Moral Views of Commerce, Society, and Politics: In Twelve Discourses

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D. Felt, 1838 - 300 páginas
 

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Página 63 - Two things have I required of thee; deny me them not before I die : Remove far from me vanity and lies : give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me : lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord 1 or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
Página 96 - Unspeakably touching is it, however, when I find both dignities united; and he that must toil outwardly for the lowest of man's wants, is also toiling inwardly for the highest. Sublimer in this world know I nothing than a Peasant Saint, could such now anywhere be met with. Such a one will take thee back to Nazareth itself; thou wilt see the splendor of Heaven spring forth from the humblest depths of Earth, like a light shining in great darkness.
Página 70 - HEAR, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: For the Lord hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, And they have rebelled against me. The ox knoweth his owner, And the ass his master's crib: But Israel doth not know, My people doth not consider.
Página 152 - A POOR Relation — is the most irrelevant thing in nature, — a piece of impertinent correspondency, — an odious approximation, — a haunting conscience, — a preposterous shadow, lengthening in the noontide of your prosperity, — an unwelcome remembrancer, — a perpetually recurring mortification, — a drain on your purse, — a more intolerable dun upon your pride, — a drawback upon success, — a rebuke to your rising, — a stain in your blood, — a blot on your scutcheon, — a rent...
Página 95 - Two men I honour, and no third. First, the toilworn Craftsman that with earth-made Implement laboriously conquers the earth, and makes her man's. Venerable to me is the hard Hand; crooked, coarse; wherein notwithstanding lies a cunning virtue indefeasibly royal, as of the Sceptre of this Planet.
Página 96 - ... us were thy straight limbs and fingers so deformed: thou wert our Conscript, on whom the lot fell, and fighting our battles wert so marred. For in thee too lay a godcreated Form but it was not to be unfolded; encrusted must it stand with the thick adhesions and defacements of Labour: and thy body, like thy soul, was not to know freedom. Yet toil on, toil on: thou art in thy duty, be out of it who may; thou toilest for the altogether indispensable, for daily bread.
Página 65 - Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you. Your riches are corrupted, and your garments are motheaten. Your gold and silver is cankered; and the rust of them shall be a witness against you, and shall eat your flesh as it were fire. Ye have heaped treasure together for the Last Days.
Página 34 - Cicero, of a corn merchant of Alexandria, arriving at Rhodes in a time of great scarcity, with a cargo of grain, and with knowledge that a number of other vessels with similar cargoes had already sailed from Alexandria, and which he had passed on his voyage.
Página 96 - Highest of all when his outward and his inward endeavour are one when we can name him Artist; not earthly craftsman only, but inspired Thinker, who with heaven-made implement conquers Heaven for us!
Página 96 - ... with heaven-made implement conquers heaven for us ! If the poor and humble toil that we have food, must not the high and glorious toil for him, in return, that he have light and guidance, freedom, immortality ? — these two, in all their degrees, I honor; all else is chaff and dust, which let the wind blow whither it listeth.

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