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Cricket match between Greenwich pen- | lowed to be fine striking through the whole sioners, eleven with one arm against eleven performance, and the longest peal ever rung with one leg. The one legs beat by 103 in that part of the country.-Magnis tamen runs. In the course of the match there excidit ausis ! were five legs broke, four in running, one by the blow of a bat.

August 22, died at the Bald Buck, Lich

field, the noted Jack Lewton, chaise-driver. 1796. Friday, August 20, was rung a He was buried on the Wednesday followcomplete 5040 grandsire triples at St. Mary's, ing in St. Michael's churchyard, and by his Kendal, in three hours, twenty minutes, by own request as near to the turnpike road the Westmoreland youth, — being the great- leading to Burton as possible, that he might, est number of changes ever rung upon that as he said, enjoy the satisfaction of hearing noble peal at one time. The peal was di- his brother whips pass and repass. He parvided into ten parts, or courses, of 504 each. ticularly desired that he might be carried The bobs were called by the sixth ; a lead to the grave by six chaise-drivers, his late single was made in the middle of the peal, companions, in scarlet jackets and buckskin and another at the conclusion, which brought breeches, the pall to be supported by the the bells home. Distinct leads, and exact like number of hostlers from different inns, divisions were observed throughout the and the mourners to consist of six publicans whole of the peal.

with their wives. The procession on their

way to the grave were desired to stop at Sunday, August 28, was rung at Kidder- the Old Crown inn, and refresh themselves, minster, a compleat peal of 5012 grandsire each with a glass of Hollands, his favourite triples. The peal was conducted through | liquor. with one single, which was brought to the 4984th change, viz. 1267453. It is allowed MARGARET Ycı Evan, of Pennllyn, who by those conversant in the art to exceed any inhabited a cottage on the borders of Llanpeal ever yet rung in this kingdom by that berris Lake, was the greatest hunter, shootmethod. The same peal was composed and er, and fisher of her time, rowed stoutly, called by Stephen Hill. Time, three hours played the violin, was a good carpenter and and fourteen minutes.

joiner, and wrestled so well at seventy, that An old ringer of Milford (Southampton), there were few men who dared to try a fall left three-fourths of an acre, the rent to be with her. applied in the purchase of bell-ropes for the use of the church.

In some parts of Italy they make holes

in the ground, and put in them conical caps Monday, September 12, 1796, was at- of paper bird-limed, with meat at the bottempted to be rung by eight Birmingham tom; the crows come to the bait, and are youths, some of whom were under twenty hooded. years of age, a compleat peal of 15120 bobmajors. After they had rung in a most Rats, it is said, will forsake a house if masterly manner for upwards of eight hours their road is bird-limed so as to besmear one and a half, they found themselves so much of them. fatigued, that they requested the caller to take the first opportunity to bring the bells

A PITMAN's wife in Northumberland home, which he soon did, by omitting a bob, suckled two lambs whose dams were killed and so brought them round, which made a in a storm. compleat peal of 14224 changes in eight hours and forty-five minutes; and was al- 1799. A GENTLEMAN in Herefordshire

is said to have lately married his grand- | the madness of vying with each other in mother. It is thus related :—“On Friday the quantity of game killed. Game book. Mr. John Palmer, second son of Mr. Wil- List of the killed at Woburne. One of liam Palmer of Yatton Marsh, Aymstrey, these homo's had 800 head of game in his was married to Mrs. Mary Palmer, relict | larder at one time. of the late Mr. John Palmer of Leinthall Earls, who was grandfather to her present The three sweet fire-side sounds — the husband. The bride, though she may be song of the tea-kettle; the chirping of the properly called grandmother to the bride- cricket; and the purring of the cat. groom, is no more than thirty years of age.”

“ J'ouy un jour bien naifvement un enAr Alnwick, every burgess who takes up fant de grande maison, faire feste a chascun his freedom goes in procession to a large dequoy sa mere venoit de perdre son procés, pond at some distance from the town, dress- comme sa toux, sa fiebvre, ou autre chose ed with ribbons, makes a jump into it, and d'importune garde.” — MONTAIGNE, vol. 8, gets through as he can. A party generally p. 344. perform at the same time, and then gallop back to the town, the foremost in the race 1824. The steam-engines in England rebeing pronounced winner of the boundaries. present the power of 320,000 horses, which They are entertained with ale at the gate is equal to that of 1,920,000 men. They are of the Castle by the Duke's steward, a worked by 36,000 men, and thus add to the holly tree is planted at the young freeman's power of our population 1,834,000 men.door, and the day ends with such merriment Morning Herald. as is usual—dancing, drinking, and sports.

“ THERE is a house on London Bridge Courier, July 18, 1814. " REAL red-built entirely of wood, without any mixture legged Partridge-eggs. Noblemen and gen- of iron nails therein ; therefore commonly tlemen may be supplied with any quantity called Nonesuch, for the rarity of the strucjust imported from France, by applying to ture thereof."— Fuller's Pisgah Sight, p. Mr. Joseph Clark, Poulterer, South Audley 261. Street."

Projected Contents. THERE are odd persons all the world

New System of Education. over, but in other parts of the world they die and their oddities with them. In Eng

Young Roscius. Missions. land every man's oddities find some faithful

Religious Magazines. Gipsies. chronicler. Thus a chapter of Obituary

Strolling Players. Sandemanians. Anecdotes.

Parliamentary Reform.

Catholic Emancipation. Want of churches in large towns. Mary

Public Schools. bone contains not less than 60,000 inha

Astley's, Royal Circus, &c. bitants. Pancras in the same predicament

Pidcock. Travelling Elephants at Bris-very populous, with only one church. Yet tol Fair. we found Catholic colleges, and have no

Moravians. Luddites.

Death of Mr. Perceval. Almanacks. money for churches !

Navy and Army Lists, and Periodicals PRESERVES the main cause of poaching; of this nation.

Gas Lights. Insurance Offices. " The miry pool is called the “ Freeman's

Police. Prostitution. well,” and the custom still exists.-J. W.W. 0. P. The Green Man.

Mr. Coates. Bible Society.

gave him the mangas and faldamentos. Away English Orthography. Elphinstone. Pin- went Perico to the court brotherhood, and kerton. Gil's Logonomia Anglica, 1621, 4to. requested them to bury one who had died is said in Rodd's Catalogue to be the first at the Marquis's, and then away went the attempt to write the English language as it funeral procession, with the little death bell is spoken.

tinkling before them. The marquis seeing Freemasons.

them at his door, asked why they came ? Popular Songs and Ballads. Tract So- “ For the body," said the fool, “ as the cieties.

chamberlain only gave him the trimmings." Want of a Dictionary. Skaiting. -Ibid. p. 125. Country Sports.

A knight once asked him what were the Population. Bills of Mortality. Pro- properties of a turquoise ? “Why," said the portion of the Sexes.

fool, “ if you have a turquoise about you, Lotteries.

and should fall from the top of a tower and Nunneries - Protestant. Connect this be dashed to pieces, the stone would not with the chapter on Prostitution. See break."-Ibid. p. 124. Mary Astell, in the Biographies.

It is a good remark of DAVIES (Dramatic The Varment Club. Four-in-hand Club. Miscellanies), that fools seem to have been

Patent Coffins. Funerals. Burial-places. employed to supply the want of free society. At Lambeth they probe! before they open A jest from an equal was an insult; yet cona grave.

versation wanted its pepper, and vinegar, Bullion. Richmond. Windsor.

and mustard. Tunbridge. Hastings. Winchelsea. Rye. Brighton.

DURING Lockyer's reign at Bristol, 6000 Bristol. Ilfracombe.

houses were planned ; an increase which The Wye. Merthyr. Hereford. Wor- would bave required at least 60,000 inhacester.

bitants, they were houses of such size. It Norwich. Nottingham.- So through the

was like the South Sea infatuation. cave country

SPERMACETI manufactory. No dog was

safe in the neighbourhood, and no horse. Fools. WHEN or where did this character ori- Debat and his Sermons. My Uncle T., ginate?

having heard the text of one, could name Charles the Fifth had an excellent fool, the texts for the next six weeks; which he Don Frances; he was staunch to the last, did once for a wager. When Debat was told for when some assassins had mortally wound- this, he readily answered, “ I am very glad ed him, and his wife hearing a disturbance

to find that any one of my congregation is at the door, enquired what was the matter? so attentive." “Nothing, Mistress," said he; "they have only killed your husband.” A fool, Perico My Uncle T. made a good stand against de Ayala, who was his friend, begged him erecting the pulpit so, as that the preacher to pray for him in the next world, Frances should have his back to the altar. “I shall replied, “Tie a string round my little finger, live,” he says, “ to see a great many asses lest I should forget it.”—FLOREsta's Espanola, p. 123.

· The turquoise, it is well known, was thought Perico de Ayala, the Marquis of Villena, its owner, as it looked pale or bright. True

to possess the rare power of giving warning to once ordered his wardrobe-keeper to give

as a turquoise became a proverb, and is used by the fool un sayo de brocado; the man only Ben Jonson.-J. W. W.

When a

get up in that pulpit; and I should not like CHEDDAR. The whole parish clubbed to hear them braying at the congregation, their milk to make a cheese for the lord of and at the Altar and the Decalogue." the manor (the late Lord Weymouth, so

called, 1772), when he came of age. TastLack of employment for females. ing it, it proved not good, and was therefore

not presented. When it was scooped out, GEORGE Lukins. Man walking on the the cavity was large enough to hold a girl water. Colliers. Penpark, Hol, and Tucker. of thirteen. Mr. Levi. A conjurer at Mangotsfield. MORAVIANS.

GLASTONBURY waters. The history of one

patient here is very remarkable. English loyalty. Vivat Rex et Regina lad, he was so terrified at the ghost of Hamon the play bills.

let at Drury Lane, that in consequence of

the shock, a humour broke out, and settled CRIMPING.

in the king's evil. After all medicines had Peynne was imprisoned at Dunster under failed, he came to these waters, and they Cromwell.

effected a thorough cure. Faith cured what

fear had produced. MINEHEAD in 1772 a place of respectable trade. A West India trade in connection Japan ink and Japan blacking. with Barnstaple or Bristol, and pilchards to the amount of 300 or 400 barrels arrived The celebrated Belleish convent soap can and exported to the Mediterranean. only be had in a fair and unadulterated state

at the original Opificium of C. Mason & Co., Use of saffron in old times.

No. 116, Pall Mall. Our fashionables might almost keep Ra

Russia oil, which restores hair on bald madan all the year round, without altering their present mode of life.-Koran, vol. i. and of which no bottles are genuine unless

heads, and prevents it from growing grey ;

they have the Russian eagle on the outside, For low-born gentry I heard T. Southey

and are signed in red ink by the proprietors, use a strong expression :- Fellows,” he

Mochrikufsky and Prince, to counterfeit called them, “ who have not nails enough to

which is felony. May we not hint that the scratch their heads with."

difficulty of counterfeiting would be greatly

increased if Mochrikufsky would sign his George Robart's mother died during the name in the Russ character.-Mockery en great election at Bristol, and her death was verdad. kept secret till it was over, because he was too active a man to be spared. Just when BAJAZET's oriental depilatory. Athenian this had been settled between him and T. wiggery. Southey, T. went to the post office and found Bloom of Circassia. Milk of roses. Vioa letter to tell him his own mother was dead. let soap. Almond paste. Palmyrene soap. That also was not made known till after the Pearl dentrifice. poll was closed.

The man who makes pearl soap adver

tises for old pearls. On the authority of James the waggoner's Udor Kallithrix, or Circassian water. son, it is stated that every Bristol appren- Neureticopeklicon. tice must draw a truck, in order to acquire

The celebrated Polish vegetable soap his freedom.

paste, prepared by M. Delcroix in Poland

p. 3.

66

Street, from a recipe of M. Brufkosky, his | There is a well here, once an object of pilfriend, an eminent chemist at Warsaw, the grimage; but whether dedicated of St. Mary sole inventor of this precious composition, or St. Winifred, now doubtful. which has been universally approved of by persons of the first rank inhabiting that blank The Provence rose, as it is called, was and frozen country.

found by a nurseryman near London, at a

farmer's in Suffolk. He took a slip, nurst it ATHENIAN wiggery.

secretly till he had offsets in abundance, Iligu beds. Feather bed.

then advertised it perseveringly, and made

a fortune! He gave the farmer a very handMrs. K. knew a servant man, remarkably

some piece of plate, which is shown at the parsimonious, who gave an itinerant female

house with great pleasure and pride. quack ten guineas for a bottle of stuff, which was to bring hair on his head (he having

Old Winstone! benefit advertisement at been bald twenty years), if he rubbed one

Jacob's Well, “ that on that night Cynthia tea spoonful every night, and took another, would appear in all her glory." as long as the bottle lasted. He bargained very hard to let it be pounds.

TURNER knew a man retired from busiPatent elastic India cotton invisible pet- ness, whose daily employment was to angle ticoats, manufactured for the spring.

in one of the round citizen-garden fish

ponds, where he had some unlucky gold and Beauty improved, preserved, and ren- silver fish, &c. One fish, which had once dered permanent by the habitual use of the lost an eye by the hook, used to bite so Sicilian soap, or Italian washing paste, pre- often as to provoke him.“ Hang that felpared from cosmetic flowers, balsams, and low," he would say ;

" this is the sixth time herbs collected in Sicily and the fruitful | I have caught him this season.” plains of Italy. The use of this soap ren- He knew another man, a spent merchant, ders the operation of shaving most luxuri- in like manner retired, who was miserable ously agreeable.

till he invented, as an amusement, the daily “By Divine Providence,"—Wither's balm work of emptying a water cistern by a pint of Quito.

measure ! The Reverend Mr. Barclay, of the antibilious pill, and solvent nervous specific Ar Knightsbridge, William Ick, purdrops, is now metamorphosed into Barclay- veyor of asses' milk to the royal family. oni. At Brough, four bells the largest in the

REGULARITY of a stage-coachman's life. county. One Brunskili, who lived upon

At one house where he called about half Stanemore, and had many cattle, said one day past seven, he said at going away, “In a to one of his neighbours, “ Dost thou hear week I shall see you by daylight." how loud these bulls low ? and if all these cattle should low (crunen is the word), might

City wall at Salisbury. Mud walls in that they not be heard from Brough hither?" neighbourhood thatched. Walking to Hale, The man said yes. “Well then," said he, “I'll

I saw a cripple boy playing with his crutches; make them all crune together.” And he sold leaning on the one, he used the other as a them, and bought these bells for the church.

bat to play with the stones in the road.

PARK paling
" The reader should refer to the ballad. See
Poems, p. 466. One vol. edit. To croon, says
BROcket, in v. is to“ bellow like a disquiet ox.”

BLACKBIRD is the commonest name of a Dut. Kreunen.-J. W. W.

horse in Somersetshire.

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