Essays of Benjamin Franklin: Moral, Social and Scientific

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The Minerva Group, Inc., 2001 - 188 páginas

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Contenido

XVIII
63
Aurora Borealis
70
An Economical Project
77
To Edward Nairne of London
84
To John Ingenhousz
91
An Account of Toads Found Enclosed in Solid Stone
103
To LAbbe Soulavie
106
Propositions Relative to Privateering Communicated to Mr Oswald
112
To Sir Joseph Banks
117
Meteorological Imaginations and Conjectures
121
To David Rittenhouse
125
To David Le Roy
129
To James Bowdoin
177
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Acerca del autor (2001)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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