Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE. LARGEST REPUBLICAN CIRCULATION. THE TRIBUNE BEATS THE RECORD.

THE TRIBUNE begins the new subscription year with a circulation unparalleled in its previous history. The paper has hbored with its whole strength during the Presidential campaign, and its earnest advocacy of Republican principles has been met by the Republican party with an unexampled support.

During election week THE TRIBUNE made a spurt; and its circulation, in racing parlance, broke all previous records. The following was the actual circulation for the seven days ending November 9:

Monday, November 3

99,100 Tuesday, November 4.

101,500 Wednesday, November 5..

188,600 Thursday, November 6....

167, 100 Friday, November 7......

160,600 Saturday, November 8

172,000 Sunday, November 9....

129,000 Weekly, November 5, exclusive of all short term campaign subscriptions.. 145,910 Semi-Weekly.......

38,300 Total number of copies sold during the week.......

..1,202,110 Ninety-four tons of paper were used in this work. The following week THE TRIBUNE settled down to a steady gait. The bona fide sales of THE DAILY averaged 121,400 per day; THE WEEKLY was 142,650, exclusive of short term campaign subscriptions; and the SENI-WEEKLY was 36,700. Or, 1,0:29,150 copies during the week. Those desiring to verify these figures can do so in Tue TRIBUNE counting-room, where the affidavits of the press-men, the cashier, the paper makers, and others are on file

THE TRIBUNE has publicly challenged The New York Times to a comparison of actual circulation. Though the challenge has been published day after day, it has not been accepted.

During 1886 THE TRIBUNE will strive more zealously and hopefully than ever for its political faith. The return to
power of the party that brought on the Rebellion must make the coming year one of the most interesting in our history.
The more the people know of how Democrats deal with their government, the surer is Republican success the next time.
The TRIBUNE gives the news fully and fairly; it is a safe and attractive paper for the family circle; and is the persistent
advocate of work for American workmen, and the general protection of American interests. The paper is printed in
clear, large, easily-read type.
THE WEEKLY is printed on Wednesday, and can usually be delivered on the day of publication.
THE SEMI-WEEKLY, containing twice the matter of The Weekly, is printed before daylight on Tuesday and
Friday, contains the editorials, etc., of the Daily the same morning, and is sent out of town on the same early fast mail
trains that carry the bundles of the Daily. For the general reader it is as good a paper for dews as his own local daily ;
for literary and special matter it is apt to be superior.

TERMS TO MAIL SUBSCRIBERS.
TES TRIBUNE will be sent, postage paid, to all parts of the United States at the following reduced rates :-

1 Year. 6 Months. 3 Months. 1 Month. DAILY, with Sunday..

$8.50 $4.25 $2.15 $0.75 DAILY, without Sunday..

7.00 3.50

1.75

0.75 SUNDAY TRIBUNE..

1.50
SEMI-WEEKLY, $2.50 a year; in clubs of ten, $2.00 a year, with extra copy to man sending club.
WEEKLY, $1.25 a year; in clubs of ten, $1.00 a year, with extra copy to man sending club.
Specimen copies sent free. Address simply

THE TRIBUNE, New York.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

1885.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR.

ECLECTIC MAGAZINE

OF

FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART.

NHE Foreign Magazines embody the most scholarly, vigorous, and searching thought of the age. as a rule, before it is finally put into book form. It is the aim of the ECLECTIC MAGAZINE to select and reprint all the representative articles thus given to the world. The subscriber has then at his command in a compact form the best digested work of the master-minds of the age.

The plan of the Eclectic includes SCIENCE, ESSAYS, REVIEWS, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, HISTORICAL PAPERS, ART CRITICISM, TRAVELS, POETRY, and SHORT STORIES.

ITS EDITORIAL DEPARTMENTS comprise LITERARY NOTICES, dealing with current home books, FOREIGN LITERARY NOTES, SCIENCE, AND ART, summariz ing briefly the new discoveries and achievements in this field, and consisting of choice extracts from new books and foreign journals. These departments are of great value to the readers of the ECLECTic. The Magazine will strive earnestly to meet the tastes of the most thoughtful and intelligent classes, and to present articles by the leading thinkers on both sides of the questions absorbing the attention of the religious, literary, scientific, and art world. The field of selection will be mainly the English magazines, reviews, and weeklies, to which indeed most of the great continental authors are contributors But articles will also be translated from the French and German periodicals for publication in the Eclectic, whenever it is deemed desirable. The subjoined lists exhibit the principal sources whence the material is drawn, and the names of some of the leading authors whose articles may be expected to appear : PERIODICALS.

AUTHORS.
QUARTERLY REVIEW,

Right Hon. W. E. GLADSTONE,
British QUARTERLY REVIEW,

ALFRED TENNYSON,
EDINBURGH Review,

PROFESSOR HUXLEY,
WESTMINSTER REVIEW,

PROFESSOR TYNDALL,
CONTEMPORARY REVIEW,

RICHARD A. PROCTOR, B. A.
FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW,

J. NORMAN LOCKYER, F. R. S.
THE NINETEENTH CENTURY,

DR W. B CARPENTER,
SCIENCE MISCELLANY,

E. B. TYLOR,
BLACKWOOD's MAGAZINE,

PROFESSOR MAX MÜLLER,
CORNHILL MAGAZINE,

PROFESSOR Owen,
MACMILLAN'S MAGAZINE,

MATTHEW ARNOLD,
LONGMAN'S MAGAZINE,

EDWARD A. FREEMAN, D. C. L.
New QUARTERLY MAGAZINE,

JAMES ANTHONY FROUDE,
TEMPLE BAR,

THOMAS HOGHES,
BELGRAVIA,

ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE,
GOOD WORDS,

WILLIAM BLACK,
LONDON SOCIETY,

MRS OLI PHANT,
SATURDAY REVIEW,

CARDINAL NEWMAN,
THE SPECTATOR,

CARDINAL MANNING,
THE ACADEMY,

Miss THACKERAY,
THE ATHENÆUM,

Thomas HARDY,
NATURE,

ROBERT BUCHANAN,
KKOWLEDGE,

W. H. MALLOCK,
Das RÄNDCHAU,

PROF. ERNEST HAECKEL,
REVUE des Deux MONDES, ETC., ETC.

HENRY TAINE, ETC., ETC.
The aim of the Eclectic is to be instructive and not sensational, and it commends itself particularly to
Teachers, Scholars, Lawyers, Clergymen, and all intelligent readers who desire to keep abreast of the intel-
lectual progress of the age.

STEEL ENGRAVINGS. The Eclectic comprises each year two large volumes of over 1700 pages. Each of these volumes contains a fine steel engraving, which adds much to the attraction of the magazine.

TERMS: Single copies, 45 cents; one copy, one year, $5.00; five copies, $20. Trial subscription for three months, $1. The ECLECTIC and any $4 magazine, $8. Postage free to all subscribers. E. R. PELTON, Publisher, 25 Bond St., New York.

1885. THE CHRISTIAN UNION.

1885.

On the First of January, 1885, THE CHRISTIAN UNION, which bas been already once enlarged from a Twenty to a Twenty-Four Page paper, will be further enlarged, and

Will become a Thirty-Two Page Paper. It will then give its readers a larger amount of literary matter each week than any other

RELIGIOUS WEEKLY IN THIS COUNTRY, IF NOT IN THE WORLD.

IT IS NOT:
A DENOMINATIONAL journal: devoted to the interests of a party or a sect.
A CHURCH NEWS paper : devoted to village gossip and ecclesiastical machinery.
A THEOLOGICAL paper: devoted to acrimonious debates about abstruse doctrines.
A WEEKLY SCRAP paper: made up of scissorings from other newspapers.
A DAILY paper : reprinted in the form of a weekly.
A STORY paper : filled up with sensational and sentimental fiction.

IT IS:
A NEWS paper : giving a full report of the world's history week by week, and interpreting it.
A CHRISTIAN paper : applying to every practical question social, political, domestic, and personal – the princi.

ples taught in the New Testament. A PROGRESSIVE paper: teaching about the things of today, that its readers may be better prepared for tomorrow. A COMPREHENSIVE paper: concerned with everything that concerns the well-being of men and women. A HOME paper: edited in a home, and for home reading. A HELPFUL paper: aiming in every article to make its readers better, wiser, ha er. A FEARLESS paper: owing nothing to a party, a sect, or a faction. A CLEAN paper: allowing no "paid advertisements" in its editorial departments, and no dubious advertisements any

where. AR INTERESTING paper : edited on the principle that " If you can't make a paper so attractive that people will be eager to read it, you had better not make it at all."

ITS PECULIAR FEATURES ARE:
The Outlook.

Young Folks.
The Four Great Cities.

Evening Lamp.
Hints, Questions, and Experiences.

The Spectator.
Sunday School Papers.

Inquiring Friends.
The Home.

Sunday Afternoon.
Books and Authors.

LYMAN ABBOTT.

EDITORS:

HAMILTON W. MABIE.

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS:
S. AUSTIN ALLIBONE, LL. D. Rev. WM. E. MERRIMAN, D. D. Rev. W. W. NEWTON.
PRES. I. W. ANDREWS, D.D. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D. EGBERT C. SMYTH, D.D.
Rev. A. H. BRADFORD.

Rev. WINCHESTER DONALD. J. H. SEELYE, D. D.
EDWARD BEECHER, D.D. Rev. J. LEONARD CORNING. Rev. NEWMAN SMYTH, D. D.
Rev. GEORGE M. BOYNTON. HOWARD CROSBY, D. D.

Rev. REUEN THOMAS, D.D. H. H. BOYESEN.

Rev. MALCOLM MCG. DANA, D.D. Rev. C. P. THWING. WOLCOTT CALKINS, D. D. C. F. DEEMS, D. D.

GEORGE M. TOWLE. Rav. J. MAX HARK.

SAMUEL W. DUFFIELD, D.D. Rev. S. H. VIRGIN. Rev. SAMUEL E. HERRICK, D.D. Pror. T. S. DOOLITTLE, D.D. PROF. GEORGE F. WRIGHT. Rev. H. C. HAYDEN, D. D.

Rev. JOSEPH T. DURYÉA, D.D. Rev. J. R. THOMPSON. BENSON J. LOSSING, LL. D. WASHINGTON GLADDEŃ. Rev. C. D. W. BRIDGEMAN, D.D.

GENERAL CONTRIBUTORS: SUSAN HALE.

RT. Rev. THOMAS M. CLARK, MRS. MULOCK-CRAIK. PHILLIPS BROOKS.

RT. Rev. F. D. HUNTINGTON. Rev. GEORGE A. GORDON. HOWARD CROSBY, D. D.

RT. Rev. HENRY M. POTTER. S. H. THAYER.
JOHN G. WHITTIER.
AUSTIN PHELPS, D. D.

AUSTIN BIERBOWER.
GEORGE W. CABLE.

HELEN JACKSON (" H. H.”). LEONARD W. BACON, D.D. Ex-GOVERNOR LONG.

CONSTANCE FENIMORE J. M. LUDLOW, D.D. JOSEPH HATTON.

WOOLSON. EMILY HUNTINGTON MILLER. EDWARD EVERETT HALE. HELEN CAMPBELL.

PROF. GEORGE P. FISHER. H. H. BOYESEN.

ROSE HAWTHORNE LATHROP. R. W. DALE.
HORACE E. SCUDDER.
HESBA STRETTON.

Rev. G. F. PENTECOST.
CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER. ELIZABETH STUART PHELPS. ELIOT MCCORMICK.
BENSON J. LOSSING.
SUSAN COOLIDGE.

Prof. WILLIAM C. WILKINSON.
GENERAL 0. O. HOWARD.
LUCY LARCOM.

R. W. RAYMOND.
MARGARET VANDEGRIFT. NEWMAN SMYTH, D.D.

MARY WAGER-FISHER.
DORA READ GOODALE.
WILLIAM H. BISHOP.

JULIE C. R. DORR.
EDWIN D. MEAD.

GEORGE PARSONS LATHROP. SOPHIE WINTHROP.
RABBI GOTTHEIL.

MARGARET E. SANGSTER, KATE UPSON CLARK,
G. S. MERRIAM.

TERMS:
Three Dollars for One Year. One Dollar for Four Months.

SPECIMEN COPIES SENT FREE.
Special Advantages to Clubs and Neighborhood Canvassers. Address
THE CHRISTIAN UNION,

20 LAFAYETTE PLACE, N. Y, CITY.

LITTELL'S LIVING AGE.

[graphic]

wit

the constant commendation and support of the leading men and journals a

the country, and with uninterrupted success.
LIVING
ACE.

A WEEKLY MAGAZINE, it gives fifty-two numbers of sixty-fou pages each, or more than Three and a Quarter Thousand double-col umn octavo pages of reading-matter yearly. It presents in an inexpensive form considering its amount of matter, and with a combined freshness and complete

ness nowhere else attempted, The best Essays, Reviews, Criticisms, Serial and Short Stories, Sketches of Travel and Discovery,

Poetry, Scientific, Biographical, Historical, and Political Information from the

entire body of Foreign Periodical Literature and from the pens of

The Foremost Living Writers. The ablest and most cultivated intellects, in every department of Literature, Sci ence, Politics, and Art, find expression in the Periodical Literature of Europe, and especially of Great Britain.

The Living Age, forming four large volumes a year, furnishes from the great and generally inaccessible mass of this literature, the only compilation that, while within the reach of all, is satisfactory in the COMPLETENESS with which it embraces whatever is of immediate interest, or of solid, permanent value.

It is therefore indispensable to every one who wishes to keep pace with the events or intellectual progress of the time, or to cultivate in himself or his family general intelligence and literary taste.

OPINIONS. THE LIVING AGE retains the breadth, variety, and accu- yet fresh, the productions of the foremost writers of the rate sense of value which first achieved its reputation.. day.- Montreal Gazelle. Nearly the whole world of authors and writers appear in For over forty years it has remained the guide-post of it in their best moods. ... Art, science, and literature intelligence. – New Haven Evening Register. find fresh and eloquent expression in its pages from the It was always good, but its best days are now. – Philapens of the best writers of the day; and the reader is kept delphia Evening Bulletin. well abreast of the current thought of the age. Boston Through its pages alone it is possible to be as well inJournal.

formed in current literature as by the perusal of a long Biography, fiction, science, criticism, history, poetry, list of monthlies. — Philadelphia Inquirer. travels, whatever men are interested in, all are found It is an invaluable help to one who desires to keep up here, and it is truly a panoramic exhibition of the Living with the leading thought and writing of the day. It saves Age. ... It furnishes more for the money it costs than not only time, but money. — Pacific Churchman (San Franany other periodical within our knowledge. - The Watch- cisco). man (Boston).

Every one of its fifty-two numbers brings something It has long been one of the most attractive literary com- which one must read to know what is being thought of panions of the time, and it may be truthfully and cor- and talked of. ... It is indispensable in every household dially said that it never offers a dry or valuelese page. — where any attempt is made to keep up with the current New York Tribune.

thought of the day. - Hartford Courani. It has now for many years held the first place of all our Foremost of the eclectic periodicals. – New York World. serial publications. : . The only possible objection that In reading its closely printed pages one is brought in could be urged to it is the immense amount of reading it contact with the men who are making opinion the world gives. . . . There is nothing noteworthy in science, art, over. Episcopal Kerorder (Philadelphia). literature, biography, philosophy, or religion that cannot It enables its readers to keep fully abreast of the best be found in it. . . . It gives in accessible form the best thought and literature of civilization. - Christian Adre. thought of the age. - The Churchman (New York).

cate (Pittsburgh). With each revolving year it increases in value. . . . No It furnishes a complete compilation of an indispensable other periodical gives so diversified a view of current lit- literature. Chicago Evening Journal. erature. - Presbyterian Banner (Pittsburgh).

As much a necessity as ever. – The Advance (Chicago). It enables the reader to keep pace with the best thought The queen of all the eclectics. — Southern Churchman and literary work of our time. – Christian Union (New (Richmond). York).

It still keeps to the front as the best of all magazines. There is nothing like it. – Christian al Work (New If limited to but one publication, we would infinitely preYork).

fer THE LIVING AGE to all others. . . . It stands alone in It has become indispensable. - New York Observer. its excellence. – Morning Star (Wilmington, N. C.).

It has for us an interest and value beyond those of any It is one of the marvels of the age. - Spectator (Hamilother publication. Coning once a week, it gives, while ton, Canada).

PUBLISHED WEEKLY at $8.00 a year, free of postage.

T TO NEW SUBSCRIBERS for the year 1885, remitting before January 1, the weekly numbers of 1884 issued after the receipt of their subscriptions will be sent gratis.

CLUB PRICES FOR THE BEST HOME AND FOREIGN LITERATURE. (Possessed of LITTELL'S LIVING AGE, and of one or other of our vivacious American monthlies, a subscriber will find himself in command of the whole situation. - Philadelphia Evening Bulletin.]

For $10.50, THE LIVING AGE and any one of the four-dollar monthly magazines (or Hurper's Weekly or Bazar) will be sent for a year, with postage prepaid on both; or, for $9.50, Tue Living AGE and the St. Nicholas or Lippincott's Monthly, post-paid. ADDRESS

LITTELL & CO., 31 Bedford St., Boston.

[graphic]
« AnteriorContinuar »