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Tro. Beshrew the witch! with venomous wights

6

she stays,

As tediously? as hell; but flies the grasps of love,
With wings more momentary-swift than thought.
You will catch cold, and curse me.
CRES.

Pr'ythee, tarry ;-
You men will never tarry:-
O foolish Cressid !- I might have still held off,
And then

you would have tarried. Hark! there's

one up:

Pan. [Within.] What, are all the doors open here?

Tro. It is your uncle.

Enter PANDARUS.

CRES. A pestilence on lim! now will he be

mocking: I shall have such a life,

• — venomous wights-] i. e. venefici; those who practise nocturnal sorcery. STEEVENS. ? As tediously-] The folio has :

As hideously as hell. Johnson. Sir T. Hanmer, for the sake of metre, with great probability, reads :

Tedious as hell ; &c. STEEVENS." & Enter Pandarus.] The hint for the following short conversation between Pandarus and Cressida is taken from Chaucer's Troilus and Cresseide, Book III. v. 1561 :

6 Pandare, a morowe which that commen was

“ Unto his necè, gan her faire to grete,
“ And saied all this night so rained it alas!
That all my drede is, that ye,

nece swete, “ Have little leisir had to slepe and mete, “ All night (quod he hath rain so do mé wake, “ That some of us I trowe their heddis ake.

Pan. How now, how now? how go maidenheads? -Here, you maid! where's my cousin Cressid? CREs. Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking

uncle! You bring me to do, and then you

flout me too. Pan. To do what? to do what ?-let her say what: what have I brought you to do? CRES. Come, come;

beshrew your heart ! you'll ne'er be good, Nor suffer others.

PAN. Ha, ha! Alas, poor wretch! a poor ca. pocchia !!—hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty man, let it sleep? a bugbear take him!

[Knocking. CRES. Did I not tell you ?—'would he were

knock'd o'the head!

ye ben, God

hertè care,

1

“ Cresseide answerde, nevir the bet for you,
“ Foxe that

yeve your
“ God help me so, ye causid all this fare," &c.

STEEVENS. me to do,] To do is here used in a wanton sense. So, in The Taming of the Shrew, Petruchio says: “I would fain be doing."

Again, in All's well that ends well, Lafeu declares that he is past doing.” COLLINS.

- a poor capocchia!] Pandarus would say, I think, in English-Poor innocent! Poor fool! hast not slept to-night? These appellations are very well answered by the Italian word capocchio: for capocchio signifies the thick head of a club; and thence metaphorically, a head of not much brain, a sot, dullard, heavy gull. “THEOBALD.

The word in the old copy is chipochia, for which Mr. Theobald substituted capocchio, which he has rightly explained. Capochia may perhaps be used with propriety in the same sense, when applied to a female ; but the word has also an entirely different meaning, not reconcilable to the context here, for which I choose to refer the reader to Florio's Italian Dictionary, 1598. MALONE, VOL. XV.

2c

Tro. Beshrew the witch! with venomous wights

she stays,
As tediously? as hell; but flies the grasps of love,
With wings more momentary-swift than thought.
You will catch cold, and curse me.
CRES.

Pr’ythee, tarry ;-
You men will never tarry.
O foolish Cressid !- I might have still held off,
And then

you

would have tarried. Hark! there's

one up.

Pan. [Within.] What, are all the doors open here?

Tro. It is your uncle.

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CRES. A pestilence on him! now will he be

mocking: I shall have such a life,

6 — venomous wights-] i. e. venefici; those who practise nocturnal sorcery. STEEVENS. ? As tediously-] The folio has :

As hideously as hell. Johnson. Şir T. Hanmer, for the sake of metre, with great probability, reads :

Tedious as hell ; &c. STEEVENS. & Enter Pandarus.] The hint for the following short con-. versation between Pandarus and Cressida is taken from Chaucer's Troilus and Cresseide, Book III. v. 1561 :

“ Pandare, a mórowe which that commen was

“ Unto his necè, gan her faire to grete,
“ And saied all this night so rained it alas!
“ That all drede is, that ye,

nece swete,
“ Have little leisir had to slepe and mete,
All night (quod he) hath rain so do me wake,
“ That some of us I trowe their heddis ake.

my

Pan. How now, how now? how go maidenheads? ? -Here, you maid! where's my cousin Cressid ? CREs. Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking

uncle! You bring me to do, and then you flout me too.

Pan. To do what? to do what?—let her say what: what have I brought you to do? Cres. Come, come; beshrew your heart! you'll

ne'er be good, Nor suffer others.

PAN. Ha, ha! Alas, poor wretch! a poor capocchia ! -hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty man, let it sleep? a bugbear take him!

[Knocking. CREs. Did I not tell you ?—'would he were

knock'd o’the head!

9

1

“ Cresseide answerde, nevir the bet for you,

“ Foxe that ye ben, God yeve your hertè care,
“ God help me so, ye causid all this fare," &c.

STEEVENS. - to do,] To do is here used in a wanton sense. So, in The Taming of the Shrew, Petruchio says: “I would fain be doing..

Again, in All's well that ends well, Lafeu declares that he is “past doing.COLLINS.

a poor capocchia !) Pandarus would say, I think, in English–Poor innocent! Poor fool! hast not slept to-night? These appellations are very well answered by the Italian word capocchio: for capocchio signifies the thick head of a club; and thence metaphorically, a head of not much brain, a sot, dullard, heavy gull. .THEOBALD.

The word in the old copy is chipochia, for which Mr. Theobald substituted capocchio, which he has rightly explained. Capochia may perhaps be used with propriety in the same sense, when applied to a female ; but the word has also an entirely different meaning, not reconcilable to the context here, for which I choose to refer the reader to Florio's Italian Dictionary, 1598. MALONE, VOL. XV.

2c

she stays,

Tro. Beshrew the witch! with venomous wights“ As tediously? as hell; but flies the

grasps

of love, With wings more momentary-swift than thought. You will catch cold, and curse me. CRES.

Pr'ythee, tarry ;You men will never tarryO foolish Cressid - I might have still held off, And then you would have tarried. Hark! there's

one up:

PAN. [Within.] What, are all the doors open here? TRO. It is

your

uncle.

Enter PANDARUS.

CRES. A pestilence on him! now will he be

mocking: I shall have such a life,

venomous wights-] i. e. venefici ; those who practise nocturnal sorcery.

STEEVENS. ? As tediously-] The folio has :

As hideously as hell. Johnson. Sir T. Hanmer, for the sake of metre, with great probability, reads :

Tedious as hell ; &c. STEEVENS.' & Enter Pandarus.) The hint for the following short conversation between Pandarus and Cressida is taken from Chaucer's Troilus and Cresseide, Book III. v. 1561:

“ Pandare, a mórowe which that commen was

“ Unto his necè, gan her faire to grete,
“ And saied all this night so rained it alas !

" That all my drede is, that ye, nece swete,
“ Have little leisir had to slepe and mete,
“ All night (quod he) hath rain so do mé wake,
“ That some of us I trowe their heddis ake.

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