this confederation shall be inviolably observed by every state, and the union shall be perpetual; nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them ; unless such alteration be agreed to in a congress of the united states, and he afterwards confirmed by the legislatures of every state.

And Whereas it hath pleased the Great Governor of the

World to incline the hearts of the legislatures we respectively
represent in congress, to approve of, and to authorize us to ratify
the said articles of confederation and perpetual union. Know
Ye that we the undersigned delegates, by virtue of the power
and authority to us given for that purpose, do by these presents,
in the name and in behalf of our respective constituents, fully
and entirely ratify and confirm each and every of the said articles
of confederation and perpetual union, and all and singular the
matters and things therein contained : And we do furthur so-
lemnly plight and engage the faith of our respective constituents,
that they shall abide by the determinations of the united states
in congress assembled, on all questions, which by the said con-
federation are submitted to them. And that the articles thereof
shall be inviolably observed by the states we respectively repre-
sent, and that the union shall be perpetual. In witness whereof
we have hereunto set our hands in Congress. Done at, Philadel.
phia in the state of Pennsylvania the 9th day of July in the
Year of our Lord, 1778, and in the 3d year of the Independence
of America.
Josiah Bartlett,

John Wentworth, jun. On the part and behalf of the state
August 8th, 177

of New Hampshire. John Hancock,

Francis Dana,

the part and behalf of the stata Samuel Adams, James Lovell,

of Massachusetts Bay. Elbridge Gerry,

Samuel Holton, William Ellery,

John Collins,

On the part and behalf of the state

of Rhode Island and Providence Henry Marchant,

Plantations. Roger Sherman,

Titus Hosmer, Samuel Huntington,

he part and behalf of the state Andrew Adam,

of Connecticut. Oliver. Wolcott, Jas Duane,

William Duer, On the part and behalf of the state Fras Lewis, Gouve Morris,

of New York.

On the part and behalf of the state Jn' Witherspoon,

Natbl Scudder,

of New Jersey, November 26th

1778. Robt Morris,

William Clingan, Daniel Roberdeau,

Joseph Reed,

the part and bebalf of the state Jono Bayard Smith, 22 July, 1778.

of Pennsylvania. Tho. M*Kean, Feb. 12, 1779, Nicholas Van Dyke, on the part and bebalf of the state Joon Dickinson, May 5, 1779,

of Delaware. John Hanson,

Daniel Carroll,

On the part and behalf of the state March 1st, 1781, March 1st, 1781,

of Maryland. Richard Henry Lee,

Jno Harvie, John Banister,

Francis Lightfoot Lee,

on the part and bebalf of the state Thomas Adams,

of Virginia. John Penn,

Corns Harnett,

the part and behalf of the state July 21st, 1778, Jno Williams,

of North-Carolina. Henry Laurens, Richd Hutson,

he part and bebalf of the stato William Henry Drayton, Thos. Heyward,

of South-Carolina. Jno Matthews, Jpo Walton,

Edwd Telfair,

the part and behalf of the stata 24th July, 1778, Edwd Langworthy

of Georgia.

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FAREWELL ADDRESS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, PRESIDENT,

TO THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, SEPTEMBER 17, 1796.

Friends and Fellow-citizens :

The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the Executive Government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprize you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made.

I beg you, at the same time, to do me the justice to be assured that this resolution has not been taken without a strict regard to all the considerations appertaining to the relation 'wbich binds a dutiful citizen to his country; and that, in withdrawing the tender of service, which silence, in my situation, might imply, I am influenced by no diminution of zeal for your future interest; no deficiency of grateful respect for your past kindness; but am supported by a full conviction that the step is compatible with both.

The acceptance of, and continuance hitherto in, the office to which your suffrages have twice called me, have been a uniform sacrifice of inclination to the opinion of duty, and to a deference for what appeared to be your desire. I constantly hoped that it would have been much earlier in my power, consistently with motives which I was not at liberty to disregard, to return to that retireinent from which I had been reluctantly drawn. The strength of my inclination to do this, previous to the last election, bad even led to the preparation of an address to declare it to you; but mature reflection on the then perplexed and critical posture of our affairs with foreign nations, and the unanimous advice of persons entitled to my confidence, impelled me to abandon the idea.

I rejoice that the state of your concerns, external as well as internal, no longer renders the pursuit of inclination incompatible with the sentiment of duty or propriety; and am. persuaded, whatever partiality may be retained for my services, that, in the present circumstances of our country, you will not disapprove my determination to retire.

The impressions with which I undertook the arduous trust were explained on the proper occasion. In the discharge of this trust, I will only say, that I have with good intentions contri. buted towards the organization and administration of the Government the best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable. Not unconscious in the outset of the inferiority of my qualifications, experience, in my own eyes—perhaps still more in the ey«:s of others—has strengthened the motives to diffidence of myself; and every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me, more and more, that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome. Satisfied that if any cir. cumstances have given peculiar value to my services, they were temporary, I have the consolation to believe that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.

In looking forward to the moment which is intended to termi. nate the career of my public life, my feelings do not permit me to suspend the deep acknowledgment of that debt of gratitude which I owe to my beloved country for the many honors it has conferred upon me; still more for the steadfast confidence witb which it has supported me; and for the opportunities I have thence enjoyed of manifesting my inviolable attachment, by services faithful and persevering, though in usefulness unequal to my zeal. If benefits have resulted to our country from these services, let it always be remembered to your praige, and as an instructive example in our annals, that, under circumstances in which the passions, agitated in every direction, were liable to mis. lead; amidst appearances sometimes dubious, vicissitudes of fortune often discouraging; in situations in which, not unfrequently, want of success has countenanced the spirit of criticism,-the constancy of your support was the essential prop of the efforts, and a guarantee of the plans, by which they were effected. Profoundly penetrated with this idea, I shall carry it with me to my grave, as a strong incitement to unceasing vows, that Heaven may continue to you the choicest tokens of its beneficence; that our union and brotherly affection may be perpetual ; that the de Constitution, which is the work of your hands, may be sacredly maintained; that its administration, in every department, may be stamped with wisdom and virtue; that, in fine, the happiness of the people of these States, under the auspices of liberty, may be made complete, by so careful a preservation and so prudent a use of this blessing as will acquire to them the glory of recommending it to the applause, the affection, and the adoption of every nation which is yet a stranger to it.

Here, perhaps, I ought to stop; but a solicitude for your wel. fare, which cannot end but with my life, and the apprehension of danger natural to that solicitude, urge me, on an occasion like the present, to offer to your solemn contemplation, and to recommend to your frequent review, some sentiments, which are the result of much reflection, of no inconsiderable observation, and which appear to me all-important to the permanency of your felicity as a people. These will be afforded to you with the more freedom, as you can only see in them the disinterested warnings of a parting friend, who can possibly have no personal motive to bias his counsel; nor can I forget, as an encouragement to it, your indulgent reception of my sentiments on a former and not dissimilar occasion.

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.

The unity of government, which constitutes you one people, is also now dear to you. It is justly so; for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence—the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, -it is if infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can, in any event, be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of vur

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