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THE

GREATER NEW YORK CHARTER

AS ENACTED IN 1897,

WITH NOTES

INDICATING THE DERIVATORY STATUTES AND REFERENCES

TO JUDICIAL DECISIONS RELATING THERETO,

TOGETHER WITH

APPENDIXES

OF THE

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS IN GREATER NEW YORK, ACCORDING TO THE
APPORTIONMENT OF 1895; THE WARDS OF THE VARIOUS
CITIES CONSOLIDATED; THE BUILDING LAWS OF NEW
YORK CITY, BROOKLYN AND LONG ISLAND CITY
CONTINUED IN FORCE BY THE CHARTER;
THE ARTICLE OF THE CONSTITU-

TION RELATING TO CITIES;

AND THE

ENGLISH COLONIAL CHARTERS.

BY

MARK ASH,

OF THE NEW YORK BAR.

ALBANY, N. Y.:
WEED-PARSONS PRINTING COMPANY.

1897.

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PREFACE.

The morement for consolidation of the cities of New York, Erooklyn and contiguous territory, which had its inception in 1890, and culminated seven years later in the Charter appearing herein, will mark an epoch in the history of municipalities in this western continent. Beginning with the preliminary stage of investigation by a legislative Commission of Municipal Consolidation Inquiry, the great project advanced, step by step, despite all obstacles, until, in 1896, the union became an accomplished fact, and a commission was appointed to prepare the organic law of the new city.

The commission, noted for the distinguished character of its in members, fitted by experience and calling for the important civic duty confided to them, appointed, in the first instance, a sub-committee on draft, which presented to the main body, as , the result of its labors, a proposed charter, with an exhaustive report, discussing the features thereof. This draft was then taken up by the entire commission, and after discussion at: public hearings, and in executive session, resulting in changes and amendments, the Charter and supplementary legislation, almost as finally enacted, were presented to the legislature by the commission, on February 18, 1897, with its report. These two exhaustive reports of the commission and the sub-committee on draft, affording the best commentary upon the Charter, have been reprinted in full, with all the legislation touching the consolidation, in the Introductory.

The conspicuous features of the Greater New York Charter are the borough system, with its twenty-two boards, vested with power to initiate local improvements; the municipal assembly, consisting of two chambers; and the single-headed

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Entered according to act of Congress, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven,

BY WEED-PARSONS PRINTING COMPANY.
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

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PREFACE.

The movement for consolidation of the cities of New York, Brooklyn and contiguous territory, which had its inception in 1890, and culminated seven years later in the Charter appearing herein, will mark an epoch in the history of municipalities in this western continent. Beginning with the preliminary stage of investigation by a legislative Commission of Municipal Consolidation Inquiry, the great project advanced, step by ste step, despite all obstacles, until, in 1896, the union became an accomplished fact, and a commission was appointed to prepare the organic law of the new city.

The commission, noted for the distinguished character of its le members, fitted by experience and calling for the important civic duty confided to them, appointed, in the first instance, a sub-committee on draft, which presented to the main body, as, the result of its labors, a proposed charter, with an exhaustive report, discussing the features thereof. This draft was then taken up by the entire commission, and after discussion at public hearings, and in executive session, resulting in changes and amendments, the Charter and supplementary legislation, almost as finally enacted, were presented to the legislature by the commission, on February 18, 1897, with its report. These two exhaustive reports of the commission and the sub-committee on draft, affording the best commentary upon the Charter, have been reprinted in full, with all the legislation touching the consolidation, in the Introductory.

-The conspicuous features of the Greater New York Charter 6 are the borough system, with its twenty-two boards, vested a with power to initiate local improvements; the municipal assembly, consisting of two chambers; and the single-headed

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