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AUTHOR or “THE GRAPE CULTURIst,” “PRACTICAL For Estry,” “PROPAeATION
OF PLANTS,” ETC., ETC.

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Rntered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1887, by the
O. JUDD CO.,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

PRINTED IN U. S. A.

PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION AND
APPENDIX.

Twenty years ago I wrote the first edition of this work, scarcely expecting at the time that there would be such a demand for it as to call for various revisions and additions during the next two decades, and even later, for now my publishers inform me that the last edition is entirely exhausted, and a new one must immediately go to press to enable them to promptly fill their orders. The large number of copies sold of former editions has not only been gratifying to the Author, but it has shown that there was a want of just such information as it contained. It was a pioneer in a new field, and Small Fruit Culture as a distinct branch of horticulture had never been recognized when the first edition of this work was published, but now there are hundreds of establishments, and in all parts of the country, in which the small fruits or berries are a specialty. That this work has had some influence in promoting this advance in Small Fruit Culture, the Author thinks he may claim, without fear of being accused of conceit.

That my efforts in seeking to disseminate information in regard to the propagation and cultivation of berries have been well received by my co-laborers in this field, is shown by the large sale and constant demand for this work, and that they have also been appreciated abroad is

IV PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION AND APPENDIX.

indicated by the fact that it has been translated into German, and a very handsome edition brought out by a publisher at Weimar. As this is the first and only book written by an American on horticulture, which has been translated and published in Germany, I consider that it is not only a compliment to the Author, but to American horticulturists generally.

As I have already stated in former editions of this work, my principal object in experimenting with small fruits was to obtain information, which might be given to the public with an assurance that it would encourage their cultivation, and eventually make them so plentiful and cheap that the poor, as well as the rich, of our large cities and villages might be able to indulge in fruits, which had long been considered as luxuries.

That the good work may go forward until every garden shall yield an abundance of the largest and best varieties, and every table in the land be constantly supplied, is the sincere wish of

THE Author.

Ridgewood, N. J., March, 1887.

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