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mains being determined upon before the work the Executive, from much needless persecution, was commenced, thus securing permanency when and will prove of great value to the public at completed. I question whether so much has large. ever been accomplished before in any American I would recommend for your favorable considcity for the same expenditures. The Govern-eration the passage of an enabling act for the ment having large reservations in the city, and admission of Colorado as a State in the Union. the nation at large having an interest in their It possesses all the elements of a prosperous capital, I recommend a liberal policy toward the State, agricultural and mineral, and, 'I believe, District of Columbia, and that the Government has a population now to justify such admission. should bear its just share of the expense of these In connection with this I would also recommend improvements. Every citizen visiting the capi. the encouragement of a canal for purposes of tal feels a pride in its growing beauty, and that irrigation from the eastern slope of the Rocky he, too, is part owner in the investments made Mountains to the Missouri river. As a rule, I am here.

opposed to further donations of public lands for I would suggest to Congress the propriety of internal improvements, owned and controlled by promoting the establishment in this District of private corporations, but in this instance I would an institution of learning, or university of the make an exception. Between the Missouri river highest class, by the donation of lands. There and the Rocky Mountains there is an arid belt is no place better suited for such an institution of public land from three hundred to five hunthan the national capital. There is no other dred miles in width, perfectly valueless for the place in which every citizen is so directly inter occupation of man, for the want of sufficient rain ested.

to secure the growth of any product. An irriIn three successive messages to Congress I gating canal would make productive a belt, as have called attention to the subject of "civil wide as the supply of water could be made to service reform.”

spread over, across this entire country, and would Action has been taken so far as to authorize secure a cordon of settlements, connecting the the appointment of a board to devise rules govo present population of the mountain and mining erning methods of making appointments and regions with that of the older States. All the promotions, but there never has been any action land reclaimed would be clear gain. If alternate making these rules, or any rules, binding, or sections are retained by the Government, I would even entitled to observance where persons desire suggest that the retained sections be thrown open the appointment of a friend, or the removal of to entry under the homestead laws, or sold to an official who may be disagreeable to them. actual settlers for a very low price.

To have any rules effective they must have I renew my previous recommendation to Conthe acquiescence of Congress as well as of the gress for general amnesty. The number engaged Executive. I commend, therefore, the subject in the late rebellion yet laboring under disabilito your attention, and suggest that a special ties is very small, but enough to keep up a concommittee of Congress might confer with the stant irritation. No possible danger can accrue civil service board during the present session for to the Government by restoring them to eligithe purpose of devising such rules as can be bility to hold office. maintained, and which will secure the services I suggest for your consideration the enactment of honest and capable officials, and which will of a law to better secure the civil rights which also protect them in a degree of independence freedom should secure, but has not effectually while in office.

secured, to the enfranchised slave. Proper rules will protect Congress, as well as

U. S. GRANT.

IX. PROCLAMATIONS AND ORDERS OF PRESIDENT GRANT.

Order Respecting Wages of Labor, chanics on account of such reduction of the hours May 11, 1872.

of labor;

And whereas it is now represented to me that Whereas the act of Congress approved June the act of Congress and the proclamation afore25, 1868, constituted, on and after that date, said have not been strictly observed by all offieight hours a day's work for all laborers, work, cers of the Government having charge of such men, and mechanics employed by or on behalf of laborers, workmen, and mechanics : the Government of the United States;

Now, therefore, Í, Ulysses S. Grant, President And whereas on the nineteenth day of May, in of the United States, do hereby again call attenthe year one thousand eight hundred and sixty- tion to the act of Congress aforesaid, and direct nine, by executive proclamation, it was directed all officers of the Executive department of the that from and after that date no reduction should Government having charge of the employment be made in the wages paid by the Government and payment of laborers, workmen, or mechanby the day to such laborers, workmen, and me- lics employed by or on behalf of the Government of the United States to make no reduction in the authority vested in me by an act of Congress of wages paid by the Government by the day to the twenty-fourth day of May, one thousand such laborers, workmen, and mechanics on ac- eight hundred and twenty-eight, do hereby decount of the reduction of the hours of labor. clare and proclaim that, from and after the said

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my second instant, so long as vessels of the United hand, and caused the seal of the United States to States and their cargoes shall be exempt from be affixed.

discriminating duties as aforesaid, any such Done at the city of Washington this eleventh duties on Japanese vessels entering the ports of day of May, in the year of our Lord one thou- the United States, or on the produce, manu

nr sand eight hundred and seventy-two, factures, or merchandise imported in such ves LOPAM.) and of the independence of the United sels, shall be discontinued and abolished. States the ninety-sixth.

In testimony whereof, I have here to set my By the President:

U. S. Grant. hand and caused the seal of the United States to Hamilton Fisi, Secretary of State.

be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington, the fourth

day of September, in the year of our Proclamation as to Ships and Vessels

Lord one thousand eight hundred and of Sweden and Norway, May 11, 1872. (SEAL.]

seventy-two, and of the Independence Whereas, pursuant to the first section of the

of the United States the ninety-seventh. act of Congress approved the eleventh day of

U. S. GRANT. June, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, By the President: entitled "An act to provide for the execution of CHARLES HALE, Acting Secretary of State. treaties between the United States and foreign nations respecting consular jurisdiction over the

Proclamation respecting Discrimin. crews of vessels of such foreign nations in the waters and ports of the United States," it is pro

ating Duties on French Vessels,

October 30, 1872. vided that before that act shall take effect as to the ships and vessels of any particular nation Whereas, upon information received by me having such treaty with the United States, the from His Majesty the Emperor of the French, President of the United States shall have been that discriminating duties before the date of satisfied that similar provisions have been made said information levied in French ports upon for the execution of such treaty by the other con- merchandise imported from the countries of its tracting party, and shall have issued his procla- origin in vessels of the United States were dismation to that effect, declaring that act to be in continued and abolished, and in pursuance of force as to such nation;

the provisions of an act of Congress of the 7th And whereas due inquiry having been made, of January, 1824, and of an act in addition and a satisfactory answer having been received thereto of the 24th of May, 1828, I did, on the that similar provisions are in force in the United 12th day of June, 1869,* issue my proclamation Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway:

declaring that the discriminating duties before Now, therefore, be it known that I, Ulysses S. that date levied upon merchandise imported Grant, President of the United States of America, from the countries of its origin into ports of the do hereby proclaim the same accordingly. United States in French vessels were thereby

Done at the city of Washington this eleventh | discontinued and abolished; day of May, in the year of our Lord one thou. And whereas, upon information subsequently

sand eight hundred and seventy-two, received by me that the levying of such duties (SEAL.)S [SPAL.) and of the independence of the United on all merchandise imported into France in

States of America the ninety-sixth. vessels of the United States, whether from the By the President:

U.S. GRANT. country of its origin or from other countries, HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State.

had been discontinued, I did, on the 20th of

November, 1869, in pursuance of the provisions Proclamation respecting Discrimin

of the said acts of Congress, and by the authority ating Duties on Japanese Vessels,

e Vessels in me vested thereby, issue my proclamation September 4, 1872.

declaring that the discriminating duties before

that date levied upon merchandise imported into Whereas satisfactory information has been re- the United States in French vessels, either from ceived by me from His Majesty the Emperor of the countries of its origin or from any other Japan, through an official communication of Mr. country, were thereby discontinued and abolArinori Mori, His Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires, ished: under date of the second instant, that no other And whereas, by the provisions of the said or higher duties of tonnage or impost are im- acts of Congress of January 7th, 1824, and of posed or levied in the ports of the Empire of the 24th of May, 1828, as well as by the terms Japan, upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the said proclamations of the 12th of June, of the United States, or upon the produce, manu- 1869, and of the 20th of November, 1869, the factures, or merchandise imported in the same said suspension of discriminating duties upon from the United States, or from any foreign merchandise imported into the United States in country, than are levied on Japanese ships and French vessels was granted by the United States their cargoes in the same ports under like cir- l on condition that, and to continue so long as cumstances :

Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President * For this proclamation, see McPherson's History of of the United States of America, by virtue of the l Reconstruction. p, 421.

merchandise imported into France in vessels of the President of the United States that many the United States should be admitted into the persons holding civil office by appointment from ports of France on the same terms of exemption him, or otherwise, under the Constitution and from the payment of such discriminating du- laws of the United States, while holding such ties;

federal positions accept offices under the authorAnd whereas information has been received ity of the States and Territories in which they by me that, by a law of the French Republic, reside. or of municipal corporations, under the passed on the 30th of January, 1872, and pub- charters and ordinances of such corporations, lished on the 3d of February, 1872, merchandise thereby assuming the duties of the State, Terriimported into France in vessels of the United torial, or municipal office at the same time that States, from countries other than the United they are charged with the duties of the civil States, is (with the exception of certain articles office held under federal authority: enumerated in said law) subjected to discrim- And whereas it is believe that, with but few inating duties;

exceptions, the holding of two such offices by the And whereas, by the operation of said law of same person is incompatible with a due and faiththe French Republic of the 30th of Japuary, ful discharge of the duties of either office ; that 1872, the exemption of French vessels and their it frequently gives rise to great inconvenience, cargoes granted by the terms of the said procla- and often results in detriment to the public sermations of the 12th of June, 1869, and of the vice; and, moreover, is not in harmony with the 20th of November, 1869, in accordance with the genius of the Government; provisions of the acts of Congress aforesaid, has 1 In view of the premises, therefore, the Presiceased to be reciprocal on the part of France dent has deemed it proper thus and hereby to towards vessels owned by citizens of the United give public notice that, from and after the 4th States and their cargoes:

day of March, A. D. 1873, (except as herein Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President specified,) persons holding any federal civil office of the United States of America, by virtue of the by appointment under the Constitution and laws authority vested in me by an act of Congress of of the United States will be expected, while holdthe seventh day of January, one thousand eighting such office, not to accept or hold any office hundred and twenty-four, and by an act in ad- under any State or Territorial government, or dition thereto of the twenty-fourth day of May, under the charter or ordinances of any munione thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, cipal corporation ; and further, that the acceptdo hereby declare and proclaim that on and after ance or continued holding of any such State, this date the said suspension of the collection of Territorial, or municipal office, whether elective discriminating duties upon merchandise imported or by appointment, by any person holding civil into the United States in French vessels from office, as aforesaid, under the Government of the countries other than France, provided for by my United States, other than judicial offices under said proclamations of the twelfth day of June, the Constitution of the United States, will be one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, and deemed a vacation of the federal office held by the twentieth day of November, one thousand such person, and will be taken to be, and will be eight hundred and sixty-nine, shall cease and treated as, a resignation by such federal officer determine, and all the provisions of the acts im- of his commission or appointment in the service posing discriminating foreign tonnage and im- of the United States. port duties in the United States are hereby re- The offices of justices of the peace, of notaries vived, and shall henceforth be and remain in public, and of commissioners to take the acfull force, as relates to goods and merchandise knowledgement of deeds, of bail, or to administer imported into the United States in French ves- oaths, shall not be deemed within the purview of sels from countries other than France, so long as this order, and are excepted from its operation, any discriminating duties shall continue to be and may be held by federal officers. imposed by France upon goods and merchandise The appointment of deputy marshal of the imported into France in vessels of the United United States may be conferred upon sheriffs States from countries other than the United or deputy sheriffs. And deputy postmasters, the States.

emoluments of whose office do not exceed six In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hundred dollars per annum, are also excepted hand and caused the seal of the United States from the operations of this order, and may ac to be affixed.

cept and hold appointments under State, TerriDone at the city of Washington this thirtieth torial, or municipal authority, provided the same

day of October, in the year of our be found not to interfere with the discharge of

Lord one thousand eight hundred and their duties as postmasters. Heads of DepartLSPAS seventy-two, and of the Independence ments and other officers of the Government who of the United States the ninety-seventh. have the appointment of subordinate officers are

U. S. GRANT. required to take notice of this order, and to see By the President:

to the enforcement of its provisions and terms HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State. within the sphere of their respective depart

ments or offices, and as relates to the several Executive order prohibiting certain

persons holding appointments under them, re United States officers from holding spectively. office under any State or Territorial! By order of the PRESIDENT : Government, January 17, 1873.

Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State. Whereas it has been brought to the notice of WASHINGTON, January 17, 1873.

Letter of the Secretary of State ex- | within the intent of the executive order, and

planatory of the above Executive may be performed by federal officers, provided it Order, January 28, 1873.

does not interfere with the regular and efficient dis

charge of the duties of the federal office, of which DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

the head of the department under which the office WASHINGTON, January 28, 1873. is held will, in each case, be the judge. EmployInquiries having been made from various ment by the day as mechanics or laborers in the quarters as to the application of the executive armories, arsenals, navy yards, &c., does not order, issued on the 17th January, relating to constitute an office of any kind, and those thus the holding of State or municipal offices by per-employed are not within the contemplation of sons holding civil offices under the Federal Gov- the executive order. Master-workmen, and ernment, the President directs the following re others who hold appointments from the Goveraply to be made:

ment, or from any department, whether for a It has been asked whether the order probibits fixed time or at the pleasure of the appointing a federal officer from holding also the office of an power, are embraced within the operation of the alderman or of a common councilman in a city, order. or of a town councilman of a town or village, or By order of the President: of appointments under city, town, or village

HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of States governments. By some it has been suggested that there may be distinction made in case the office be with or without salary or compensation. Proclamation requiring certain disorThe city or town offices of the description referred derly persons in Louisiana to disto, by whatever names they may be locally! perse, May 22, 1873. known, whether held by election or by appointment, and whether with or without salary or Whereas, under the pretence that William P. compensation, are of the class which the execu. Kellogg, the present executive of Louisiana, and tive order intends not to be held by persons the officers associated with him in the State adholding federal offices.

ministration, were not duly elected, certain turIt has been asked whether the order prohibits bulent and disorderly persons have combined federal officers from holding positions on boards together with force and arms to resist the laws of education, school committees, public libraries, and constituted authorities of said State; and religious or eleemosynary institutions incorpo-1 Whereas it has been duly certified by the rated or established or sustained by State or mu- proper local authorities, and judicially deternicipal authority. Positions and service on such mined by the inferior and Supreme courts of boards or committees, and professorships in col. said State, that said officers are entitled to hold leges, are not regarded as “ offices" within the their offices respectively, and execute and discontemplation of the executive order, but as em- charge the functions thereof; and ployments or service in which all good citizens Whereas Congress, at its late session, upon a may be engaged without incompatibility, and in due consideration of the subject, tacitly recogmany cases without necessary interference with nized the said executive and his associates then, any position which they may hold under the as now, in office, by refusing to take any action Federal Government. Officers of the Federal with respect thereto; and Government may, therefore, engage in such ser- Whereas it is provided in the Constitution of vice, provided the attention required by such the United States that the United States shall employment does not interfere with the regu protect every State in this Union on application lar and efficient discharge of the duties of their of the Legislature, or of the executive when the office under the Federal Government. The head Legislature cannot be convened, against domestic of the department under whom the federal office violence; and is held will, in all cases, be the sole judge wheth- Whereas it is provided in the laws of the er or not the employment does thus interfere. United States, that in all cases of insurrection in

The question has also been asked with regard any State, or of obstruction to the laws thereof, to officers of the State militia. Congress having it shall be lawful for the President of the exercised the power conferred by the Constitu- 1 United States on application of the Legisla tion to provide for organizing the militia, which ture of such State, or of the executive when the is liable to be called forth to be employed in the Legislature cannot be convened, to call forth the service of the United States, and is thus, in militia of any other State or States, or to employ some sense, under the control of the General such part of the land and naval forces as shall Government, and is, moreover, of the greatest be judged necessary for the purpose of suppres value to the public, the executive order of 17th sing such insurrection or causing the laws to be January is not considered as prohibiting federal duly executed; and officers from being officers of the militia in the Whereas the Legislature of said State is not States and Territories.

now in session, and cannot be convened in time It has been asked whether the order prohibits to meet the present emergency, and the execupersons holding office under the Federal Govern- tive of said State, under section 4 of article IV ment being members of local or municipal fire of the Constitution of the United States, and departments; also, whether it applies to me. the laws passed in pursuance thereof, has, therechanics employed by the day in the armories, fore, made application to me for such part of the arsenals, and navy yards, &c., of the United military force of the United States as may be States. Unpaid service in local or municipal necessary and adequate to protect said State and fire departments is not regarded as an office the citizens thereof against domestic violence

and to enforce the due execution of the laws; United States and Her Britannic Majesty's Enand

voy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary Whereas it is required that whenever it may at Washington have recorded in a protocol a be necessary in the judgment of the President to conference held by them at the Department of use the military force for the purpose aforesaid, State in Washington, on the 7th day of June, he shall forthwith by proclamation command | 1873, in the following language: such insurgents to disperse and retire peaceably

"PROTOCOL to their respective homes within a limited time:

Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President “Of a conference held at Washington, on the sevof the United States, do hereby make proclama- enth day of June, one thousand eight hundred tion, and command said turbulent and disorderly! and seventy-three. persons to disperse and retire peaceably to their “Whereas it is provided by Article XXXIII respective abodes within twenty days from this of the treaty between her Majesty the Queen of date, and hereafter to submit themselves to the I the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Irelaws and constituted authorities of said State; l land, and the United States of America, signed and I invoke the aid and co-operation of all good at Washington on the 8th of May, 1871, as folcitizens thereof to uphold law and preserve the lows: public peace.

“ARTICLE XXXIII. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my band and caused the seal of the United States to “The foregoing Articles, XVIII to XXV, in. be affixed.

clusive, and Article XXX of this treaty shall Done at the city of Washington this twenty-take effect as soon as the laws required to carry

second day of May, in the year of our them into operation shall have been passed by

Lord eighteen hundred and seventy- the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, by the BEAL.) three, and of the independence of the Parliament of Canada, and by the Legislature of United States the ninety-seventh. Prince Edward's Island on the one hand, and

U. S. GRANT. by the Congress of the United States on the By the President:

other. Such assent having been given, the said J. C. BANCROFT DAVIS,

articles shall remain in force for the period of ten Acting Secretary of State. years from the date at which they may come

into operation, and further, until the expiration Proclamation announcing that the

of two years after either of the high contracting Government of Great Brtiain had par

cal parties shall have given notice to the other of given full effect to Articles 18th to

18th to its wish to terminate the same; each of the high 25th inclusive and Article 30th of

contracting parties being at liberty to give such the Treaty of Washington, July 1,

notice to the other at the end of the said period 1873.

of ten years, or at any time afterward;

"And whereas, in accordance with the stipuWhereas by the thirty-third article of a treaty lations of the above recited article, an act was concluded at Washington on the 8th day of May, passed by the Imperial Parliament of Great 1871, between the United States and her Britan- | Britain in the 35th and 36th years of the reign nic Majesty, it was provided that“Articles XVIII of Queen Victoria, intituled 'An act to carry into to XXV inclusive and Article XXX of this treaty effect, a treaty between Her Majesty and the chall take effect as soon as the laws required to United States of America;' carry them into operation shall have been passed “And whereas an act was passed by the Senby the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, by ate and House of Commons of Canada in the the Parliament of Canada, and by the Legisla- fifth session of the First Parliament, held in the ture of Prince Edward's Island on the one hand, thirty-fifth year of Her Majesty's reign, and asand by the Congress of the United States on the sented to in Her Majesty's name, by the Gov. other;"

ernor General, on the fourteenth day of June, And whereas by the first section of an act en- 1872, intituled 'An act relating to the treaty of titled "An act to carry into effect the provisions Washington, 1871; of the treaty between the United States and “And whereas an act was passed by the LegGreat Britain signed in the city of Washington islature of Prince Edward's Island and assented the eighth day of May, eighteen hundred and to by the Lieutenant Governor of that Colony on iseventy-one, relating to the fisheries," it is pro- the 29th day of June, 1872, intituled 'An act vided that whenever the President of the United relative to the treaty of Washington, 1871:' States shall receive satisfactory evidence that "And whereas an act was passed by the Senthe Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, the ate and House of Representatives of the United Parliament of Canada, and the Legislature of States of America in Congress assembled, and ap. Prince Edward's Island have passed laws on proved on the first day of March, 1873, by the their part to give full effect to the provisions of President of the United States, intituled 'An act the treaty between the United States and Great to carry into effect the provisions of the treaty Britain signed at the city of Washington on the between the United States and Great Britain eighth day of May, eighteen hundred and seventy- signed in the city of Washington the eighth day one, as contained in articles eighteenth to twenty of May, eighteen hundred and seventy-one, re fifth inclusive and article thirtieth of said treaty, lating to fisheries: he is hereby authorized to issue his proclamation “The undersigned, Hamilton Fish, Secretary declaring that he has such evidence;"

I of State of the United States, and the Right HonAnd whereas the Secretary of State of the orable Sir Edward Thornton, one of her Majesty's

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