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that all the firing was from the enemy, his Majesty's 12th regiment scarcely firing a shot the whole night. Near twelve, Colonel Wellesley came to my tent in a good deal of agitation, to say he had not carried the tope. It proved that the 33d, with which he attacked, got into confusion and could not be formed, which was a great pity, as it must be particularly unpleasant to him. Altogether, circumstances considered, we got off very well. General Baird's expedition of last night so far answered our expectations, as he fell in with a small party of the enemy's horse, and cut up eight or ten of them, which will tend to prevent their plaguing us with rockets, I trust. He missed his road coming back, although one would have thought it impossible ; no wonder night attacks so often fail.

" 6th April. Determined to make another attack on the tope, Lieut.-Colonel Bowser's and Halyburton's corps, with the Scotch brigade (supported by the 25th dragoons and 2d regiment native cavalry, on seeing the Sultan's cavalry appearing from the fort), were destined to assist in this service, and, with scarcely any opposition, carried it.

Sunday the 7th. Yesterday evening walked down to the advanced post with Baird and Macleod. Found it very strong against so contemptible an enemy as we have to deal with; and such as may, with a little trouble, be made very strong against any. How fortunate thus to find a good parallel prepared to our hands! The fort fired a great deal yesterday, with no other effect than furnishing shot to us. A long line of cavalry seen coming out of the fort about twelve ; reported at three, by Colonel Wellesley, to have come more round our right ; and that he has therefore ordered the battalions we spoke of when looking what they were about, on the road which leads to Periapatam. Our foraging party coming in fast ; but this cannot be their object, and they would move more rapidly than they have done. Great many of us much fatigued. Beatson, among the rest, very much relaxed and weak. Our duties pretty severe ; but if the whole is not pressed on with vigour we shall fail ; for no doubt there will be more difficulties to overcome than we yet forsee.

Monday, 8th. Visited the post taken possession of by Colonel Wellesley on the 6th instant. Found it a continuation of the nullah which makes Shawe's post, but not so favourable in that part for keeping hold of. Directed a burnt village, on a rise above the Nullah, to be made the right hand post, by barricading the streets and cutting down the walls to six feet, ickening them next the and putting a banquette within. Brisk cannonade from the fort. Colonel Close brought Dallas and Hart to speak about the bullock drivers, &c."

On the following day, General the river to the village of SultaunpetHarris directed three simultaneous tah. attacks to be made, with a view to We insert the following notes and drive the enemy from the whole line letters, because they afford evidence of his outposts. That on the Sultaun- of the general activity and vigilance pettah tope was again intrusted to displayed by Colonel Wellesley in the Colonel Wellesley. On this occasion discharge of his duty. They are init was completely successful. The teresting, too, as Colonel Gurwood other columns likewise succeeded in justly observes, from the illustration dislodging the enemy on the right they afford of the degree in which and left, and by these assaults Gene- even the details of the army he comral Harris was enabled to occupy a manded were conducted by General strong connected line, formed chiefly Harris :by the aqueduct, and extending from

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.- General Harris.

46 MY DEAR SIR,

Camp, 6th April, 1799. “ I find that by moving Malcolm's corps to the rear a little, and by an arrangement of my posts on my right and rear, I shall be able to protect Meer Allum, the brinjarries, the park, and the cavalry from any attempts that may be made by horse and rocket boys, which alone seem to me to be destined to annoy us in that quarter.

“ I shall now go out and see what support I can give to my post at Sultaunpettah, and will report to you on my return.

“I am, my dear Sir," &c.

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.- General Harris.

66

you

“ MY DEAR SIR,

Camp, 7th April, 1799. I shall be much obliged to you if you will let me know whether think the guards for the outposts can now be reduced a little, as between foraging parties and outline picquets we have not men enough left to give a relief. The outline picquets were not relieved this morning for want of men. You were talking yesterday of looking at these posts this afternoon, and if you have an inclination, I will go with you at any hour you may appoint. I think I can show you a situation where two embrasures might be opened in the bank of the Nullah with advantage, and that would add to the strength of the post.

I am, my dear Sir," &c.

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.-General Harris.

“ MY DEAR Sir,

3 P.M., 7th April, 1799. “ A body of horse, of about seven or eight hundred, has passed, and is getting round by my right and your rear. They keep clear of our picquets, and are most probably a reconnoitring party.

“ They have some few straggling footmen with them, but I have seen no infantry.

“ I am, my dear Sir,” &c.

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.-General Harris.

“ MY DEAR SIR,

Camp, 7th April, 1799. “ I have the pleasure to inform you, that the foragers are coming in fast, well loaded with forage, and I have therefore ordered the battalion to stay where it is, ready to turn out, but (as battalions are now scarce articles) not to move till further orders.

“ The body of cavalry has passed our right flank, and seems inclining rather to its left. It appears more like a line of march than a body intended for a coup de main, as there are with it bullocks and baggage of different kinds. At all events, it can do our right no harm, as, excepting by the highroad, which Malcolm's corps will cover as soon as it will have moved, no cavalry can approach us.

“ I am, my dear Sir, &c.

" I see the cavalry has come more round our right, and I have therefore ordered the battalion on to the high-road, whence it will afford protection to the foragers coming in, as well as to the rear of our camp, should they be inclined to molest it.'

6 Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.- General Harris.

up

66 MY DEAR SIR,

Camp, 7th April, 1799. “ I have drawn back the battalion, as the foragers are come in, and the cavalry have disappeared. As soon as Schoey's brigade will have taken its ground, we shall have four field-pieces, at least, bearing upon that road; when I shall have an opportunity of looking at it again. I will let you know whether they will be sufficient, and what will.

“ I have fourteen 6-pounders, of which eight are out of the lines at the outposts and picquets.

“ I am, my dear Sir," &c.

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.-General Harris.

“ MY DEAR SIR,

Camp, 7th April, 1799. • Since I returned home, I have received a report from the outposts in Sultaunpettah, that some infantry had passed this evening in the same direction in which the cavalry passed this morning ; and there are some persons in this camp who say they saw guns pass likewise.

“ I have not yet received a report from my picquets in my front; when I do, I will let you know what it is.

At all events, I am prepared for him, if his attack is directed against this flank of your line, whether it be made by day or by night. I do not intend to relieve the outposts until after it is ascertained whether or not he intends to make his push here : if he does attack us here, he will probably attack the outposts at the same time ; and, in that case, we must depend upon your line for the support of our posts.

“ I am, my dear Sir," &c.

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut. - Colonel Harris.

“ MY DEAR Sır,

Camp, 7th April, 1799. “ The field officer of the day was at the piequet in my front till sunset ; saw cavalry pass, but no infantry or guns.

“ I am, my dear Sir,” &c.

The operations of the siege were stances had come to the knowledge of pushed on with all practical expedi- Lord Wellesley, which made him detion. Seringapatam was not fortified cide on the utter subversion of the according to the principles of Euro- power of the Sultan. The sentence pean science, but there were bastions of deposition, therefore, had gone connected by lofty straight walls of forth against Tippoo and his dynasty, great strength and thickness. The and General Harris would listen to north-western angle was selected as no terms short of unconditional subthe chief point of attack. As the mission. The following letter will siege advanced, Tippoo made fresh show that Colonel Wellesley took his overtures to General Harris, but these full share of the labours of the were rejected. Subsequently to the siege :commencement of the war, circum

Colonel the Hon. A. Wellesley to Lieut.- General Harris.

" MY DEAR SIR,

7 A.M., 3d May. “ We did all our work last night, except filling the sand-bags, which could not be done for want of tools : I shall have them filled in the course of this morning, and there will be no inconvenience from the delay, as it was not deemed advisable last night to do more than look for the ford; and it is not intended to do any thing to it until the night before it is to be used. Lieut. Lalor, of the 73d, crossed over to the glacis, I believe, on the left of the breach. He found the wall, which he believes to be the retaining wall of the glacis, seven feet high, and the water (included in those seven feet) fourteen inches deep. It is in no part more so, and the passage by no means difficult. Several other officers crossed by different routes, but none went so far as Lieut. Lalor. agree in the practicability of crossing with troops. The enemy built up the breach in the night with gabions, &c., notwithstanding the fire which was kept up upon it. It was impossible to fire grape, as our working party was in front of the five-gun battery, from which alone we could fire, as we repaired the other.

Lieut. Lalor is now on duty here with his regiment; but if you wish it, he will remain here to-night, and try the river again.

I am, my dear Sir, &c.

AN

“ I have not heard any thing of the 12-pounders ordered to a new situation by the general orders of yesterday."

On the 3d of May, the breach was ant Lawrence of the 77th. Colonel reported to be practicable, and prepa- Wellesley remained with his brigade rations were made for the assault on in the advanced trenches, prepared to the day following. In order to avoid support the assault whenever his asexciting the suspicions of the enemy, sistance might be required. the troops were stationed in the At one o'clock, the silence that trenches before daybreak, though the reigned in the trenches was broken by time chosen for the attack was the the voice of Baird :-“ Come, my hour which succeeds mid-day, when brave fellows,” he exclaimed, “ folit is the uniform custom of natives of low me, and show yourselves worthy warm climates to indulge in a siesta. of the name of British soldiers !" The Experience had shown that the be- columns were instantly in motion ; sieged were always more vigilant dur- this breach was carried after a short ing the night than in the sultry period struggle, and the British colour was of noontide heat.

planted on the summit of it, by a The storming party, under com- brave sergeant of the forlorn hope, mand of Major-General Baird,* con- whose name was Graham. The left sisted of 2500 Europeans and 1900 column encountered a more vigorous native infantry. This force was di- resistance. Traverses had been cut, vided into two columns. The right and the enemy defended them sucwas commanded by Colonel Sher- cessively with the most determined brooke ; the left by Lieut.-Colonel

bravery.

The assailants were checkDunlop: Each of these divisions was ed in their progress, and in all probaheaded by a forlorn hope ; that of the bility all their efforts to advance would right, under Lieutenant Hill of the have been unavailing, had not a nar74th, and that of the left by Lieuten- row opening, left for the passage of

We shall gratify thousands by giving here the admirable Inscription (written by Theodore Hook) on the obelisk erected on the Hill of Tammy-Haslle, by Lady Baird.

IN HONOUR AND TO THE MEMORY OF
GENERAL SIR DAVID BAIRD,

BART., G.C.B. & K.c.
THIS COLUMN WAS ERECTED

A.D. 1832.
TO INDOMITABLE COURAGE IN THE FIELD,

HE UNITED

WISDOM AND PRUDENCE

IN THE COUNCIL.
A BRAVE BUT GENEROUS ENEMY,
HIS VICTORIES WERE EVER TEMPERED BY MERCY:
AND WITH HIS ARDENT LOVE OF GLORY

WAS BLENDED
THE TENDEREST CARE FOR HIS GALLANT AND DEVOTED FOLLOWERS.
THE DETAILS OF HIS PUBLIC SERVICES ARE RECORDED

IN THE ANNALS OF HIS COUNTRY:
HIS PRIVATE VIRTUES ARE EMBALMED IN THE HEARTS OF HIS FRIENDS.

HONOUR AND DUTY WERE THE GUIDING STARS OF HIS DESTINY :
PIETY AND CHARITY THE LEADING CHARACTERISTICS OF HIS MIND,
HE FELT NO JEALOUSIES. HE HARBOURED NO RESENTMENTS.

HE KNEW NO GUILE.
IN THE LAND OF HIS FATHERS

HE AT LAST FOUND
REPOSE AND HAPPINESS IN DOMESTIC LIFE ;
FORGETTING THE CARES AND TURMOILS OF HIS EVENTFUL

AND BRILLIANT CAREER :
AND IN THE EXERCISE OF EVERY SOCIAL AND CHRISTIAN VIRTUE,

HE DIED BELOVED AND LAMENTED,

AS HE HAD LIVED
HONOURED AND RENOWNED.

fate.

the workmen, been fortunately disco- but returned the same answer. Tippoo vered. By this, the traverses were gave him money, and desired him to pray flanked, and the enemy was driven for him, and then drank water out of a from them with great slaughter. It black stone as a charm against misforwas here that Tippoo fought, and by

tune. his presence animated the courage of

“ When the assault commenced, he rethe troops. He was a brave man,

paired to the outer ramparts ; but being whose virtues and vices were alike

driven from them, he fell as he was rebarbaric, and it is impossible, we

turning into the body of the place, in a think, not to feel some interest in his

passage under the inner rampart called the We are sure, therefore, our

Water-Gate, his horse falling at the same readers will thank us for the following down, the road was choaked up, and al

time ; and his palankeen being thrown extract, from the admirable letters of Sir Thomas Munro.

most every soul in the gateway slain.

Though he had got a wound in the leg, “ His repulse at Seringapatam seems to and two or three balls in the body, he was have discouraged Tippoo so much, that he still alive, and continued in this state above gave very little interruption to the march an hour. One of his servants, Ragoo of the grand army. As it approached, he Khan, who lay wounded beside him, asked fell back, and shut himself up in his capi- his leave once or twice, when parties of tal, placing his dependence upon the siege soldiers were passing, to discover him, being raised for want of provisions in but he always commanded him to be silent. camp, and upon his holding out till the At last a soldier who was passing in quest Cauvery should fill, and make the carrying of plunder, and at whom it is said he aton of any farther operations against it tempted to cut, shot him through the head : impracticable. He seldom went to his the ball entered the right temple, and palace during the siege, but spent most of passed through the left jaw. It was for a his time sitting behind a cavalier, or visit- long time thought that he had concealed ing the ramparts.

He did not go towards himself in the palace ; and while parties the breach,—the state of it was concealed were searching it to no purpose, in order from him by his principal officers ; but to put him to death for the murder of one of his servants, impatient at hearing nine Europeans who had fallen into his the false reports brought to him, called hands on the 5th of April, the Killedar out to him that there was a breach, and reported that he had been seen lying in that it would soon be practicable.

This the Water-Gate. As it was now dark, a intelligence seemed to rouse him,—he re- party was sent with lights to search for solved to see it with his own eyes; and him. After dragging out a great number therefore, on the following morning, which of bodies, he was at last found half naked : was that of the day previous to the as- he was known by his long drawers, and by sault, he went early to the spot ; he view- some marks about his person.

He was ed with amazement the condition in which drawn from amidst a heap of slain, among it was, he shook his head, but said no- whom his legs were twisted, and carried thing ; he returned to his old station be- to the palace, where he was laid on a hind the cavalier, where he remained sul- palankeen, and exposed to view all next len and buried in thought, as if conscious day, in order that no doubt might remain that his doom was now fixed, seldom mak- of his death ; and in the evening he was ing any inquiries about what was doing, buried with military honours in the cypress and driving away with an angry answer garden, by the side of his father. With whoever came to ask him for orders. him fell at once the whole fabric of his Bigot as he was, his apprehensions ren- empire, for the very means he had taken dered him superstitious enough to induce to strengthen it hastened its downfall." him to invite the aid of Hindoo prayers

After the capture of Seringapatam, and ceremonies to avert the evil which threatened him, and to call for a Hindoo

Colonel Wellesley being the next for astrologer to draw a favourable omen from duty, assumed the command within the stars. With a man of this description

the city. It need scarcely be stated, he spent the last morning of his life ; he that he exerted his utmost efforts to

predesired him to consult the heavens.

The

vent pillage, and excess of every kind. man answered, that he had done so, and that Cowle* flags were displayed in every they were unfavourable unless peace was quarter of the town, and Colonel Wel. made. He was ordered to look again, lesley went himself to the houses of

Cowle means truce, amnesty, protection,

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