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early New Englanders will not suffer in comparison, if tested by their power to produce those strong Christian virtues which are so earnestly insisted on in every part of the Word of God, and without which if I read that Word aright-whether there be a Christ or no Christ, no man shall enter into the kingdom of Heaven. Had the New Englander's conception of God's government, justice, and holiness been less solemn than it was, had his standard of morality been lower than it was, the fruits of the civilization which he founded, and of the Christianity which he cherished, would not be so precious as they are even now.

Again, it was owing to New England ideas and the same conciliating spirit in politics that has characterized Congregationalists in religious work, that patriotic men in the South were made prominent as leaders in the struggle for our national independence, and that by a practical unity of the whole country, our independence was so early gained and a republican form of government established.

In the development of this government and the establishment of universal freedom, New England ideas, though for a time overpowered, have at last been triumphant. Was it an accident that within three months after that Dutch manof-war had landed twenty negroes on the coast of Virginia, and they had been sold as slaves, the Mayflower appeared off the coast of Massachusetts bearing one hundred and two pilgrims? I see in the coming years the chains carried from Virginia to Texas, new links constantly forged and new victims manacled, until they are numbered by millions. But I see the institutions and principles of the Pilgrims, taking possession of New England, of the great Middle States, of the mighty Northwest, on to the shores of the Pacific ; carried everywhere by the sturdy settlers who fell the forests and plant civilization ; proclaimed and advocated from ten thousand pulpits, not of their faith only but of every Christian faith. As I watch these two forces, slavery and barbarism at the South, freedom and civilization in the North, moving along resistlessly in parallel lines across the continent, I see that one of these is the agent in God's hands for the destruction of the other. And when the irrepressible conflict came, as come it must, in that supreme moment of mortal agony, when a great nation plunged into a sea of blood for its own purification from a national crime, God, the God of our New England fathers, gave the victory to New England ideas, and secured, in name at least, to every man, woman, and child in the country, without regard to race, color, or previous condition of servitude, the same freedom and the same rights which we, the children of New England, have always enjoyed. Whether this universal freedom shall in coming generations be the heritage of every child of the Republic, will depend upon the unity and firmness with which the children of New England shall stand by the ideas of New England.

INDEX.

106,

Adams, John,
142 Botsford, William,

· 107
His opinion of Yale College Brace, Rev. Joab,

51
and Connecticut,
129 Bradley, Philip B.,

44
American Board of Commission- Brainerd, John G. C.,

138
ers for Foreign Missions, 133, 188 Extract from poem of,

129, 130
“American Hero," by Niles, 32–34 Branford,

- 140
Amherst College,
117 Bray, Rev. Thomas,

117
Arnold, Thomas, of Rugby, Eng.,195 Brockway, Rev. Thomas, 78, 79
Atkins, Rev. Elisha,
82 Bulkley, Rev. Gershom,

28
Austin, Aaron,
132 Burgoyne, Gen. John,

34, 56
Avery, Rev. David,

44

57, 59, 122
Notice of sermon of,
45 Burke, Edmund,

127
Burton, Rev. Asa,

- 179
Backus, Rev. Azel, -

107

Bushnell, Rev. Horace, 197, 199
Backus, Rev. Charles,

117
Byles, Rev. Mather,

74
Bacon, Rev. David,

186
Badger, Rev. Joseph,
186 Calhoun, John C.,

137
Baldwin, Rev. Ebenezer,

38, 39 Opinion of the influence of
46, 47, 166, 174, 186, 188 Conn.,

142
Baldwin, Roger Sherman, 138 Cambridge Platform,

- 163
Bancroft, George,
- 202 Case, Rev. Wheeler,

34
Baptist churches,

173 Catechism, Westminster, 3, 134,
Barlow, Joel,

22
In schools,

167
Bartlett, Rev. Nathaniel,
47 Indian, by Pierson,

199
Beebe, Rev. James, -

40 Champion, Rev. Judah, 57-60, 174
Beecher, Rev. Lyman, 189, 197 Channing, Rev. Wm. Ellery, - 182
His views on the defeat of the Charities, growth of, 185, 186
“Standing order," 175, 176 Charles II, letter of,

11
Belden, Rev. Joshua,

50 Charlestown, Ms., burning of, 32
Bellamy, Rev. Joseph, 40, 117 Charter of 1662, extract from, 9

179, 196 Chaucer's good minister, 138
Benedict, Rev. Joel,
73 Chauncey, Charles,

142
Berkeley, Bishop George, - 109 Chauncey, Col. Elihu,

17
Bible in schools, -
- 167 Chauncey, Rev. Israel,

28
Bird, Rev. Samuel,

28 Chauncey, Rev. Nathaniel, - - 107
Bishop, Abraham,

- 100 Christian experience, change in
Bliss, Rev. John,
- 132 type of,

184, 185
Boardman, Rev. Benjamin, 28 Christian homes,

· 177
Book companies,

110-116 Christian literature, growth of,
Boston Port bill,
18

193-201

Christian Sentinel,
200 ('onnecticut Gazette,

200
Christian Spectator,
200 ('onnecticut Reserve,

125
Church, Samuel,

138 Consociations, influence of in
Church member excommuni- regard to errors,

183
cated for trading with the Constitution of 1639,

150
British,
26 Cotton, Rev. John,

137
Church members, gaining on the Cowper's good minister,

139
population,

190
Daggett, David,

137
Churches, progress of, -

190, 191

Daggett, Rev. Naphtali, 62–66, 124
Are schools,

168, 169
Capture of,

64-66
Civil government, origin of in

Dana, Rev. James, 60–62, 166
Connecticut colony, 145–151

Notice of sermon of,

61
New Haven colony,

154-157
Dana, Samuel W.,

142
Relations of to the churches, - 172

Dana, Rev. Sylvester,

117
Instituted in Conn., for the

Davenport, Rev. John, 9, 154, 155
churches, and by their mem-

159, 163, 164, 196
bers,

159

Despondency at absorption of
Relations to the churches not

New Haven colony by Con-
the same in the two colo-

necticut,

162
nies—the difference stated,

Discourse by,

193
160, 161

Day, Rev. Jeremiah, of New
Cogswell, Rev. James,

35, 80
Preston,

174
Collamer, Jacob, -

125

Day, Rev. Jeremiah, President, 127
Common schools,

167
Deane, Silas,

-21, 136
Bible in,

167

Declaration of independence, by
Westminster Catechism in, - 167
Conciliation, spirit of in politics, 205 Democratic party, growth of, 95, 96

General Assembly of Conn., 19, 20
Congregational churches, 176

Issues made by,

98-102
Relations to civil aflairs, - 165

De Tocqueville, Alexis, His
166, 176

opinion of Connecticut, 143, 144
Relations to common schools,

Devotion, Rev. Ebenezer,

80
176, 177
Devotion, Rev. John,

84
Relations to education,

166
Dissenters,

163
Relations to reforms, - 169
District schools,

7
Standing order,

175
Dorchester, Mass.,

147, 149
Congregational ministers, oppo-

Dryden's good minister,

139
sition to, -

175

Dwight, Rev. Timothy, Presi-
Congregationalism,

146

dent, 22, 71-73, 107, 127, 179
Congregationalists in 1774, 172

180, 183, 184, 197, 198, 199
Connecticut, Calhoun's opinion

“ Columbia.”

72, 73
of, - -

142

Extract from sermon of,
Founded for and by the

“Greenfield Hill,"

90-92
churches,

151

On early ministers of Conn., -
General condition of in 1776, 30

Theology,

180
Land of steady habits,

7
Share of, in the revolution, Early marriages,

- 135
174, 175 Early ministers of Connecticut,
Connecticut Evangelical Maga-

and good manners,

126, 127
zine,

133, 185, 200! Dwight's opinion of,

-

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104

-

96

Educated, how and where, 4 Fairfield East Association, ac-
Educators,

106-116 tion of on learning and re-
Farmers, -

ligion,

38
Leaders of the people,

3 Falmouth, now Portland, Me.,
Love liberty,
10, 20, 21 burning of,

32
Loyal to the King,
11 Family religion,

6
Early New England literature, Faulkner's Island and British
character and extent of, 194–196 vessels,

140
East Guilford, now Madison, 140 Federal Convention, influence
Skirmishes with the British,

of Connecticut in, - - 142

140, 141 Federal party, described, - 98
Eaton, Theophilus,

154, 155 Struggles with the Democratic
Edmund, William,
132 party,

- 98-102
Edwardean Theology, - 179, 180' Finney, Rev. Charles G.,- - 184
Edwards, Rev. Jonathan, Presi- Fire lands,

125
dent,

117, 179 First book published in Conn., - 194
Writings of,

196 Fish, Rev. Joseph,
Edwards, Rev. Jonathan, the Fisher, Alexander,

- 107
younger, 117, 179, 180, 189, 197 Fisher, Rev. George P.,

180
Edwards, Pierrepont,
137 Foreign missions,

188
Eells, Rev. John,

28, 50 Fowler, Rev. William C., letter
Eells, Rev. Nathaniel, -

of on town libraries, 108–116
Extract from sermon of, 77 Franklin, Benjamin,

· 136
Election sermons, extracts from, French infidelity,

82–88
Eliot, Rev. Andrew,
41 Gage, Gen. Thomas,

32
Extracts from letters of, 41 Gay, Rev. Ebenezer,

53
119-124 General Assembly of Conn. de-
Eliot, Rev. Jared,

104 clare their loyalty in 1774, 12-14
And his negro, Kedar, 135

Declare independence,

19, 20
Eliot, Rev. John, and his Indian General Association of Conn.,
Bible,
195, 196

162, 166, 186
Eliot, Rev. John, of Madison, 141 Condole with ministers of Bos-
Ellis, Rev. John,
76 ton in 1774,

34, 35
Ellsworth, Oliver,

21, 107, Call to humiliation in 1775

115, 136, 142 and 1776, - - - - - 35–37, 38
Ellsworth, William W.,

138 Early home missionary action
Ely, Rev. David,

47, 48
of,

132, 133
Ely, Rev. Zebulon,

76 General Court of Conn., origin
Emigration from Conn., 125 of,

- 150
Influence of,

189 Constitution of, in 1639, - 150
Emmons, Rev. Nathaniel, 107, 117 Assumed control of churches, 161

179, 187 Interfered with affairs of
Episcopal movement in Strat-

churches in Hartford,
ford,

164 Windsor, and Wethersfield, 161
Episcopalians in Conn., in 1774, 173' George III,

166
Eustis, Gov. William, of Mass., Giddings, Rev. Salmon, - 186
117, 118 Gilbert, Sylvester,

132
Exercise scheme,
179 Goddard, Calvin,

137

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